Orion and the running man

Orion and the running man

After a few months waiting for it, I finally got to play with my new telescope and I revisited The Orion Nebula (M42). This time, I could include the Running Man Nebula as well (NGC 1977). Their light took roughly 1500 years to cross space and hit the sensor of my camera. I am very pleased as I could gather much more information this time. Considering that the moon was 97% illuminated yesterday night, I didn’t think I could be able to salvage these details. Looking forward to some clear and dark nights.
For those interested in the technical details, this is a stack of the best 50% of 78 light frames, stacked with 20 dark frames (used to reduce the heat noise from long exposures), 20 flat frames (to reduce vignetting and dust), as well as 20 bias frames (used to detect camera noise and dead pixels). The camera is an EOS 550d modified for astrophotography.
Taking the photos was the quick part (fortunately as it was just about to freeze last night). A couple of computer hours were necessary to bring all the details out.

Posted by Christian Gloor (mostly) underwater photographer on 2019-03-20 16:17:42

Tagged: , Orion , running , man , nebula , M42 , M43 , space , astrophotography , night , telescope , Celestron

Released to Public: Panoramic Hubble Image for 17th Launch Anniversary (NASA)

Released to Public: Panoramic Hubble Image for 17th Launch Anniversary (NASA)

Public Domain. Credit for Hubble image: NASA, ESA, N. Smith (University of California, Berkeley), and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA). Credit for CTIO image: N. Smith (University of California, Berkeley) and NOAO/AURA/NSF . For more information Visit NASA’s Multimedia Gallery You may wish to consult NASA’s
image use guidelines. If you plan to use an image and especially if you are considering any commercial usage, you should be aware that some restrictions may apply.
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NOTE: In most cases, NASA does not assert copyright protection for its images, but proper attribution may be required. This may be to NASA or various agencies and individuals that may work on any number of projects with NASA. Please DO NOT ATTRIBUTE TO PINGNEWS. You may say found via pingnews but pingnews is neither the creator nor the owner of these materials.
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Additional information from source:

In celebration of the 17th anniversary of the launch and deployment of NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope, a team of astronomers is releasing one of the largest panoramic images ever taken with Hubble’s cameras. It is a 50-light-year-wide view of the central region of the Carina Nebula where a maelstrom of star birth – and death – is taking place.

Hubble’s view of the nebula shows star birth in a new level of detail. The fantasy-like landscape of the nebula is sculpted by the action of outflowing winds and scorching ultraviolet radiation from the monster stars that inhabit this inferno. In the process, these stars are shredding the surrounding material that is the last vestige of the giant cloud from which the stars were born.

The immense nebula contains at least a dozen brilliant stars that are roughly estimated to be at least 50 to 100 times the mass of our Sun. The most unique and opulent inhabitant is the star Eta Carinae, at far left. Eta Carinae is in the final stages of its brief and eruptive lifespan, as evidenced by two billowing lobes of gas and dust that presage its upcoming explosion as a titanic supernova.

The fireworks in the Carina region started three million years ago when the nebula’s first generation of newborn stars condensed and ignited in the middle of a huge cloud of cold molecular hydrogen. Radiation from these stars carved out an expanding bubble of hot gas. The island-like clumps of dark clouds scattered across the nebula are nodules of dust and gas that are resisting being eaten away by photoionization.

The hurricane blast of stellar winds and blistering ultraviolet radiation within the cavity is now compressing the surrounding walls of cold hydrogen. This is triggering a second stage of new star formation.

Our Sun and our solar system may have been born inside such a cosmic crucible 4.6 billion years ago. In looking at the Carina Nebula we are seeing the genesis of star making as it commonly occurs along the dense spiral arms of a galaxy.

The immense nebula is an estimated 7,500 light-years away in the southern constellation Carina the Keel (of the old southern constellation Argo Navis, the ship of Jason and the Argonauts, from Greek mythology).

This image is a mosaic of the Carina Nebula assembled from 48 frames taken with Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys. The Hubble images were taken in the light of neutral hydrogen. Color information was added with data taken at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) in Chile. Red corresponds to sulfur, green to hydrogen, and blue to oxygen emission.

