sunburned, blistered and tired of working on this.

sunburned, blistered and tired of working on this.

Having to clean out the storage unit in Oklahoma where many things such as furniture, appliances, an electronics have been gathering dust for about three years now. Getting rid of the stuff no longer wanted and repacking the stuff to keep and making sure it’s still in good condition. This probably isn’t even 1/4 of the total stuff. Have already packed up another storage unit full of things that are going to be kept. If one more spec of dust flies in my face or another horde of spiders comes racing towards me, I may just end up abandoning the site. lol.

One more day of this and the kid is going to turn on me.

—————————–

Status updates on items I am trying to sell off;

People currently Interested in Sold Items
Big Green Couch and Love seat: Sold
Treadmill: Sold
Washer and Dryer: Sold
Dining Room Table and Chairs for 6: Sold
Large Striped Couch with Ottoman and Hideaway Bed: Sold
Magna Outreach Bicycle: Sold

Still Want to See Go Bye:
Very Large HDTV Television:
Large HDTV Ready Television
Surround Sound System
Working Apple Titanium Laptop, good condition, MAC OSX loaded.
Two Sets of TULA Scuba Gear (snorkle, mask, fins, boots, travel bag)
SCSI Scanner and Old Mac Software: Take it for free, please.
SCSI 8x Record Speed DVD Burner: Take it free, please.
DVD Player
Various backpacks and bags for computer gear.
4 sets of not so awesome looking fake trees.

2 (so far) VCR Tape Recorders.
Several Television Sets of Various Sizes.
Several sizes of Computer Monitors. (not flat screen)
Hewlett Packard PC (not currently working)
21" Philips Computer Monitor, excellent Condition

Other Items
Volumes and Volumes of PhotoDisk Stock Books:Trashed.
Herman Miller Aeron Chair: Still badass and still mine. 🙂
Old boxes of comic books wrapped and stored in containers: Prob worth something now.
Golf Clubs: recovered and taking back to NYC.
All photo albums ensuring I did have a past: Found.

* list to be updated as items are sold and new items found in back of original storage shed and moved out to new one.

Posted by absolutwade on 2007-09-02 05:52:23

Tagged: , absolutwade , September , 2007 , iphone , storage , Oklahoma City , Oklahoma , must sell

Over My Head

Over My Head

A large spider may be living behind the picture frame over my computer desk. Doubtful that I will be dusting or cleaning this frame for a while . . .

Eastern Parson Spider – IDed by Dougeee

Posted by mcnod on 2014-10-13 08:39:49

Tagged: , mcnod , spider , ferndale , september , 2014 , eastern parson , Herpyllus ecclesiasticus , eastern parson spider

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

‘The Dish’ is a well known Australian movie about how this radio telescope at Parkes, NSW, played a major role covering the moon landing in 1969.

I had seen both the movie and some amazing images taken by Simon, a member of Barossa Photography Club so I thought I would also give it a go. Each of these exposures took about 30 minutes – I didn’t get there until nearly 10pm so these (and some which didn’t work out) meant it was getting very late when I finished!

From: www.csiro.au/Portals/Education/Programs/Parkes-Radio-Tele…

The Telescope

CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope is a 64-m diameter parabolic dish used for radio astronomy. It is located about 20 km north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), and about 380 km west of Sydney.

It is operated by CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), a business unit of CSIRO. CASS also operates the Australia Telescope Compact Array near Narrabri, NSW, and the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and is developing the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope in Western Australia.

The telescope was built in 1961, but only its basic structure has remained unchanged. The surface, control system, focus cabin, receivers, computers and cabling have all been upgraded – some parts many times – to keep the telescope current.

The telescope is now ten thousand times more sensitive than when commissioned in 1961.
Using the Telescope

The telescope operates twenty four hours per day, through rain and cloud. About 85 per cent of all time each year is scheduled for observing. Less than five per cent of that is lost because of high winds or equipment problems. Most of the rest of the time each year is used for maintenance and testing. Around 300 researchers use the telescope each year, and more than 40 per cent of these users are from overseas.

The moving part of the dish is not fixed to the top of the tower but just sits on it. Because the large surface catches the wind like a sail, the telescope must be ‘stowed’ (pointed directly up) when the wind exceeds 35 km an hour.
Radio Astronomy

The radio waves from objects in space are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. The power received from a strong cosmic radio source by the Parkes telescope is about a hundredth of a millionth of a millionth of a watt (10-14 W). If you wanted to heat water with this power it would take about 70 000 years to heat one drop by one degree Celsius.

