IMG_5445

IMG_5445

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:33:14

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5417

IMG_5417

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:32:59

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5428

IMG_5428

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:33:04

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5413

IMG_5413

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:32:57

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5426

IMG_5426

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:33:03

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5414

IMG_5414

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:32:57

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5412

IMG_5412

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:32:57

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5416

IMG_5416

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:32:58

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

Front of 2002 Mercedes-Benz CLK-Class AMG

Front of 2002 Mercedes-Benz CLK-Class AMG

SOLD

Internet Special: $13,500

Year: 2002
Mileage: 69,525
Make: Mercedes-Benz
Interior: Charcoal
Model: CLK-Class
Exterior: Brilliant Silver Metallic
Engine: 5.5L SOHC SMPI 24-Valve Aluminum-Alloy V8 Engine
Stock Number: 14049
VIN Number: WDBLK74G92T128695

Description

This Low Mileage CLK55 AMG Cabriolet is in showroom condition inside and out. This AMG powered CLK has been serviced in our shop and is ready for a new home. The flawless optional black Designo interior will impress, and the brilliant silver exterior has been waxed to perfection. Sport AMG wheels wrapped in like new rubber. Very low mile Clk with all the right options & in excellent condition.

Vehicle Equipment

Standard Equipment

EMISSIONS CERTIFICATION
* LEV certified (5.5L engine/5-speed auto trans)

EPA FUEL ECONOMY RATINGS
* City 16/hwy 22 (5.5L engine/5-speed auto trans)

EXTERIOR
* Dual pwr heated exterior mirrors w/driver-side 3-position memory, RH side mirror w/reverse dip-down, LH auto dimming mirror
* Rain-sensing automatic intermittent windshield wipers
* Single rear fog lamp
* Pwr rear window sunshade
* Pwr insulated convertible top w/glass rear window
* Heated windshield washer nozzles
* Xenon high-intensity-discharge headlamps w/auto level control
* AMG front air dam, side skirts, rear apron

INTERIOR
* Multifunction display-inc: unfastened seat belt, exterior lamp failure, brake system/parking brake, front brake pad wear, SRS, ABS, Brake Assist, ASR, ESP, & low fuel/engine oil/coolant/washer fluid levels
* Instrument panel-inc: speedometer, tachometer, trip odometer, fuel/temperature gauges, quartz clock, outside temperature indicator
* Lamps-inc: front passenger reading, delayed shutoff courtesy
* AM/FM/weatherband/cassette stereo w/antitheft coding & CD changer/cellular telephone controls
* Rear head restraints integral w/rollover sensing pop-up roll bars
* Dual illuminated visor vanity mirrors
* Velour carpeting & front/rear floor mats
* Heated rear window
* Pwr windows w/1-touch express-down, all 4 windows down w/pwr top switch
* Anti-theft system-inc: central locking, transponder-encoded ignition key, engine immobilizer
* Automatic dual-zone climate control w/dust/charcoal filter, residual heat feature
* Integrated garage door opener
* SmartKey 4 button remote locking system w/trunk release, panic alarm, valet lockout
* Leather-wrapped steering wheel w/manually telescoping steering column
* Remote illuminated entry system
* Front 10-way pwr bucket seats w/3-memory presets
* 2 cup holders
* Storage pockets in both doors, dash
* Auto dimming rear view mirror
* Leather upholstery
* Wind deflector
* Multicontour heated front seats w/pneumatic supports
* 6 speaker Bose sound system w/speed sensitive volume adjustment
* Black birdseye maple trim on doors, dash, console, shift gate
* Pwr door locks
* Cruise control

MECHANICAL
* 17" x 7.5" front/17" x 8.5" rear 5 spoke AMG monoblock alloy wheels
* Sport-tuned AMG suspension-inc: Bilstein shock absorbers, progressive- rate coil springs, larger stabilizer bars
* Full size spare tire
* 225/45ZR17 front performance BSW tires
* Automatic slip regulation traction control system (ASR)
* Electronic Stability Program (ESP)
* 245/40ZR17 rear performance BSW tires
* 5.5L SOHC SMPI 24-valve aluminum-alloy V8 engine
* Pwr recirculating ball steering w/integrated damper
* Independent double wishbone front suspension w/triangular lower control arms, antidive geometry
* Rear wheel drive
* Independent 5-arm multi-link rear suspension w/anti-lift/anti-squat/alignment control
* 5-speed automatic transmission-inc: driver-adaptive computer control, OD, winter mode select for forward & reverse starts
* Pwr ventilated 4-wheel disc brakes

SAFETY
* Automatic-deploying rollbar
* Automatic Slip Regulation traction control system (ASR)
* Brake assist system (applies full braking pwr automatically when needed)
* Height-adjustable 3-point seat belts w/emergency tensioning retractors & belt force limiters
* Anti-lock braking system (ABS)
* Crumple-zone body structure
* Door mounted side impact airbags
* Dual front airbags w/BabySmart auto passenger-side airbag deactivation
* 9 mph automatic door locks

Standard Equipment

EMISSIONS CERTIFICATION
* LEV certified (5.5L engine/5-speed auto trans)

EPA FUEL ECONOMY RATINGS
* City 16/hwy 22 (5.5L engine/5-speed auto trans)

EXTERIOR
* Dual pwr heated exterior mirrors w/driver-side 3-position memory, RH side mirror w/reverse dip-down, LH auto dimming mirror
* Rain-sensing automatic intermittent windshield wipers
* Single rear fog lamp
* Pwr rear window sunshade
* Pwr insulated convertible top w/glass rear window
* Heated windshield washer nozzles
* Xenon high-intensity-discharge headlamps w/auto level control
* AMG front air dam, side skirts, rear apron

