That Was the Year That Was – 1999

That Was the Year That Was - 1999

1999 The worlds population exceeds Six Billion. The Wars in the Balkans continue to cause suffering in the region, but both sides do come to the table and a peace is agreed. The world prepares for the new millennium parties and computers around the world run testing for the millennium bug which could cause wide scale disruption to business and infrastructure if not fixed. The take up of the Internet and Mobile Phones around the world open up new opportunities for successful entrepreneurs.

The Ladbroke Grove rail crash claims the lives of 31 people when two trains collide at Ladbroke Grove Junction, 2 miles west of Paddington station, London. Many more people are being treated in hospital for injuries.

A minimum wage is introduced throughout the UK – set at £3.60 an hour for workers over 21, and £3 for workers under 21.

Rogue trader Nick Leeson returns home to England from Singapore, nearly four years after he was jailed there after his illegal dealings led to the collapse of Barings Bank with losses of £850million.

The solar eclipse attracts the attention of 350million people across Europe, with Cornwall being the only region of Britain to experience totality.

Rock singer Gary Glitter, 54, is jailed for four months at Bristol Crown Court for downloading child pornography.

Patrick Magee is released from prison under the Good Friday Agreement, 14 years into his life sentence for the Provisional Irish Republican Army bombing at the Grand Hotel in Brighton, which killed five people during the Conservative Party conference on 12 October 1984.

Given the 20th century’s reputation for conflict, it is perhaps not surprising that its final year saw the biggest European war since 1945, and closed with bloodshed as Russian troops marched into Chechnya. There were other types of tragedy. Earthquakes killed thousands in Colombia, Taiwan and particularly Turkey – the latter notable for the way the Web helped the victims and their relatives communicate. On an individual level, the death of TV presenter Jill Dando struck home in the UK.

Deaths

2 March – Singer Dusty Springfield, who received an OBE last month, dies aged 59 after a five-year battle against breast cancer.

7 March – American-born film director Stanley Kubrick dies at his home in St Albans, Hertfordshire, aged 70, five days after completing his final film Eyes Wide Shut, which is released in July.

21 March – Comedian Ernie Wise, who formed one-half of the Morecambe and Wise comedy double from 1941 to 1984, dies of a heart attack aged 73.

16 June – David Sutch, the founder of the Official Monster Raving Loony Party, is found hanged at his home in Harrow. He was 58.

17 June – Cardinal Basil Hume, leader of the Roman Catholic Church in England and Wales, dies of cancer aged 76 barely two months after the illness was diagnosed.

1 July – William Whitelaw, Viscount of Penrith and former deputy prime minister under Margaret Thatcher, dies at the age of 81.

Not all the news was bad, of course. There were the usual sporting triumphs, with Australia winning world cups in both rugby union and cricket. And admirers of the UK royal family were cheered by the marriage of Prince Edward to Sophie Rhys-Jones. Construction of the Millennium Dome is finished and The Millennium Stadium, national sports stadium for Wales, is opened in Cardiff.

31 December – Millennium celebrations are held across the country including the official opening of the Millennium Dome and the unveiling of the London Eye in London.

The curious case of Jill Dando

Jill Dando was shot in the head at point-blank range on the doorstep at her Fulham home in 1999. Barry George was found guilty of her murder in 2001 but his conviction was quashed in 2008. More than 100 potential murder suspects who could have shot dead Jill Dando on her doorstep in a ‘professional hit’ were never traced by police, it was later revealed. Intelligence reports show that detectives dismissed links to M25 road rage killer Kenneth Noye, the IRA and a team of Serbian hitmen. It came as it emerged that Scotland Yard interviewed her celebrity friends, including Sir Cliff Richard and Jeremy Paxman, about her lifestyle.

Miss Dando, 37, was shot once in the head outside her home in Fulham, south west London, on April 26, 1999. Neighbours found her slumped against her front door in a pool of blood. The crime shocked Britain and has not been solved, after Barry George was acquitted after eight years in prison. The documents reveal that among the 100 suspects were members of the Serbian secret service, IRA members and a British gangster based in Spain. At least 11 men seen in the presenter’s west London street on the day she was shot dead were never found.