Galaxies contain stars, gas and dust. The gas – mostly hydrogen – is the raw material from which stars form. It emits radio waves, at a frequency of 1420 MHz. Radio astronomers spend a lot of time studying this gas, learning where it is and how it is moving.

Astronomers don’t look through the telescope. Instead, signal processing systems and computers take the radio waves the telescope collects and turns them into pictures (like photographs) of objects in space.

I was very lucky to get the loan of a car and drive to Sydney – a distance of some 1,400 kilometers (around 750 miles). Having seen some amazing night shots of the radio telescope at Parkes, I decided to go that way and spend my first night at Parkes.

Posted by Strabanephotos on 2013-09-09 07:12:54

Tagged: , The , Dish , CSIRO , Radio , Telescope , Parkes , New , South , Wales , Australia , nsw , monday , 2nd , september , 2013 , long , exposure , star , trails , celestial , pole

Stars circling around the Celestial South Pole, The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

Stars circling around the Celestial South Pole, The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

‘The Dish’ is a well known Australian movie about how this radio telescope at Parkes, NSW, played a major role covering the moon landing in 1969.

I had seen both the movie and some amazing images taken by Simon, a member of Barossa Photography Club so I thought I would also give it a go. Each of these exposures took about 30 minutes – I didn’t get there until nearly 10pm so these (and some which didn’t work out) meant it was getting very late when I finished!

From: www.csiro.au/Portals/Education/Programs/Parkes-Radio-Tele…

The Telescope

CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope is a 64-m diameter parabolic dish used for radio astronomy. It is located about 20 km north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), and about 380 km west of Sydney.

It is operated by CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), a business unit of CSIRO. CASS also operates the Australia Telescope Compact Array near Narrabri, NSW, and the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and is developing the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope in Western Australia.

The telescope was built in 1961, but only its basic structure has remained unchanged. The surface, control system, focus cabin, receivers, computers and cabling have all been upgraded – some parts many times – to keep the telescope current.

The telescope is now ten thousand times more sensitive than when commissioned in 1961.
Using the Telescope

The telescope operates twenty four hours per day, through rain and cloud. About 85 per cent of all time each year is scheduled for observing. Less than five per cent of that is lost because of high winds or equipment problems. Most of the rest of the time each year is used for maintenance and testing. Around 300 researchers use the telescope each year, and more than 40 per cent of these users are from overseas.

The moving part of the dish is not fixed to the top of the tower but just sits on it. Because the large surface catches the wind like a sail, the telescope must be ‘stowed’ (pointed directly up) when the wind exceeds 35 km an hour.
Radio Astronomy

The radio waves from objects in space are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. The power received from a strong cosmic radio source by the Parkes telescope is about a hundredth of a millionth of a millionth of a watt (10-14 W). If you wanted to heat water with this power it would take about 70 000 years to heat one drop by one degree Celsius.

Galaxies contain stars, gas and dust. The gas – mostly hydrogen – is the raw material from which stars form. It emits radio waves, at a frequency of 1420 MHz. Radio astronomers spend a lot of time studying this gas, learning where it is and how it is moving.

Astronomers don’t look through the telescope. Instead, signal processing systems and computers take the radio waves the telescope collects and turns them into pictures (like photographs) of objects in space.

I was very lucky to get the loan of a car and drive to Sydney – a distance of some 1,400 kilometers (around 750 miles). Having seen some amazing night shots of the radio telescope at Parkes, I decided to go that way and spend my first night at Parkes.

Posted by Strabanephotos on 2013-09-09 07:13:00

Tagged: , The , Dish , CSIRO , Radio , Telescope , Parkes , New , South , Wales , Australia , nsw , monday , 2nd , september , 2013 , long , exposure , star , trails , celestial , pole

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

The dish was continually moving – usually by small amounts, presumably as the stars moved – but it the middle of a 30 minute exposure it made a huge movement. So the dish is turning round, you can see the stars moving round, the earth is spinning – made me feel quite dizzy 🙂

‘The Dish’ is a well known Australian movie about how this radio telescope at Parkes, NSW, played a major role covering the moon landing in 1969.

I had seen both the movie and some amazing images taken by Simon, a member of Barossa Photography Club so I thought I would also give it a go. Each of these exposures took about 30 minutes – I didn’t get there until nearly 10pm so these (and some which didn’t work out) meant it was getting very late when I finished!