Credit for Hubble image: NASA, ESA, N. Smith (University of California, Berkeley), and The Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)
Credit for CTIO image: N. Smith (University of California, Berkeley) and NOAO/AURA/NSF

Interesting Hubble Facts

In its 17 years of exploring the heavens, NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has made nearly 800,000 observations and snapped nearly 500,000 images of more than 25,000 celestial objects. Hubble does not travel to stars, planets and galaxies. It takes pictures of them as it whirls around Earth at 17,500 miles an hour. In its 17-year lifetime, the telescope has made nearly 100,000 trips around our planet. Those trips have racked up plenty of frequent-flier-miles, about 2.4 billion, which is the equivalent of a round trip to Saturn.

The 17 years’ worth of observations has produced more than 30 terabytes of data, equal to about 25 percent of the information stored in the Library of Congress. Each day the orbiting observatory generates about 10 gigabytes of data, enough information to fill the hard drive of a typical home computer in two weeks. The Hubble archive sends about 66 gigabytes of data each day to astronomers throughout the world.

Astronomers using Hubble data have published nearly 7,000 scientific papers, making it one of the most productive scientific instruments ever built.

Posted by pingnews.com on 2007-04-28 02:29:00

Tagged: , nasa , space , stars , hubble , telescope , Launch , Anniversary , heritage , hubble space telescope , panorama , panoramic , carina , nebula , astronomer , light-year , pingnews , pingnews.com , royalty-free , stock , photo , foto , archive , library , digital , image , archival , news , stockphoto , astronomy , public , public domain , nasa.gov , media , space for all , stockfoto , creative_commons , via pingnews , cc , stock photography

Don’t Fall For These 24 Myths About Facebook Ads [Free Guide] http://bit.ly/2q0EA6L

Don’t Fall For These 24 Myths About Facebook Ads [Free Guide] http://bit.ly/2q0EA6L

bit.ly/2rvuInv

Posted by brandready on 2017-05-18 16:55:18

Tagged: , Inbound , Marketing , WordPress , Astronomy , Telescope , Cloudscape , Glowing , Star Chart , Moon Surface , Illustration , Andromeda Galaxy , Abstract , Constellation , Dust , Orbiting , Exploding , Computer Graphic , Backgrounds , Spiral , Infinity , Imagination , Fantasy , Star Shape , Dark , Purple , Blue , Black Color , Crowded , Deep , Science , Nature , Night , Light – Natural Phenomenon , Galaxy , Star – Space , Nebula , Earth , Planet – Space , Moon , Space , Cloud – Sky , Sun , Sky , Street , Astronomy Telescope , milky , outer , Plasma , Gas , Wallpaper Pattern , Astrology , Planetary Moon

Telescope on the grass Under the Stars Astronomy

Telescope on the grass Under the Stars Astronomy

Telescope on the grass Under the Stars background

Astronomy (from Greek: αστρονομία) is a natural science that studies celestial objects and phenomena. It applies mathematics, physics, and chemistry, in an effort to explain the origin of those objects and phenomena and their evolution. Objects of interest include planets, moons, stars, galaxies, and comets; while the phenomena include supernova explosions, gamma ray bursts, and cosmic microwave background radiation. More generally, all astronomical phenomena that originate outside Earth’s atmosphere are within the purview of astronomy. A related but distinct subject, physical cosmology, is concerned with the study of the Universe as a whole.
Astronomy is the oldest of the natural sciences. The early civilizations in recorded history, such as the Babylonians, Greeks, Indians, Egyptians, Nubians, Iranians, Chinese, and Maya performed methodical observations of the night sky. Historically, astronomy has included disciplines as diverse as astrometry, celestial navigation, observational astronomy and the making of calendars, but professional astronomy is now often considered to be synonymous with astrophysics.
During the 20th century, the field of professional astronomy split into observational and theoretical branches. Observational astronomy is focused on acquiring data from observations of astronomical objects, which is then analyzed using basic principles of physics. Theoretical astronomy is oriented toward the development of computer or analytical models to describe astronomical objects and phenomena. The two fields complement each other, with theoretical astronomy seeking to explain the observational results and observations being used to confirm theoretical results.
Astronomy is one of the few sciences where amateurs can still play an active role, especially in the discovery and observation of transient phenomena. Amateur astronomers have made and contributed to many important astronomical discoveries, such as finding new comets.