Mark Williams-Thomas, the criminologist who helped expose Jimmy Savile as one of Britain’s worst paedophiles, said today ‘I have no doubt that the name of the killer or the person that arranged the ‘professional hit’ on is contained within the files’. Detectives instead pursued loner Barry George – with an IQ of 75 – who was jailed then later acquitted after eight years in prison.

Doctor Death

‘Doctor Death’ Harold Frederick Shipman killed 250 patients – possibly more – earning him the distinction of Britain’s most prolific serial killer.

Harold Frederick Shipman must have been playing hooky the day his medical school taught the Hippocratic oath. Doing no harm appeared to be the last thing on his mind. Over a quarter of a century, the bespectacled physician with the cordial bedside manner did away with about 250 patients — although some estimate that many more may have died at his hands — earning him the distinction as the most prolific serial killer in British history and perhaps the world.

During his career, at least 3,000 patients would put their lives in his hands, even though his professional history was less than a glittering one. Problems emerged within four years of his 1970 graduation from the Leeds University medical school. Shipman easily landed a general practitioner post in Todmorden. But soon after his appointment, he started suffering from frequent blackouts. The cause of these spells was discovered to be an addiction to a prescription painkiller, pethidine, which he had obtained by writing prescriptions in his patients’ names and taking the drugs himself. He was fired, fined, and sent into rehab, but retained his license to practice.

On Oct. 5, 1999, Shipman went on trial, charged with the murders of 15 women, ages 49 to 81, and forgery. Shipman denied administering the lethal shots, even though he was with all of the patients shortly before death. He insisted he had no idea how the women got the drugs. It took nearly 34 hours for the seven-man, five-woman jury to find him guilty on Jan. 31, 2000. “You are a wicked, wicked man,” Judge Thayne Forbes told Shipman, who received a life sentence.

Soon after the verdict, the British health secretary announced the start of an inquiry into the suspicious deaths of more than 450 of Shipman’s patients. In July 2002, the first of several reports on the inquiry listed 215 victims, ranging from a 41-year-old man to a 93-year-old woman. His first victim was Eva Lyons, who died on March 17, 1975, a day before her 71st birthday.

The inquiry also revealed that there had been several red flags along the way, including a report to police from local undertakers that Shipman’s patients were dying at a rate 10 times higher than other physicians. Had police carried out thorough investigations, at least some of Shipman’s victims might have been saved.

The exact number of his murdered patients will never be known, but on Jan. 13, 2004, Shipman took one more life. On the eve of his 58th birthday, his jailers found him in his cell, a “swinger,” hanging from a noose he had fashioned from bedsheets. Prison psychiatrists expressed surprise, saying that the doctor had shown no signs of being a suicide risk.

"people born with disabilities are paying for sins in a previous life"

Glenn Hoddle has lost his job as England manager after his comments about disabled people. Hoddle, who is replaced by former Leeds manager Howard Wilkinson for next week’s friendly against World Champions France, apologised for a "serious error of judgement". FA Executive Director David Davies told a chaotic news conference: "The FA and Glenn Hoddle have agreed to terminate Glenn’s contract.

He had ruled out resigning over his comments in last Saturday’s Times, interpreted as suggesting disabled people were being made to pay for the sins of past lives.

"You and I have been physically given two hands and two legs and half-decent brains," he was quoted as saying. "Some people have not been born like that for a reason. The karma is working from another lifetime. "I have nothing to hide about that. It is not only people with disabilities. What you sow, you have to reap."

They weren’t too angry at him when his team lost at the World Cup. They only snickered when he hired a faith healer to help cure his players’ injuries. But when Glenn Hoddle, coach of England’s national soccer team, was quoted as saying that disabled people were paying for sins committed in previous lives, it was too much.

Yesterday, Hoddle got the sack. And many Britons, who have strenuously resisted the growing imposition of American-style political correctness, conceded that the firing was a good idea. Hoddle, long known as a born-again Christian with somewhat unorthodox religious views, reportedly made the remarks in a high-profile interview that appeared Saturday in the influential Times of London.

Tony Martin, 15 years on: I don’t want to go back there because it could happen again

Fifteen years after he shot and killed a 16 year-old burglar, farmer Tony Martin has yet to return home, choosing to stay with friends, in a hotel and sleep rough in his car. Mr Martin, now 69, said he did not want to go back to his Norfolk farmhouse – called Bleak House – in case he was burgled again. He said he would not hesitate to do the same again if he was and did not want to go back to prison.

