IMG_5445

IMG_5445

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:33:14

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5417

IMG_5417

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:32:59

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5428

IMG_5428

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:33:04

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5413

IMG_5413

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:32:57

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5426

IMG_5426

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:33:03

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5414

IMG_5414

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:32:57

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5412

IMG_5412

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:32:57

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5416

IMG_5416

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

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Jupiter

Jupiter

We didn’t end up looking through the main telescopes until the very end of the night, after the wonderful science lecture on "active galaxies" and black holes. (Some parts were difficult to follow, but the lecturer, David Rosario, was fairly good at explaining most of it.) The best part was a video of a star getting sling-shot around the center of a galaxy with nothing visibly present there, presumably indicating a black hole.

I enjoyed the ambience of the 36" dome more than the image I saw through it. It was neat seeing the stars, but without having too much knowledge, it may has well have been a cloud of dust.

The 40" telescope is in a very cramped room, so the ambience wasn’t the most appealing part of it. In this case, the telescope was pointed at Jupiter–something I could relate to at least. It was a bit blurry, and because of atmospheric disturbance a little shaky.

In both rooms, I tried taking some long exposures. None of them really turned out, but it was funny how many of the astronomers said "This is a stupid question, but that doesn’t have a flash, right?" (Or, in the 40", "If that has a flash, I’m going to…") When viewing through the telescopes, the rooms are kept dark with only red light allowed. A flash would have blinded everyone. (If I didn’t have the 5D, which doesn’t have a built-in flash, I probably would not have taken any pictures, worrying I’d somehow screw up turning the flash off.)

At the end, one of the astronomers asked if I wanted to take a picture through the telescope. I hadn’t even thought about it, but why not? It’s just a really powerful telephoto, right? They suggested some settings (which I used), and I just held the lens up to the eyepiece (which was specially installed for viewings like on this night; normally they use a computer), and snapped.

The image isn’t too clear, but it’s still pretty cool capturing the memory of looking through the scope.

I actually captured one of the moons, but Jupiter was overexposed. To bring out Jupiter more, I had to sacrifice the moon.

I think the history lecture helped me appreciate viewing Jupiter more. One of the moons (Amalthea) was discovered at the Lick Observatory, the first moon discovered since Galileo (though that was through the 36").

Posted by mrjoro on 2007-06-26 15:49:20

Tagged: , mthamilton , lickobservatory , santaclaracounty , diablomountains , summervisitorsprogram , observatory , jupiter , telescope , throughthetelescope , 40inchreflector , planet , starred , San Jose , California , United States of America

A Grazing Encounter Between Two Spiral Galaxies (NGC 2207 and IC2163)

A Grazing Encounter Between Two Spiral Galaxies (NGC 2207 and IC2163)

In the direction of the constellation Canis Major, two spiral galaxies pass by each other like majestic ships in the night. The near-collision has been caught in images taken by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope and its Wide Field Planetary Camera 2.

The larger and more massive galaxy is cataloged as NGC 2207 (on the left in the Hubble Heritage image), and the smaller one on the right is IC 2163. Strong tidal forces from NGC 2207 have distorted the shape of IC 2163, flinging out stars and gas into long streamers stretching out a hundred thousand light-years toward the right-hand edge of the image.

Computer simulations, carried out by a team led by Bruce and Debra Elmegreen, demonstrate the leisurely timescale over which galactic collisions occur. In addition to the Hubble images, measurements made with the National Science Foundation’s Very Large Array Radio Telescope in New Mexico reveal the motions of the galaxies and aid the reconstruction of the collision.

The calculations indicate that IC 2163 is swinging past NGC 2207 in a counterclockwise direction, having made its closest approach 40 million years ago. However, IC 2163 does not have sufficient energy to escape from the gravitational pull of NGC 2207, and is destined to be pulled back and swing past the larger galaxy again in the future.

The high resolution of the Hubble telescope image reveals dust lanes in the spiral arms of NGC 2207, clearly silhouetted against IC 2163, which is in the background. Hubble also reveals a series of parallel dust filaments extending like fine brush strokes along the tidally stretched material on the right-hand side. The large concentrations of gas and dust in both galaxies may well erupt into regions of active star formation in the near future.

Trapped in their mutual orbit around each other, these two galaxies will continue to distort and disrupt each other. Eventually, billions of years from now, they will merge into a single, more massive galaxy. It is believed that many present-day galaxies, including the Milky Way, were assembled from a similar process of coalescence of smaller galaxies occurring over billions of years.

This image was created from 3 separate pointings of Hubble. The Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 data sets were obtained by Debra Meloy Elmegreen (Vassar College), Bruce G. Elmegreen (IBM Research Division), Michele Kaufman (Ohio State U.), Elias Brinks (Universidad de Guanajuato, Mexico), Curt Struck (Iowa State University), Magnus Thomasson (Onsala Space Obs., Sweden), Maria Sundin (Goteborg University, Sweden), and Mario Klaric (Columbia, South Carolina).

hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/1999/41/image/a/

Posted by zen724 on 2007-08-27 17:52:07

Tagged: , astronomy , galaxy , google , nebula , nebulae , night , observatory , planet , sky , star , stars , universe , Hubble