Storm coming in over the river Murry – South Australia.

Storm coming in over the river Murry - South Australia.

A wild day whilst on our houseboat trip up the River Murray South Australia, this was a combination of a very nasty fire front and the smoke, dust and storm front that was blown our way…the previous photo was sent from my I pad with no adjustments whilst there, I couldn’t wait to get home and upload on my computer and add some color and contrast to the photo as was seen on the day.
I had to remove the old one as it was out of focus and poorly done, prob with old eyes and small screens – lol

Posted by Mykel46 on 2015-11-27 10:27:48

Tagged: , storm , river , murray , South , Australia , nature , wild , weather , Olympus , OMD , EM5mk2 , 7-14mm , f2.8 , pro

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

‘The Dish’ is a well known Australian movie about how this radio telescope at Parkes, NSW, played a major role covering the moon landing in 1969.

I had seen both the movie and some amazing images taken by Simon, a member of Barossa Photography Club so I thought I would also give it a go. Each of these exposures took about 30 minutes – I didn’t get there until nearly 10pm so these (and some which didn’t work out) meant it was getting very late when I finished!

From: www.csiro.au/Portals/Education/Programs/Parkes-Radio-Tele…

The Telescope

CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope is a 64-m diameter parabolic dish used for radio astronomy. It is located about 20 km north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), and about 380 km west of Sydney.

It is operated by CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), a business unit of CSIRO. CASS also operates the Australia Telescope Compact Array near Narrabri, NSW, and the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and is developing the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope in Western Australia.

The telescope was built in 1961, but only its basic structure has remained unchanged. The surface, control system, focus cabin, receivers, computers and cabling have all been upgraded – some parts many times – to keep the telescope current.

The telescope is now ten thousand times more sensitive than when commissioned in 1961.
Using the Telescope

The telescope operates twenty four hours per day, through rain and cloud. About 85 per cent of all time each year is scheduled for observing. Less than five per cent of that is lost because of high winds or equipment problems. Most of the rest of the time each year is used for maintenance and testing. Around 300 researchers use the telescope each year, and more than 40 per cent of these users are from overseas.

The moving part of the dish is not fixed to the top of the tower but just sits on it. Because the large surface catches the wind like a sail, the telescope must be ‘stowed’ (pointed directly up) when the wind exceeds 35 km an hour.
Radio Astronomy

The radio waves from objects in space are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. The power received from a strong cosmic radio source by the Parkes telescope is about a hundredth of a millionth of a millionth of a watt (10-14 W). If you wanted to heat water with this power it would take about 70 000 years to heat one drop by one degree Celsius.

Galaxies contain stars, gas and dust. The gas – mostly hydrogen – is the raw material from which stars form. It emits radio waves, at a frequency of 1420 MHz. Radio astronomers spend a lot of time studying this gas, learning where it is and how it is moving.

Astronomers don’t look through the telescope. Instead, signal processing systems and computers take the radio waves the telescope collects and turns them into pictures (like photographs) of objects in space.

I was very lucky to get the loan of a car and drive to Sydney – a distance of some 1,400 kilometers (around 750 miles). Having seen some amazing night shots of the radio telescope at Parkes, I decided to go that way and spend my first night at Parkes.

Posted by Strabanephotos on 2013-09-09 07:12:54

Tagged: , The , Dish , CSIRO , Radio , Telescope , Parkes , New , South , Wales , Australia , nsw , monday , 2nd , september , 2013 , long , exposure , star , trails , celestial , pole

Stars circling around the Celestial South Pole, The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

Stars circling around the Celestial South Pole, The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

‘The Dish’ is a well known Australian movie about how this radio telescope at Parkes, NSW, played a major role covering the moon landing in 1969.

I had seen both the movie and some amazing images taken by Simon, a member of Barossa Photography Club so I thought I would also give it a go. Each of these exposures took about 30 minutes – I didn’t get there until nearly 10pm so these (and some which didn’t work out) meant it was getting very late when I finished!

From: www.csiro.au/Portals/Education/Programs/Parkes-Radio-Tele…

The Telescope

CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope is a 64-m diameter parabolic dish used for radio astronomy. It is located about 20 km north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), and about 380 km west of Sydney.

It is operated by CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), a business unit of CSIRO. CASS also operates the Australia Telescope Compact Array near Narrabri, NSW, and the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and is developing the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope in Western Australia.

The telescope was built in 1961, but only its basic structure has remained unchanged. The surface, control system, focus cabin, receivers, computers and cabling have all been upgraded – some parts many times – to keep the telescope current.