"If I was in Bleak House again and someone came in there then I’m not going to just stand there and let him hurt me. I’m going to act,” he said. “That’s one of the reasons I don’t want to go back there because it could happen again. I don’t relish the idea of going back in there, getting arrested and going to prison again,” he added.
After the shooting, on August 20, 1999, the farmhouse – left to him by an uncle – was boarded up with sheet metal and has remained that way ever since.

Mr Martin, a bachelor, was convicted of murder and jailed for life in April 2000 for killing 16 year-old Fred Barras and seriously injuring his accomplice, Brendon Fearon, then 28. His sentence was later reduced to manslaughter on the grounds of diminished responsibility after a psychiatrist said he had paranoid personality disorder, probably made worse by an earlier invasion of his property by burglars, and he was released from prison in 2003 having served three years.

The incident provoked a fierce debate over the right of homeowners to defend themselves and their property and led to the Association of Chief Police Officers (ACPO) releasing new guidelines stating that a householder could use "reasonable force" to protect themselves against crime.

Mr Martin, who was said to be living in fear after a burglary three months earlier, shot them with an unlicensed Winchester pump action shotgun. During his murder trial, the court heard that Mr Martin was well known in the area for his outspoken views on criminals particularly travellers, and lived an unconventional life in his ramshackle farmhouse, which was lit with just two lights. He told the court he fired in the darkness from halfway down the stairs into his breakfast room after a torch was shone into his eyes, insisting he was acting in self-defence. The prosecution, however, persuaded the jury that Mr Martin had lain in wait for the burglars and shot them in cold blood.

London nail bomber David Copeland

David Copeland’s terrifying campaign ended on a quiet night in a Hampshire town as the dead and maimed were still being counted from the wreckage of the Admiral Duncan pub in Soho. Officers from Scotland Yard’s Flying Squad knocked on the door of a house in Sunnybank Road, Cove. Copeland opened the front door, rubbed his eyes and mumbled: "Yeah, they were all down to me. I did them on my own."

Any doubts the officers had disappeared when Copeland led them to his bedroom. Two red-and-black Nazi flags were hanging on a wall, alongside a macabre collage of photos and newspaper stories. The theme was bomb blasts. Copeland was eager to give detectives a graphic account of how he had made and planted the three devices. But there was one issue he could not explain. Why?

With a primed bomb taped to the inside of a sports bag, Copeland had taken a taxi to Brixton on Saturday, April 17, 1999. He left the bag on the corner of Electric Avenue. It was spotted by nearby street traders, who wondered if it was a bomb. Just as the police arrived at 5.25pm, the device exploded. Fifty people were injured.

Detectives began scanning CCTV coverage of Brixton. The following Saturday, a second explosion took place, this time in east London. Copeland had left a bomb in a Head holdall in Hanbury Street but it was spotted by a member of the public who called the police. "He was dialling 999 from when the device went off," said a source. Thirteen people were injured. Four days later, police identified a man in Brixton who had been carrying a Head sports bag. The CCTV images were given to the media on Thursday.

Copeland decided to bring forward his next attack by a day. The Admiral Duncan pub was full when walked in. He left at 6.05pm and heard the explosion as he walked back to his hotel. Three people died and four needed amputations. Twenty-six people suffered serious burns, another 53 were injured. Eighty minutes before the bomb went off, Paul Mifsud rang a police hotline to say a work colleague resembled the man caught on camera.

By 9pm, officers had Copeland’s and by midnight, they were planning a raid on his house.

Lord Sutch found hung in home

David Sutch, who brought a chuckle to British politics as leader of the Monster Raving Loony Party with the slogan: “Vote for insanity – you know it makes sense,” has died at age 58. He was found hanged Wednesday at his northwest London home by his partner, Yvonne Elwood, who said that although Sutch had fought a long battle with depression he seemed happy in the days leading up to his death. A friend said he was taking anti-depressants and Scotland Yard said they were treating the death as suspicious.