Posted by scienceandtechnologysu on 2017-07-12 00:24:17

Tagged: , abstract , astrology , astronomy , atmosphere , background , black , blue , bright , clear , clouds , cluster , color , cosmos , deep , dusk , earth , explosion , fantasy , galaxy , graphic , idyllic , illustration , light , many , moon , nebula , night , open , orbit , outer , planet , pleiades , pure , science , shine , shiny , sky , solar , space , sparkle , star , starry , stars , grass , telescope , twinkle , universe , wallpaper , way , white , Thailand , Planets , Gases , Universal , dust , Dark , matter

r0011519

r0011519

The server room had been full of vaxen and terminals a couple of days ago. It’s still full of interdata spares, but they’re going very soon. Tomorrow, we hope. I wish I got some photos when the raised floor was pulled and we were covered in dust, but I must have been too busy.

Posted by space lama on 2009-02-10 12:35:52

Tagged: , decommissioning , retrocomputing , interdata , computer control , telescope , AAT , Perkin-Elmer , Model70

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

‘The Dish’ is a well known Australian movie about how this radio telescope at Parkes, NSW, played a major role covering the moon landing in 1969.

I had seen both the movie and some amazing images taken by Simon, a member of Barossa Photography Club so I thought I would also give it a go. Each of these exposures took about 30 minutes – I didn’t get there until nearly 10pm so these (and some which didn’t work out) meant it was getting very late when I finished!

From: www.csiro.au/Portals/Education/Programs/Parkes-Radio-Tele…

The Telescope

CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope is a 64-m diameter parabolic dish used for radio astronomy. It is located about 20 km north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), and about 380 km west of Sydney.

It is operated by CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), a business unit of CSIRO. CASS also operates the Australia Telescope Compact Array near Narrabri, NSW, and the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and is developing the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope in Western Australia.

The telescope was built in 1961, but only its basic structure has remained unchanged. The surface, control system, focus cabin, receivers, computers and cabling have all been upgraded – some parts many times – to keep the telescope current.

The telescope is now ten thousand times more sensitive than when commissioned in 1961.
Using the Telescope

The telescope operates twenty four hours per day, through rain and cloud. About 85 per cent of all time each year is scheduled for observing. Less than five per cent of that is lost because of high winds or equipment problems. Most of the rest of the time each year is used for maintenance and testing. Around 300 researchers use the telescope each year, and more than 40 per cent of these users are from overseas.

The moving part of the dish is not fixed to the top of the tower but just sits on it. Because the large surface catches the wind like a sail, the telescope must be ‘stowed’ (pointed directly up) when the wind exceeds 35 km an hour.
Radio Astronomy

The radio waves from objects in space are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. The power received from a strong cosmic radio source by the Parkes telescope is about a hundredth of a millionth of a millionth of a watt (10-14 W). If you wanted to heat water with this power it would take about 70 000 years to heat one drop by one degree Celsius.

Galaxies contain stars, gas and dust. The gas – mostly hydrogen – is the raw material from which stars form. It emits radio waves, at a frequency of 1420 MHz. Radio astronomers spend a lot of time studying this gas, learning where it is and how it is moving.

Astronomers don’t look through the telescope. Instead, signal processing systems and computers take the radio waves the telescope collects and turns them into pictures (like photographs) of objects in space.

I was very lucky to get the loan of a car and drive to Sydney – a distance of some 1,400 kilometers (around 750 miles). Having seen some amazing night shots of the radio telescope at Parkes, I decided to go that way and spend my first night at Parkes.