The telescope is now ten thousand times more sensitive than when commissioned in 1961.
Using the Telescope

The telescope operates twenty four hours per day, through rain and cloud. About 85 per cent of all time each year is scheduled for observing. Less than five per cent of that is lost because of high winds or equipment problems. Most of the rest of the time each year is used for maintenance and testing. Around 300 researchers use the telescope each year, and more than 40 per cent of these users are from overseas.

The moving part of the dish is not fixed to the top of the tower but just sits on it. Because the large surface catches the wind like a sail, the telescope must be ‘stowed’ (pointed directly up) when the wind exceeds 35 km an hour.
Radio Astronomy

The radio waves from objects in space are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. The power received from a strong cosmic radio source by the Parkes telescope is about a hundredth of a millionth of a millionth of a watt (10-14 W). If you wanted to heat water with this power it would take about 70 000 years to heat one drop by one degree Celsius.

Galaxies contain stars, gas and dust. The gas – mostly hydrogen – is the raw material from which stars form. It emits radio waves, at a frequency of 1420 MHz. Radio astronomers spend a lot of time studying this gas, learning where it is and how it is moving.

Astronomers don’t look through the telescope. Instead, signal processing systems and computers take the radio waves the telescope collects and turns them into pictures (like photographs) of objects in space.

I was very lucky to get the loan of a car and drive to Sydney – a distance of some 1,400 kilometers (around 750 miles). Having seen some amazing night shots of the radio telescope at Parkes, I decided to go that way and spend my first night at Parkes.

Posted by Strabanephotos on 2013-09-09 07:13:00

Tagged: , The , Dish , CSIRO , Radio , Telescope , Parkes , New , South , Wales , Australia , nsw , monday , 2nd , september , 2013 , long , exposure , star , trails , celestial , pole

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

The dish was continually moving – usually by small amounts, presumably as the stars moved – but it the middle of a 30 minute exposure it made a huge movement. So the dish is turning round, you can see the stars moving round, the earth is spinning – made me feel quite dizzy πŸ™‚

‘The Dish’ is a well known Australian movie about how this radio telescope at Parkes, NSW, played a major role covering the moon landing in 1969.

I had seen both the movie and some amazing images taken by Simon, a member of Barossa Photography Club so I thought I would also give it a go. Each of these exposures took about 30 minutes – I didn’t get there until nearly 10pm so these (and some which didn’t work out) meant it was getting very late when I finished!

From: www.csiro.au/Portals/Education/Programs/Parkes-Radio-Tele…

The Telescope

CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope is a 64-m diameter parabolic dish used for radio astronomy. It is located about 20 km north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), and about 380 km west of Sydney.

It is operated by CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), a business unit of CSIRO. CASS also operates the Australia Telescope Compact Array near Narrabri, NSW, and the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and is developing the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope in Western Australia.

The telescope was built in 1961, but only its basic structure has remained unchanged. The surface, control system, focus cabin, receivers, computers and cabling have all been upgraded – some parts many times – to keep the telescope current.

The telescope is now ten thousand times more sensitive than when commissioned in 1961.
Using the Telescope

The telescope operates twenty four hours per day, through rain and cloud. About 85 per cent of all time each year is scheduled for observing. Less than five per cent of that is lost because of high winds or equipment problems. Most of the rest of the time each year is used for maintenance and testing. Around 300 researchers use the telescope each year, and more than 40 per cent of these users are from overseas.

The moving part of the dish is not fixed to the top of the tower but just sits on it. Because the large surface catches the wind like a sail, the telescope must be ‘stowed’ (pointed directly up) when the wind exceeds 35 km an hour.
Radio Astronomy

The radio waves from objects in space are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. The power received from a strong cosmic radio source by the Parkes telescope is about a hundredth of a millionth of a millionth of a watt (10-14 W). If you wanted to heat water with this power it would take about 70 000 years to heat one drop by one degree Celsius.

Galaxies contain stars, gas and dust. The gas – mostly hydrogen – is the raw material from which stars form. It emits radio waves, at a frequency of 1420 MHz. Radio astronomers spend a lot of time studying this gas, learning where it is and how it is moving.

Astronomers don’t look through the telescope. Instead, signal processing systems and computers take the radio waves the telescope collects and turns them into pictures (like photographs) of objects in space.

I was very lucky to get the loan of a car and drive to Sydney – a distance of some 1,400 kilometers (around 750 miles). Having seen some amazing night shots of the radio telescope at Parkes, I decided to go that way and spend my first night at Parkes.