Known as Screaming Lord Sutch, he was Britain’s longest-serving party leader and although he was never elected despite running in scores of races, one of his party members, Alan Hope, was once elected mayor in a town in southwest England. During the 1960s he was a rock singer, and until recently performed up to 250 concerts a year throughout Europe. Sutch never married but leaves a 24-year-old son, Tristan, from his relationship with American model Thann Quantrill, who once helped him contest one of his first elections by riding naked through a town on horseback.

The night George Harrison thought he was dying

Ex-Beatle shouted ‘Hare Krishna’ to distract psychotic intruder from trying to murder him and his wife, court is told. Former Beatle George Harrison thought he had been fatally wounded by a psychotic intruder who believed he was on a mission from God to kill the pop star, an Oxford court heard yesterday. The jury was told how Harrison and his wife Olivia fought with Michael Abrams who was armed with a knife and part of a stone sword broken from a statue of St George and the Dragon at the couple’s Oxfordshire mansion.

In a statement read to the court, Harrison described tasting blood in his mouth as he lay on his back upstairs in his home, and hearing his lung deflate when Abrams plunged the knife into his chest. "There was a time during this violent struggle that I truly believed I was dying," he said. He said he chanted "Hare Krishna, Hare Krishna" at the man, in a vain effort to distract him.

Oxford crown court heard that three psychiatrists who have examined Abrams concluded that he intended to kill Harri son because he believed the star had possessed him. But they also decided that he did not realise he was doing wrong because of these "delusional" beliefs.

There was no dispute, the prosecution said, that Abrams, who is from Liverpool, carried out the attack on December 30 last year. But it was up to the jury to decide if his plea that he was not guilty of attempting to kill Harrison and his wife "by reason of insanity" should be accepted. According to the prosecution, the defendant believed God had sent him on the murder mission.

A schizophrenic man who is being freed 19 months after he was detained for stabbing George Harrison, has apologised – and insisted he is no longer a risk. Michael Abram said: "If I could turn back the clock I would give anything not to have done what I did. But I have come to realise that I was very ill at that time, really not in control. "People may find it hard to accept but with the help of the medication I’m on I am sure I can lead a normal life. I just want to be an ordinary bloke."

1999 Timeline

January – Vauxhall launches a facelifted Vectra to improve its disappointing ride and build quality.

1 January – The Euro currency is launched, but Britain’s Labour government reportedly has no plans to introduce the currency here, preferring to stick to pound sterling instead.

5 January – Provisional viewing figures suggest that an episode of ITV’s Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? aired on 3 January was watched by 17 million viewers, making it the highest viewed television programme (excluding soaps and World Cup matches) since 1997.

As he prepares to launch a new series of Parkinson, broadcaster Michael Parkinson criticises his chat show rival, Ian Wright, telling BBC Radio 5 Live’s Sybil Ruscoe that Wright has a "careless attitude" and does not have the "understanding" to do his job properly.

In a stunt organised by the recently launched "lads’ magazine" Front, television presenter Noel Edmonds is hit in the face with two custard pies while filming for Noel’s House Party in London’s Oxford Street. The BBC announces that Noel’s House Party will be axed after eight years. The most recent edition of the show drew an audience of less than six million, and it will finish when its current run ends on 20 March.

13 January – Unemployment has fallen to just over 1,300,000 – the lowest for 20 years.

30 January – England national football team manager Glenn Hoddle gives an interview to The Times newspaper in which he suggests that people born with disabilities are paying for sins in a previous life.

2 February – The Football Association dismisses Glenn Hoddle as manager due to the controversy sparked by his comments about disabled people.

12 February – Scientists at the Rowett Research Institute in Aberdeen reinforce warnings that Genetically modified food may be damaging to the human body.

22 February – Harold Shipman, the Hyde GP accused of murdering eight female patients last September, is charged with a further seven murders.

24 February – The report of the murder of black London teenager Stephen Lawrence, who was stabbed to death in 1993, condemns London’s police force as "institutionally racist", as well as condemning its officers for "fundamental errors".

2 March – Singer Dusty Springfield, who received an OBE last month, dies aged 59 after a five-year battle against breast cancer.

7 March – American-born film director Stanley Kubrick dies at his home in St Albans, Hertfordshire, aged 70, five days after completing his final film Eyes Wide Shut, which is released in July.