From: www.csiro.au/Portals/Education/Programs/Parkes-Radio-Tele…

The Telescope

CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope is a 64-m diameter parabolic dish used for radio astronomy. It is located about 20 km north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), and about 380 km west of Sydney.

It is operated by CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), a business unit of CSIRO. CASS also operates the Australia Telescope Compact Array near Narrabri, NSW, and the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and is developing the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope in Western Australia.

The telescope was built in 1961, but only its basic structure has remained unchanged. The surface, control system, focus cabin, receivers, computers and cabling have all been upgraded – some parts many times – to keep the telescope current.

The telescope is now ten thousand times more sensitive than when commissioned in 1961.
Using the Telescope

The telescope operates twenty four hours per day, through rain and cloud. About 85 per cent of all time each year is scheduled for observing. Less than five per cent of that is lost because of high winds or equipment problems. Most of the rest of the time each year is used for maintenance and testing. Around 300 researchers use the telescope each year, and more than 40 per cent of these users are from overseas.

The moving part of the dish is not fixed to the top of the tower but just sits on it. Because the large surface catches the wind like a sail, the telescope must be ‘stowed’ (pointed directly up) when the wind exceeds 35 km an hour.
Radio Astronomy

The radio waves from objects in space are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. The power received from a strong cosmic radio source by the Parkes telescope is about a hundredth of a millionth of a millionth of a watt (10-14 W). If you wanted to heat water with this power it would take about 70 000 years to heat one drop by one degree Celsius.

Galaxies contain stars, gas and dust. The gas – mostly hydrogen – is the raw material from which stars form. It emits radio waves, at a frequency of 1420 MHz. Radio astronomers spend a lot of time studying this gas, learning where it is and how it is moving.

Astronomers don’t look through the telescope. Instead, signal processing systems and computers take the radio waves the telescope collects and turns them into pictures (like photographs) of objects in space.

I was very lucky to get the loan of a car and drive to Sydney – a distance of some 1,400 kilometers (around 750 miles). Having seen some amazing night shots of the radio telescope at Parkes, I decided to go that way and spend my first night at Parkes.

Posted by Strabanephotos on 2013-09-09 07:13:06

Tagged: , The , Dish , CSIRO , Radio , Telescope , Parkes , New , South , Wales , Australia , nsw , monday , 2nd , september , 2013 , long , exposure , star , trails , celestial , pole

I so need a fairy godmother

I so need a fairy godmother

continue to be busy, one last wedding on Friday, then things start to chill. Took some time out to make my son’s BFF a fairy skirt and pixie dust necklace for her bday… didn’t really have time but it was fun to do something creative that didn’t involve the computer ;P

Posted by Cosi! on 2011-09-08 04:09:51

Tagged: , tulle strips on elastic waist band, ribbon, butterfly decorating pick , fairy wear , trees , owp , story , september

Stuff has Arrived.

Stuff has Arrived.

And not near enough place to put it all.

Posted by absolutwade on 2004-11-08 19:28:37

Tagged: , absolutwade , 2004 , New York , September , © Beau Wade , Nikon Coolpix 5700 , NYC , Manhattan , Battery Park City , Apartment , Moving , Unpacking , Windows

turpanzhan

turpanzhan

On 9/11 I was traveling in Xingjiang Province in China, waiting for the night train from Turpan Zhan to Dunhuang. By chance, there was an Internet cafe next to the train station, so I went in and found a computer between some Chinese soldiers and a young Uyghur man chatting online with friends. Most Western news organizations were blocked in China, but Excite.com, where I had an email account, somehow got past the censors. When the page loaded, I saw the news that the WTC had been hit by a plane.

It just so happened that my girlfriend in Japan (now my wife) was online and so she relayed to me the news she was watching on her television. Occasionally, I would look around, only to find that the Chinese world was still unaware of what was happening on the other side of the planet.

When it came time to board my train, I was left in the dark. How many more planes were out there? Who was doing it? What would the world look like when I had a chance to check the Internet the next day. Looking around at the Chinese web surfers, I knew that nobody within hundreds of miles had heard the news. In fact, it would be another day before the Muslim inhabitants of Western China were allowed to hear about the attacks. And so, I had only my dark thoughts on that long, lonely trip.