Posted by Strabanephotos on 2013-09-09 07:13:06

Tagged: , The , Dish , CSIRO , Radio , Telescope , Parkes , New , South , Wales , Australia , nsw , monday , 2nd , september , 2013 , long , exposure , star , trails , celestial , pole

Cool Roofing: Cooling Down South Florida without Impeding Urban Development

Cool Roofing: Cooling Down South Florida without Impeding Urban Development

Cities are rapidly growing both in terms of population and urban development. While this may be a good thing for a number of reasons like improving lives, it also has its negative effects such as environmental concerns. For starters, one particular spot in the city may be hotter than the rest; experts call it the heat island effect.

British meteorologist Luke Howard first studied the effects of the heat island effect in London in the late 1810s. The heat island effect happens when some parts of a particular area, notably the urban regions, grow warmer than the surrounding countryside. In fact, studies show that sunny days heat roofs and pavement to the point that they’re hotter than the air. Rural zones like small ponds and farms, on the other hand, have temperatures close to the air temperature.

Experts say there are a number of reasons behind the heat island effect, one of them being lack of vegetation. Highly-urbanized areas like the downtown areas tend to get warmer because the lack of trees and plants affects levels of surface moisture. The less moisture there is on the area, the less heat that can be transpired.

Another reason for the heat island effect is the properties of urban materials, namely low albedo or reflectivity. Dark colors of roofs have low albedo, absorbing more of the light than reflecting it back into the atmosphere. On the other hand, lightly-colored roofs are the polar opposite, having high albedo, diffusing the heat.

Lightly-colored roofs are part of a collective solution, called cool roofs, to mitigate the adverse effects of an urban heat island. By using materials (or, in this case, colors) with high reflectivity, much of the heat can be sent back to the atmosphere. South Florida roofers endorse cool roofs, knowing that the state is known for its heat. Another example of cool roofs is the creation of a roof garden to supply the heat island with enough moisture for transpiration.

In the end, it boils down to sustainable roofing practices to reduce the effects of the heat island. With much of the world bound to grow into bustling urban areas soon, urban development must come with ways to be environment friendly. South Florida roofers may provide the starting point for this lifelong endeavor.

For more information on the heat island effect, visit the site of the Environmental Protection Agency at EPA.gov. Ask South Florida general contractors for more details on how you can turn your traditional roof into a cool roof.

For more details, search South Florida roofers and South Florida general contractorsΒ  in Google for related information.

Find More Replicant Urbanism Articles

i may as well declare the dust in my laptop to the ministry of minerals

i may as well declare the dust in my laptop to the ministry of minerals

Posted by dunia duara on 2014-01-03 14:48:48

Tagged: , south sudan , computer , communication , dust , bor , dry season , jonglei , ‘south , sudan’ , INSTAGRAM , Taken with Samsung Galaxy S2 , Africa

Stars circling around the Celestial South Pole, The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

Stars circling around the Celestial South Pole, The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

‘The Dish’ is a well known Australian movie about how this radio telescope at Parkes, NSW, played a major role covering the moon landing in 1969.

I had seen both the movie and some amazing images taken by Simon, a member of Barossa Photography Club so I thought I would also give it a go. Each of these exposures took about 30 minutes – I didn’t get there until nearly 10pm so these (and some which didn’t work out) meant it was getting very late when I finished!

From: www.csiro.au/Portals/Education/Programs/Parkes-Radio-Tele…

The Telescope

CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope is a 64-m diameter parabolic dish used for radio astronomy. It is located about 20 km north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), and about 380 km west of Sydney.

It is operated by CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), a business unit of CSIRO. CASS also operates the Australia Telescope Compact Array near Narrabri, NSW, and the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and is developing the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope in Western Australia.

The telescope was built in 1961, but only its basic structure has remained unchanged. The surface, control system, focus cabin, receivers, computers and cabling have all been upgraded – some parts many times – to keep the telescope current.

The telescope is now ten thousand times more sensitive than when commissioned in 1961.
Using the Telescope

The telescope operates twenty four hours per day, through rain and cloud. About 85 per cent of all time each year is scheduled for observing. Less than five per cent of that is lost because of high winds or equipment problems. Most of the rest of the time each year is used for maintenance and testing. Around 300 researchers use the telescope each year, and more than 40 per cent of these users are from overseas.