9 March – A contestant who won £125,000 on Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? despite answering a question incorrectly will be allowed to keep his prize money, it is reported. The error occurred after researchers matched the wrong answer with a question about tennis, but the mistake was quickly spotted by viewers. Celador, which produces the show, says it will review its checking procedure.

21 March – Comedian Ernie Wise, who formed one-half of the Morecambe and Wise comedy double from 1941 to 1984, dies of a heart attack aged 73.

24 March – Ross Kemp, who has achieved TV stardom with his role as Grant Mitchell in EastEnders, signs a £1million deal with ITV, meaning that he will leave EastEnders this autumn after nearly 10 years.

26 March – A total £2billion in compensation is paid to 100,000 former miners who are suffering from lung disease after years of working in British coalfields.

29 March – The family of James Hanratty, one of the last men to be executed in Britain for the A6 murder 37 years ago, are given the right to appeal against his murder conviction by the Criminal Cases Review Commission.

April – Vauxhall launches its Zafira, a compact MPV which makes use of the Astra hatchback’s chassis.

1 April – A minimum wage is introduced throughout the UK – set at £3.60 an hour for workers over 21, and £3 for workers under 21.

Anthony Sawoniuk, 78, becomes the first person convicted of Second World War crimes in a British court when he is sentenced to life imprisonment for the murder of 18 Jews in his native Belarus. He has lived in Britain since 1947.

14 April – Edgar Pearce, the so-called "Mardi Gra bomber", convicted for a series of bombings and sentenced to 21 years in jail.

17 April – A bomb explodes in Brixton, South London, and injures 45 people.

24 April – A second bomb explosion in Brick Lane, east London injures 13 people.

26 April – TV presenter Jill Dando, 37, dies after being shot on the doorstep of her Fulham home.

30 April – A third bomb in London explodes in the Admiral Duncan pub, in Old Compton Street, Soho, London – the centre of the London gay scene – killing two people (including a pregnant woman) and injuring over thirty. David Copeland, a 23-year-old Farnborough man, is arrested hours later in connection with the three explosions.

3 May – David Copeland appears in court charged with the recent bombings in London.

6 May – Scottish Parliament election, 1999 – The first elections to the Scottish Parliament.

Welsh Assembly election, 1999 – The first elections to the Welsh Assembly.

7 May – The Labour Party and the Liberal Democrats form a coalition government in Scotland, with Donald Dewar as the First Minister of Scotland.

12 May – The Scottish Parliament meets in Edinburgh for its first session.

18 May – The BBC’s Crimewatch programme broadcasts a reconstruction of presenter Jill Dando’s murder. The show opens without its usual titles and music.

21 May – Jill Dando is buried in her hometown of Weston-super-Mare.

25 May – Probably the last colliery horse to work underground in a British coal mine is retired, ‘Robbie’ at Pant y Gasseg, near Pontypool.

26 May – The Welsh Assembly meets in Cardiff for its first session.

31 May – The Princess Royal opens the new Midland Metro tram service in the West Midlands, which runs on a 15-mile route mostly consisted of disused railway lines between Birmingham and Wolverhampton.

5 June – Ian Moor wins the tenth series of Stars in Their Eyes, performing as Chris De Burgh.

8 June – former cabinet minister Jonathan Aitken is sentenced to 18 months prison for perjury.

10 June – The European parliament elections are held. The Conservatives enjoy their best performance in any election since the 1992 general election by gaining 36 seats compared to Labour’s 29 – a stark contrast to the previous European elections five years ago where they had a mere 18 MEP’s compared to Labour’s 62.

12 June – The Queen’s Birthday Honours are announced. They include a knighthood for the Manchester United manager Alex Ferguson and the ITV newsreader Trevor McDonald.

14 June – Conservative leader William Hague hails his party’s strong European election results as vindication of his party’s opposition to the single European currency.

16 June – David Sutch, the founder of the Official Monster Raving Loony Party, is found hanged at his home in Harrow. He was 58.

17 June – Cardinal Basil Hume, leader of the Roman Catholic Church in England and Wales, dies of cancer aged 76 barely two months after the illness was diagnosed.

18 June – Police clash with protesters at a demonstration against capitalism in London.

19 June – The marriage of The Prince Edward and Sophie Rhys-Jones takes place at St George’s Chapel, Windsor. Prior to the marriage, The Queen creates Prince Edward, her third and youngest son, Earl of Wessex and Viscount Severn.