Posted by zanzo on 2007-01-26 09:09:25

Tagged: , 911 , 2001 , 2006 , 91101 , 200605 , 9112001 , 20060516 , aerial , aftermath , america , attack , backintheday , blackandwhite , broadway , brooklyn , building , cbs , center , charges , chelsea , cleanup , cloud , clouds , controlled , cuba2006 , cutter , destruction , dust , firefighter , flight175 , foxnews , free , gasmask , geolat40701602 , geolat4070285 , geolon7399463 , geolon74049450 , geotagged , gothamist , greenwichvillage , groundzero , havana , investigation , jr , liberty , malencon , manhattan , mask , memorial , new , newyork , newyorkcity , notreal , ny , nyc , nyfd , park , pentagon , people , photos , preplaced , recovery , recruitment , redcross , retro , screenshot , sept11 , sept112001 , september , september11 , september112001 , september11th , skyline , slides , smoke , terror , terrorism , theworldtradecenter , top20history , towers , trade , travel , tributeinlight , tributes , twin , twintowers , unionsquare , unitedstates , us , usa , video , washingtonsquarepark , world , worldtradecenter , worldtradecentre , wtc , wtc7 , wtcmemorials , york , google earth , geotagging , folksonomy , folksonomies , travel log , tagging , mashup , tagcloud

Stars circling around the Celestial South Pole, The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

Stars circling around the Celestial South Pole, The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

‘The Dish’ is a well known Australian movie about how this radio telescope at Parkes, NSW, played a major role covering the moon landing in 1969.

I had seen both the movie and some amazing images taken by Simon, a member of Barossa Photography Club so I thought I would also give it a go. Each of these exposures took about 30 minutes – I didn’t get there until nearly 10pm so these (and some which didn’t work out) meant it was getting very late when I finished!

From: www.csiro.au/Portals/Education/Programs/Parkes-Radio-Tele…

The Telescope

CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope is a 64-m diameter parabolic dish used for radio astronomy. It is located about 20 km north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), and about 380 km west of Sydney.

It is operated by CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), a business unit of CSIRO. CASS also operates the Australia Telescope Compact Array near Narrabri, NSW, and the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and is developing the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope in Western Australia.

The telescope was built in 1961, but only its basic structure has remained unchanged. The surface, control system, focus cabin, receivers, computers and cabling have all been upgraded – some parts many times – to keep the telescope current.

The telescope is now ten thousand times more sensitive than when commissioned in 1961.
Using the Telescope

The telescope operates twenty four hours per day, through rain and cloud. About 85 per cent of all time each year is scheduled for observing. Less than five per cent of that is lost because of high winds or equipment problems. Most of the rest of the time each year is used for maintenance and testing. Around 300 researchers use the telescope each year, and more than 40 per cent of these users are from overseas.

The moving part of the dish is not fixed to the top of the tower but just sits on it. Because the large surface catches the wind like a sail, the telescope must be ‘stowed’ (pointed directly up) when the wind exceeds 35 km an hour.
Radio Astronomy

The radio waves from objects in space are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. The power received from a strong cosmic radio source by the Parkes telescope is about a hundredth of a millionth of a millionth of a watt (10-14 W). If you wanted to heat water with this power it would take about 70 000 years to heat one drop by one degree Celsius.

Galaxies contain stars, gas and dust. The gas – mostly hydrogen – is the raw material from which stars form. It emits radio waves, at a frequency of 1420 MHz. Radio astronomers spend a lot of time studying this gas, learning where it is and how it is moving.

Astronomers don’t look through the telescope. Instead, signal processing systems and computers take the radio waves the telescope collects and turns them into pictures (like photographs) of objects in space.

I was very lucky to get the loan of a car and drive to Sydney – a distance of some 1,400 kilometers (around 750 miles). Having seen some amazing night shots of the radio telescope at Parkes, I decided to go that way and spend my first night at Parkes.

Posted by Strabanephotos on 2013-09-09 07:13:12

Tagged: , The , Dish , CSIRO , Radio , Telescope , Parkes , New , South , Wales , Australia , nsw , monday , 2nd , september , 2013 , long , exposure , star , trails , celestial , pole

Strobed iMac

Strobed iMac

Testing the new Nikon SB-28 I picked up last night. I know…my desk is a bit dusty back there and you can see the flash…just testing it out though…

For the strobist. Nikon SB-28 1/32 behind computer triggered with Gadget Infinity V2.

Posted by noeltykay on 2007-09-19 20:40:06

Tagged: , strobist , Apple , iMac , Macintosh , Intel iMac , Canon 30D , Canon EF 28-135 IS , Nikon Speedlight SB-28 , September , 2007