The moving part of the dish is not fixed to the top of the tower but just sits on it. Because the large surface catches the wind like a sail, the telescope must be ‘stowed’ (pointed directly up) when the wind exceeds 35 km an hour.
Radio Astronomy

The radio waves from objects in space are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. The power received from a strong cosmic radio source by the Parkes telescope is about a hundredth of a millionth of a millionth of a watt (10-14 W). If you wanted to heat water with this power it would take about 70 000 years to heat one drop by one degree Celsius.

Galaxies contain stars, gas and dust. The gas – mostly hydrogen – is the raw material from which stars form. It emits radio waves, at a frequency of 1420 MHz. Radio astronomers spend a lot of time studying this gas, learning where it is and how it is moving.

Astronomers don’t look through the telescope. Instead, signal processing systems and computers take the radio waves the telescope collects and turns them into pictures (like photographs) of objects in space.

I was very lucky to get the loan of a car and drive to Sydney – a distance of some 1,400 kilometers (around 750 miles). Having seen some amazing night shots of the radio telescope at Parkes, I decided to go that way and spend my first night at Parkes.

Posted by Strabanephotos on 2013-09-09 07:13:12

Tagged: , The , Dish , CSIRO , Radio , Telescope , Parkes , New , South , Wales , Australia , nsw , monday , 2nd , september , 2013 , long , exposure , star , trails , celestial , pole

The classic countryside

The classic countryside

After what seemed like years of 50 hour weeks without holidays, finally a long weekend had arrived, and it was time to visit the country.

Cruising along what seemed like an endless dirt track on a motorbike, I arrived at a field which I was able to tell straight away was worthy of a photo.

I immediately hit the kill switch to cut the engine, put the motorbike stand down, and stepped off, I was mesmerised by this vast countryside beauty.

I reached over my shoulder to remove my camera backpack to discover it was covered in a thick layer of red dust from the long ride. Luckily the contents were well protected, as this would have been one of the most regrettable moments in my life had I not have been able to take a photo here.

My intended long weekend escape from my mobile phone, television, and computer didn’t seem to be much of one when I reflected on this real-life image of a field of the greenest lucern and bluest sky that man had ever seen.

I no longer felt like I was in the remote country of Australia, in fact, I felt like I was sitting in front of my Windows Desktop on a Giant computer screen, anxiously looking for my start button.

Posted by markdanielowen on 2007-01-31 02:19:44

Tagged: , markdanielowen , australia , country , countryside , lucern , hay , grass , summer , windows desktop , screenshot , background , wallpaper , farm , nsw , new , south , wales , new south wales , clouds , tree , outback , goulburn , crookwell , canon 30d , canon eos 30d , canon , eos , 30d , dslr , digital , slr , digital slr , markowen , mark owen photography , mark , owen , photography

Dynamic Calm

Dynamic Calm

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Buy here!

Desktop Background!
If you like this photo, I have created a desktop background for you to use on a range of devices, including iPhone, iPad and desktop computer. You can get it here πŸ™‚

The "For Sale" Miniseries
"Dynamic Calm" is the ninth photo in a miniseries that I recently started. Over the next few weeks, I’ll be covering all of my photographs available as prints on my website. I’ll be uploading one every weekday (except Friday), as usual, but you’ll find a lot more information on the photographs themselves – I might sneak in a few tutorials, quick tips, etc. It’ll be great for new and old photographers alike – If you have any friends who might be interested, be sure to let them know! I’ll be updating everything on my blog as well as my other social networks, so if you would prefer to follow it there, just click on one of the links above. πŸ™‚

About "Dynamic Calm"
"Dynamic Calm" was taken from the Warners Bay foreshore. Warners Bay is a suburb of the City of Lake Macquarie in New South Wales, Australia, and is located 15 kilometres from Newcastle’s central business district on the eastern side of Lake Macquarie. It was named after Jonathan Warner, who settled the area. The population of Warners Bay was 7,009 as at the 2006 census, with in excess of 615 businesses operating in the area.

Taking "Dynamic Calm"
Nikon D90 | Sigma 10-20mm
1 min 43 sec | f/13 | ISO100 | 11.5mm

Like Thursday’s upload, I took this shot after attempting a sunset at Dudley Beach (unfortunately the location didn’t quite work out). I saw that the clouds were starting to turn, so I quickly drove back to the Warners Bay Foreshore. Unfortunately most of the colour in the clouds had dissipated by the time I arrived, but nevertheless I hurriedly set up the tripod and composed this shot. Originally I went for a fairly standard shot (in terms of shutter speed), but I felt the slight ripples in the water were too distracting. So I grabbed the trusty ND filter, popped it on the end of my Sigma 10-20mm lens, and exposed for just over a minute and a half to get this shot.