22 June – Patrick Magee is released from prison under the Good Friday Agreement, 14 years into his life sentence for the Provisional Irish Republican Army bombing at the Grand Hotel in Brighton, which killed five people during the Conservative Party conference on 12 October 1984.

23 June – Fears about the future of the Rover Group’s Longbridge plant in Birmingham are calmed by the news that owner BMW is to invest £2.5billion in the plant.

Construction of the Millennium Dome is finished.

26 June – The Millennium Stadium, national sports stadium for Wales, is opened in Cardiff.

30 June – Manchester United announce that they will not compete in the FA Cup in the forthcoming football season so they can concentrate on their participation in the FIFA World Club Championship in Brazil at the start of the next year. Their decision is seen as a major boost to England’s hopes of hosting the 2006 World Cup.

1 July – William Whitelaw, Viscount of Penrith and former deputy prime minister under Margaret Thatcher, dies at the age of 81.

4 July – Rogue trader Nick Leeson returns home to England from Singapore, nearly four years after he was jailed there after his illegal dealings led to the collapse of Barings Bank with losses of £850million.

5 July – Chelsea pay a club record of £10million (one of the highest fees paid by any English club) for the Blackburn Rovers striker Chris Sutton.

9 July – Neil Kinnock, who was Labour Party leader from 1983 to 1992 while they were in opposition, is appointed vice-president of the European Commission.

30 July – Three contestants who did not disclose unspent criminal convictions before appearing on ITV’s Who Wants to Be a Millionaire? are to have their winnings withdrawn, the show’s producers confirm.

4 August – George Robertson appointed as Secretary General of NATO.

The JJB Stadium opens in Wigan, to serve the town’s football and rugby teams.

9 August – Charles Kennedy elected leader of the Liberal Democrats.

11 August – The solar eclipse attracts the attention of 350million people across Europe, with Cornwall being the only region of Britain to experience totality.

19 August – Claims by The Sun that it has obtained a document detailing EastEnders plotlines for the forthcoming year have been dismissed by the show’s producers.

20 August – A MORI poll shows Labour support at 49%, giving them a 22-point lead over the Conservatives. However, it is the first time since their election win over two years ago that they have polled at less than 50% in the poll by the leading market research company.

22 August – Norfolk farmer Tony Martin, 54, is charged with the murder of a 16-year-old burglar who was shot dead at his home two days ago. He is also charged with wounding a 29-year-old man who was also present at the time of the burglary.

September – Rover launches the 25 and 45. Nissan launches a facelifted Primera to be built at NMUK.

5 September – First broadcast of the children’s TV programme ‘The Tweenies’

6 September – Bobby Robson, the 66-year-old former England manager, is appointed as Newcastle United’s new manager. He is nearly 30 years older than his predecessor Ruud Gullit.

7 September – A man is arrested by police after using a coffee table to smash his way through a plate glass window into the BBC newsroom at White City as journalists prepare for the 11.00am bulletin. The intruder also hurled computers and furniture in what is reported to be a protest against the BBC’s coverage of a story. The broadcaster launches an inquiry into the incident, after security was tightened at the BBC in the wake of Jill Dando’s murder.

9 September – Chris Patten’s report recommends reform of Royal Ulster Constabulary.

24 September – The Royal Bank of Scotland launches a hostile takeover bid for the NatWest Bank.

27 September – The Midland Bank adopts the name of its owner HSBC, marking an end of the Midland Bank name after 163 years.

1 October – The Rugby World Cup begins in the Millennium Stadium, Cardiff.

5 October – The Ladbroke Grove rail crash claims the lives of 31 people when two trains collide at Ladbroke Grove Junction, 2 miles west of Paddington station, London. Many more people are being treated in hospital for injuries.

Harold Shipman goes on trial at Preston Crown Court accused of murdering 15 female patients who died in the Greater Manchester area between 1995 and 1998.

10 October – The London Eye begins to be lifted into position on the South Bank in London.

16 October – 26 players are sent off in Premier League and Football League matches on the same day – the most dismissals on the same day in 111 years of league football in England.

