Want To Know About Beauty? Read On

Want To Know About Beauty? Read On

Though the process may seem overwhelming at first, the first step is to start familiarizing yourself with assorted products and beauty treatments. Fortunately, this article contains a number of guidelines that should make it easier to build your own beauty regimen.

You could always fill a tiny jar with a favorite moisturizer. Containers of this size can be easily carried wherever you go. As soon as your skin becomes dry or flaky, apply a small amount of moisturizer to your face.

White eyeshadow in the midst of your lip can present you with a gorgeous appearance. The sunshine reflecting off the middle of your upper lip creates the illusion of any full upper lip.

This may cause you a lot of problems as your follicles are open during that time. If you do something such as this, you will probably have irritation. This goes for making use of scented skin products as well. The products connect with open follicles in a fashion that causes extreme irritation.

If you suffer from red eyes, all the eyeshadow and liner on earth is not really going to help you look better. Always carry eye drops together with you. Make use of emergency eye drops to resolve any irritation issues, from sun exposure to allergies.

If your eyes appear red, you will not get the full effect from eye makeup. To aid with red eyes, keep eye drops handy wherever you happen to be. Eye drops can provide instant relief when they are tired from a lot of computer time or being out in the sun.

Shimmer should simply be used sparingly. This will develop a nice glowing effect. Use highlighter on the higher, more defining parts of your face. As an example, you might highlight brows, nose and cheekbones. Follow with a loose dusting of face powder.

You ought to see given that although beauty systems vary, each of them share certain common roots. They are doing vary inside their techniques and types of products. Just conduct some research to learn which variation is the greatest fit for you and the resources. fragranceamour.com/

Posted by Abe Knouse on 2013-10-03 19:59:29

Tagged: , fragrance , for , love , perfume , sexy

Mariette Hartley, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Mariette Hartley, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2017-10-08 17:49:46

Tagged: , Mariette Hartley , Star Trek , television , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , actress , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , niña bonita , nostalgic , nostalgia , hübsches Mädchen , hübsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , celebrity , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , American , USA , añejo , época , clásico , hair , hair style , fashion , Hollywood , atriz , ephemeral , woman , girl , schön , old , lady , jahrgang , alt , oll

Mariette Hartley, Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Mariette Hartley, Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2017-10-08 17:49:40

Tagged: , Leonard Nimoy , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll , Mariette Hartley , actress , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , niña bonita , hübsches Mädchen , hübsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , hair , hair style , atriz , woman , girl , schön , lady

Leonard Nimoy, Mariette Hartley, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Leonard Nimoy, Mariette Hartley, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2017-10-08 17:49:46

Tagged: , Mariette Hartley , Leonard Nimoy , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll , actress , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , niña bonita , hübsches Mädchen , hübsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , hair , hair style , atriz , woman , girl , schön , lady

Mariette Hartley, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Mariette Hartley, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2017-10-08 17:49:44

Tagged: , Mariette Hartley , Star Trek , television , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , actress , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , niña bonita , nostalgic , nostalgia , hübsches Mädchen , hübsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , celebrity , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , American , USA , añejo , época , clásico , hair , hair style , fashion , Hollywood , atriz , ephemeral , woman , girl , schön , old , lady , jahrgang , alt , oll

Mariette Hartley, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Mariette Hartley, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2017-10-08 17:49:39

Tagged: , Mariette Hartley , Star Trek , television , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , actress , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , niña bonita , nostalgic , nostalgia , hübsches Mädchen , hübsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , celebrity , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , American , USA , añejo , época , clásico , hair , hair style , fashion , Hollywood , atriz , ephemeral , woman , girl , schön , old , lady , jahrgang , alt , oll

Leonard Nimoy, Mariette Hartley, DeForest Kelley, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Leonard Nimoy, Mariette Hartley, DeForest Kelley, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2017-10-08 17:49:42

Tagged: , Leonard Nimoy , DeForest Kelley , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll , Mariette Hartley , actress , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , niña bonita , hübsches Mädchen , hübsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , hair , hair style , atriz , woman , girl , schön , lady

Mariette Hartley, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Mariette Hartley, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2017-10-08 17:49:46

Tagged: , Leonard Nimoy , DeForest Kelley , Mariette Hartley , Star Trek , television , actor , actress , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , hat , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , niña bonita , hübsches Mädchen , hübsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , hair , hair style , atriz , woman , girl , schön , lady

Mariette Hartley, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Mariette Hartley, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

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Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2017-10-08 17:49:42

Tagged: , Mariette Hartley , Star Trek , television , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , actress , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , niña bonita , nostalgic , nostalgia , hübsches Mädchen , hübsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , celebrity , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , American , USA , añejo , época , clásico , hair , hair style , fashion , Hollywood , atriz , ephemeral , woman , girl , schön , old , lady , jahrgang , alt , oll

Mariette Hartley, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Mariette Hartley, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2017-10-08 17:49:40

Tagged: , Mariette Hartley , Star Trek , television , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , actress , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , niña bonita , nostalgic , nostalgia , hübsches Mädchen , hübsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , celebrity , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , American , USA , añejo , época , clásico , hair , hair style , fashion , Hollywood , atriz , ephemeral , woman , girl , schön , old , lady , jahrgang , alt , oll