Processing "Dynamic Calm"
Not much was wrong with this image. The left hand side was a little dark, so I used Adobe Camera Raw’s graduated effect filter sideways (horizontally?), to lighten up that portion of the photo. I cooled the image down slightly, but then decided to apply a warming filter in Photoshop (Photoshop’s warming filter produces a different effect compared to simply increasing the white balance temperature in Adobe Camera Raw). I had to clone out a few dust bunnies in the corners, and also one stray stick in the foreground which I was finding distracting. What are your thoughts on small cloning fixes like that? Leave a comment! πŸ™‚

Enjoy!

Posted by J.Shultz Photography on 2011-09-05 02:50:05

Tagged: , warners , bay , warners bay , foreshore , lake , river , dam , waterscape , scape , landscape , land , mountain , tree , hill , silhouette , reflection , horizon , clouds , sun , set , sunset , long , exposure , long exposure , slow , shutter , slow shutter , newcastle , macquarie , lake macquarie , warners bay foreshore , still , calm , smooth , aus , australia , new , south , wales , new south wales , nsw

Foamy Waters

Foamy Waters

[ Website ] [ Blog ] [ Flickr ] [ Facebook ] [ Twitter ] [ Tumblr ]

Buy here!

Desktop Background!
If you like this photo, I have created a desktop background for you to use on a range of devices, including iPhone, iPad and desktop computer. You can get it here πŸ™‚

The "For Sale" Miniseries
"Foamy Waters" is the twelfth photo in a miniseries that I recently started. Over the next few weeks, I’ll be covering all of my photographs available as prints on my website. I’ll be uploading one every weekday (except Friday), as usual, but you’ll find a lot more information on the photographs themselves – I might sneak in a few tutorials, quick tips, etc. It’ll be great for new and old photographers alike – If you have any friends who might be interested, be sure to let them know! I’ll be updating everything on my blog as well as my other social networks, so if you would prefer to follow it there, just click on one of the links above. πŸ™‚

About "Foamy Waters"
"Foamy Waters" was taken just south of Garie Beach, in the Royal National Park. Garie Beach has some of the best surfing waves in Sydney and is a very popular family beach destination. The Garie Surf Life Saving Club provide an essential community service in helping to keep the public safe at the beach. Garie is home to the Garie Boardriders Club. Garie Boardriders has an active membership of just over 100 member on average and has been continually running as a boardriders club since 1978. The club’s books now have over 500 members on them and a lot of older members are returning to compete in the senior and masters divisions.

Taking "Foamy Waters"
Nikon D90 | Sigma 10-20mm
1/40 sec | f/6.3 | ISO100 | 13mm

This shot is a little different to my normal seascapes, that being that I really want to capture the waves hitting the rocks with very little motion blur (though enough to show movement). Usually I go with slightly longer exposures, but with this shot I used a relatively ‘quick’ shutter speed to ‘freeze’ the water. I spent about 15 minutes in the one location – once I had composed the shot, I used a remote trigger and took about 80 photos, trying to get the incoming waves just at the right time. I liked the composition of the waves in this shot the best.

Processing "Foamy Waters"
A lot of processing time went into this shot (about 2 and a half hours). In Adobe Camera Raw I cloned out some dust spots and straightened a slightly wonky horizon (the tripod slipped a little while taking shots). I applied some global contrast, clarity, recovery and fill light boosts. I desaturated, and then started working on getting the tone just right. I wanted this image to really pop – the orginal was quite flat. So I used the graduated filter tool to boost the exposure and contrast of the pool in the foreground, then used the effect brush to highlight certain parts of the rock face and waves. The clouds required some special attention too – I used a combination of graduated filters and the effect brush to highlight certain parts of the cloud. Then in Photoshop I adjusted curves and levels, and also added more contrast just to the pool in the foreground.

Enjoy!

Posted by J.Shultz Photography on 2011-09-08 02:32:40

Tagged: , foamy , waters , water , sea , ocean , land , scape , waterscape , seascape , oceanscape , lanscape , garie beach , beach , beachscape , garie , era , era beach , woollongong , royal national park , royal , park , south , coast , coastal , south coast , sydney south , south sydney , sydney , cliff , cilhouette , wave , stop , reflection , overcast , moody , black and white , black white , b & w , b , w , black , white , pool , rough