19 October – Tracey Emin exhibits My Bed at the Tate Gallery as one of the shortlisted works for the Turner Prize.

20 October – Sales of Rover cars are reported to have fallen by 30% this year.

12 November – Rock singer Gary Glitter, 54, is jailed for four months at Bristol Crown Court for downloading child pornography. He is, however, cleared of having unlawful sex with a teenage fan 20 years ago.

17 November – England qualify for Euro 2000 with a 2–1 aggregate win over Scotland in the qualifying playoff round.

10 December – Launch of the European Space Agency’s XMM-Newton satellite. Information from the satellite is processed at the University of Leicester.

30 December – Former Beatle George Harrison, 56, suffers minor stab wounds after being attacked by an intruder at Friar Park, his mansion near Henley-on-Thames in Oxfordshire.

31 December – Millennium celebrations are held across the country including the official opening of the Millennium Dome and the unveiling of the London Eye in London.

Main construction work on Cardiff Bay Barrage completed.

More than 20% of the UK population (over 12 million people) now have internet access.

Television

BBC1

8 January – SMart on the Road (1999–2003)
12 January – Holby City (1999–present)
16 January – Sunburn (1999–2000)
22 June – Hope and Glory (1999–2000)
4 October – Walking with Dinosaurs (1999)

BBC2

11 January – The League of Gentlemen (1999–2002)
29 April – The Planets (1999)

ITV

Power Rangers Light Speed Rescue (1999–2001)
8 March – ITV Nightly News (1999–2001)
The Grimleys (1999–2001)
8 April – Tonight (1999–present)
19 May – Pride of Britain Awards (1999–present)
1 June – Bad Girls (1999–2006)
7 June – Always and Everyone (1999–2002)
6 September – Loose Women (1999–present)
28 September – Watership Down (1999–2000)
20 December – Dark Ages (1999)
26 December – Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids (1999–present)

Channel 4

23 February – Queer as Folk (1999–2000)
29 April – Grand Designs (1999–present)
6 May – Psychos (1999)
17 July – Late Night Poker (1999–2002, 2007–2011)
19 September – Smack the Pony (1999–2003)
24 September – Spaced (1999–2001)
17 October – Bremner, Bird and Fortune (1999–2010)

Channel 5

24 April – The Tribe (1999–2003)
13 July – House Doctor (1999–2003)
30 October – Harry and Cosh (1999–2003)
7 December – Winter Angel (1999)

Charts Number-one singles

"Heartbeat" / "Tragedy" – Steps
"Praise You" – Fatboy Slim
"A Little Bit More" – 911
"Pretty Fly (for a White Guy)" – The Offspring
"You Don’t Know Me" – Armand Van Helden feat. Duane Harden
"Maria" – Blondie
"Fly Away" – Lenny Kravitz
"…Baby One More Time" – Britney Spears
"When the Going Gets Tough, the Tough Get Going" – Boyzone
"Blame It on the Weatherman" – B*Witched
"Flat Beat" – Mr. Oizo
"Perfect Moment" – Martine McCutcheon
"Swear It Again" – Westlife
"I Want It That Way" – Backstreet Boys
"You Needed Me" – Boyzone
"Sweet Like Chocolate" – Shanks & Bigfoot
"Everybody’s Free (To Wear Sunscreen)" – Baz Luhrmann
"Bring It All Back" – S Club 7
"Boom Boom Boom Boom" – Vengaboys
"9pm (Till I Come)"A.T.B."Livin’ la Vida Loca" – Ricky Martin
"When You Say Nothing at All" – Ronan Keating
"If I Let You Go" – Westlife
"Mi Chico Latino" – Geri Halliwell
"Mambo No. 5 (A Little Bit of…)" – Lou Bega
"We’re Going to Ibiza" – Vengaboys
"Blue (Da Ba Dee)" – Eiffel 65
"Genie in a Bottle" – Christina Aguilera
"Flying Without Wings" – Westlife
"Keep on Movin’" – Five
"Lift Me Up" – Geri Halliwell
"She’s the One" / "It’s Only Us" – Robbie Williams
"King of My Castle" – Wamdue Project
"The Millennium Prayer" – Cliff Richard
"I Have a Dream" / "Seasons in the Sun" – Westlife

Posted by brizzle born and bred on 2015-06-01 18:23:27

Tagged: , That Was the Year That Was – 1999