Posted by Strabanephotos on 2013-09-09 07:12:54

Tagged: , The , Dish , CSIRO , Radio , Telescope , Parkes , New , South , Wales , Australia , nsw , monday , 2nd , september , 2013 , long , exposure , star , trails , celestial , pole

Stars circling around the Celestial South Pole, The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

Stars circling around the Celestial South Pole, The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

‘The Dish’ is a well known Australian movie about how this radio telescope at Parkes, NSW, played a major role covering the moon landing in 1969.

I had seen both the movie and some amazing images taken by Simon, a member of Barossa Photography Club so I thought I would also give it a go. Each of these exposures took about 30 minutes – I didn’t get there until nearly 10pm so these (and some which didn’t work out) meant it was getting very late when I finished!

From: www.csiro.au/Portals/Education/Programs/Parkes-Radio-Tele…

The Telescope

CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope is a 64-m diameter parabolic dish used for radio astronomy. It is located about 20 km north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), and about 380 km west of Sydney.

It is operated by CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), a business unit of CSIRO. CASS also operates the Australia Telescope Compact Array near Narrabri, NSW, and the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and is developing the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope in Western Australia.

The telescope was built in 1961, but only its basic structure has remained unchanged. The surface, control system, focus cabin, receivers, computers and cabling have all been upgraded – some parts many times – to keep the telescope current.

The telescope is now ten thousand times more sensitive than when commissioned in 1961.
Using the Telescope

The telescope operates twenty four hours per day, through rain and cloud. About 85 per cent of all time each year is scheduled for observing. Less than five per cent of that is lost because of high winds or equipment problems. Most of the rest of the time each year is used for maintenance and testing. Around 300 researchers use the telescope each year, and more than 40 per cent of these users are from overseas.

The moving part of the dish is not fixed to the top of the tower but just sits on it. Because the large surface catches the wind like a sail, the telescope must be ‘stowed’ (pointed directly up) when the wind exceeds 35 km an hour.
Radio Astronomy

The radio waves from objects in space are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. The power received from a strong cosmic radio source by the Parkes telescope is about a hundredth of a millionth of a millionth of a watt (10-14 W). If you wanted to heat water with this power it would take about 70 000 years to heat one drop by one degree Celsius.

Galaxies contain stars, gas and dust. The gas – mostly hydrogen – is the raw material from which stars form. It emits radio waves, at a frequency of 1420 MHz. Radio astronomers spend a lot of time studying this gas, learning where it is and how it is moving.

Astronomers don’t look through the telescope. Instead, signal processing systems and computers take the radio waves the telescope collects and turns them into pictures (like photographs) of objects in space.

I was very lucky to get the loan of a car and drive to Sydney – a distance of some 1,400 kilometers (around 750 miles). Having seen some amazing night shots of the radio telescope at Parkes, I decided to go that way and spend my first night at Parkes.

Posted by Strabanephotos on 2013-09-09 07:13:00

Tagged: , The , Dish , CSIRO , Radio , Telescope , Parkes , New , South , Wales , Australia , nsw , monday , 2nd , september , 2013 , long , exposure , star , trails , celestial , pole

Jupiter

Jupiter

We didn’t end up looking through the main telescopes until the very end of the night, after the wonderful science lecture on "active galaxies" and black holes. (Some parts were difficult to follow, but the lecturer, David Rosario, was fairly good at explaining most of it.) The best part was a video of a star getting sling-shot around the center of a galaxy with nothing visibly present there, presumably indicating a black hole.

I enjoyed the ambience of the 36" dome more than the image I saw through it. It was neat seeing the stars, but without having too much knowledge, it may has well have been a cloud of dust.

The 40" telescope is in a very cramped room, so the ambience wasn’t the most appealing part of it. In this case, the telescope was pointed at Jupiter–something I could relate to at least. It was a bit blurry, and because of atmospheric disturbance a little shaky.

In both rooms, I tried taking some long exposures. None of them really turned out, but it was funny how many of the astronomers said "This is a stupid question, but that doesn’t have a flash, right?" (Or, in the 40", "If that has a flash, I’m going to…") When viewing through the telescopes, the rooms are kept dark with only red light allowed. A flash would have blinded everyone. (If I didn’t have the 5D, which doesn’t have a built-in flash, I probably would not have taken any pictures, worrying I’d somehow screw up turning the flash off.)