INTERIOR
* Multifunction display-inc: unfastened seat belt, exterior lamp failure, brake system/parking brake, front brake pad wear, SRS, ABS, Brake Assist, ASR, ESP, & low fuel/engine oil/coolant/washer fluid levels
* Instrument panel-inc: speedometer, tachometer, trip odometer, fuel/temperature gauges, quartz clock, outside temperature indicator
* Lamps-inc: front passenger reading, delayed shutoff courtesy
* AM/FM/weatherband/cassette stereo w/antitheft coding & CD changer/cellular telephone controls
* Rear head restraints integral w/rollover sensing pop-up roll bars
* Dual illuminated visor vanity mirrors
* Velour carpeting & front/rear floor mats
* Heated rear window
* Pwr windows w/1-touch express-down, all 4 windows down w/pwr top switch
* Anti-theft system-inc: central locking, transponder-encoded ignition key, engine immobilizer
* Automatic dual-zone climate control w/dust/charcoal filter, residual heat feature
* Integrated garage door opener
* SmartKey 4 button remote locking system w/trunk release, panic alarm, valet lockout
* Leather-wrapped steering wheel w/manually telescoping steering column
* Remote illuminated entry system
* Front 10-way pwr bucket seats w/3-memory presets
* 2 cup holders
* Storage pockets in both doors, dash
* Auto dimming rear view mirror
* Leather upholstery
* Wind deflector
* Multicontour heated front seats w/pneumatic supports
* 6 speaker Bose sound system w/speed sensitive volume adjustment
* Black birdseye maple trim on doors, dash, console, shift gate
* Pwr door locks
* Cruise control

MECHANICAL
* 17" x 7.5" front/17" x 8.5" rear 5 spoke AMG monoblock alloy wheels
* Sport-tuned AMG suspension-inc: Bilstein shock absorbers, progressive- rate coil springs, larger stabilizer bars
* Full size spare tire
* 225/45ZR17 front performance BSW tires
* Automatic slip regulation traction control system (ASR)
* Electronic Stability Program (ESP)
* 245/40ZR17 rear performance BSW tires
* 5.5L SOHC SMPI 24-valve aluminum-alloy V8 engine
* Pwr recirculating ball steering w/integrated damper
* Independent double wishbone front suspension w/triangular lower control arms, antidive geometry
* Rear wheel drive
* Independent 5-arm multi-link rear suspension w/anti-lift/anti-squat/alignment control
* 5-speed automatic transmission-inc: driver-adaptive computer control, OD, winter mode select for forward & reverse starts
* Pwr ventilated 4-wheel disc brakes

SAFETY
* Automatic-deploying rollbar
* Automatic Slip Regulation traction control system (ASR)
* Brake assist system (applies full braking pwr automatically when needed)
* Height-adjustable 3-point seat belts w/emergency tensioning retractors & belt force limiters
* Anti-lock braking system (ABS)
* Crumple-zone body structure
* Door mounted side impact airbags
* Dual front airbags w/BabySmart auto passenger-side airbag deactivation
* 9 mph automatic door locks

Posted by Alec Frazier on 2014-12-05 16:04:57

Tagged: , mechanics , collectable , car , Buffalo , NY , Four M Sales Inc , Four M , Four M Sales , automobile , New York , WNY , Erie County , US , USA , America , United States , United States of America , NY State , State of New York , City of Buffalo , New York State , Upstate , Upstate NY , Upstate New York , Western NY , Western New York

A World Away…

A World Away...

This picture is largely based on the last time I ever saw the Twin Towers, which was in January 2000. We had just celebrated the Millennium in Clearwater, Florida, and were flying back to Europe via New York JFK, which we flew to aboard a Delta Airlines Boeing 727. As we made out final approaches to JFK International, I managed to see a view very similar to this, with the skyscrapers of Manhattan sillhouetted against the setting sun. But because I have such little detailed memory of this beautiful moment in my life, I decided to take my lead from this astounding picture below, which is also taken from a Delta Airlines Boeing 727, but only this one is landing at La Guardia:

www.airliners.net/photo/Delta-Air-Lines/Boeing-727-232-Ad…

Yes I know it’s another World Trade Center one, and at this rate I’m going to offend every American follower I have, but there is quite an interesting story to this picture. I actually scribbled this drawing down in 2009 because I was going to make it my masterpiece of masterpieces, and I really wanted to show my Grandma it too. I did the initial drawing and scanned it and was going to make a start on coloring it in, but all kinds of real life distractions pulled me away, such as schoolwork and whatnot. And so for 4 years this sat on my computer in my pictures folder, occasionally with me peering over it but largely forgotten about. At some points I was even tempted to delete it because I felt I would never get round to finishing it.

But last weekend I decided that I was sick and tired of this thing being sat on my computer gathering dust, so I decided to finish it off. However, to my everlasting shame I finished it three years too late for my Grandma to ever see as she sadly passed away in 2010, leaving me with something I had promised myself to complete, but never got round to in time. I hope one day when we meet in a better place I will finally be able to show my Grandma the drawing I devoted to her.

Posted by Rorymacve Part II on 2013-11-21 22:14:50

Tagged: , World Trade Center , Twin Towers , WTC , New York , New York City , NYC , Manhattan , Sunset , Evening , Sky , Delta Airlines , Boeing 727 , La Guardia , Aircraft , Flying , Flight , Landing , Approach , Boeing , Jetliner , Jet , USA , United States of America , Airport