At the end, one of the astronomers asked if I wanted to take a picture through the telescope. I hadn’t even thought about it, but why not? It’s just a really powerful telephoto, right? They suggested some settings (which I used), and I just held the lens up to the eyepiece (which was specially installed for viewings like on this night; normally they use a computer), and snapped.

The image isn’t too clear, but it’s still pretty cool capturing the memory of looking through the scope.

I actually captured one of the moons, but Jupiter was overexposed. To bring out Jupiter more, I had to sacrifice the moon.

I think the history lecture helped me appreciate viewing Jupiter more. One of the moons (Amalthea) was discovered at the Lick Observatory, the first moon discovered since Galileo (though that was through the 36").

Posted by mrjoro on 2007-06-26 15:49:20

Tagged: , mthamilton , lickobservatory , santaclaracounty , diablomountains , summervisitorsprogram , observatory , jupiter , telescope , throughthetelescope , 40inchreflector , planet , starred , San Jose , California , United States of America

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

The dish was continually moving – usually by small amounts, presumably as the stars moved – but it the middle of a 30 minute exposure it made a huge movement. So the dish is turning round, you can see the stars moving round, the earth is spinning – made me feel quite dizzy 🙂

‘The Dish’ is a well known Australian movie about how this radio telescope at Parkes, NSW, played a major role covering the moon landing in 1969.

I had seen both the movie and some amazing images taken by Simon, a member of Barossa Photography Club so I thought I would also give it a go. Each of these exposures took about 30 minutes – I didn’t get there until nearly 10pm so these (and some which didn’t work out) meant it was getting very late when I finished!

From: www.csiro.au/Portals/Education/Programs/Parkes-Radio-Tele…

The Telescope

CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope is a 64-m diameter parabolic dish used for radio astronomy. It is located about 20 km north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), and about 380 km west of Sydney.

It is operated by CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), a business unit of CSIRO. CASS also operates the Australia Telescope Compact Array near Narrabri, NSW, and the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and is developing the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope in Western Australia.

The telescope was built in 1961, but only its basic structure has remained unchanged. The surface, control system, focus cabin, receivers, computers and cabling have all been upgraded – some parts many times – to keep the telescope current.

The telescope is now ten thousand times more sensitive than when commissioned in 1961.
Using the Telescope

The telescope operates twenty four hours per day, through rain and cloud. About 85 per cent of all time each year is scheduled for observing. Less than five per cent of that is lost because of high winds or equipment problems. Most of the rest of the time each year is used for maintenance and testing. Around 300 researchers use the telescope each year, and more than 40 per cent of these users are from overseas.

The moving part of the dish is not fixed to the top of the tower but just sits on it. Because the large surface catches the wind like a sail, the telescope must be ‘stowed’ (pointed directly up) when the wind exceeds 35 km an hour.
Radio Astronomy

The radio waves from objects in space are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. The power received from a strong cosmic radio source by the Parkes telescope is about a hundredth of a millionth of a millionth of a watt (10-14 W). If you wanted to heat water with this power it would take about 70 000 years to heat one drop by one degree Celsius.

Galaxies contain stars, gas and dust. The gas – mostly hydrogen – is the raw material from which stars form. It emits radio waves, at a frequency of 1420 MHz. Radio astronomers spend a lot of time studying this gas, learning where it is and how it is moving.

Astronomers don’t look through the telescope. Instead, signal processing systems and computers take the radio waves the telescope collects and turns them into pictures (like photographs) of objects in space.

I was very lucky to get the loan of a car and drive to Sydney – a distance of some 1,400 kilometers (around 750 miles). Having seen some amazing night shots of the radio telescope at Parkes, I decided to go that way and spend my first night at Parkes.

Posted by Strabanephotos on 2013-09-09 07:13:06

Tagged: , The , Dish , CSIRO , Radio , Telescope , Parkes , New , South , Wales , Australia , nsw , monday , 2nd , september , 2013 , long , exposure , star , trails , celestial , pole