Photo added to “All Photos”

Photo added to

purple nebula and cosmic dust in star field

Posted by jonathansialreug on 2018-05-13 14:38:09

Tagged: , IFTTT , iOS , Photos , Backdrop , Astronomy , Textured , Big Bang , Bunch , Heaven , Abstract , Constellation , Milky Way , Planetarium , Dust , Exploding , Computer Graphic , Backgrounds , Infinity , Origins , Futuristic , Exploration , Mystery , Order , Star Shape , Dark , Multi Colored , Purple , Blue , Black Color , Deep , Science , Nature , Night , Light – Natural Phenomenon , Natural Gas , Field , Galaxy , Star – Space , Nebula , Planet – Space , Space , Cloud – Sky , Sun , Sky , Astronomy Telescope , Plasma , Astrology

Fairy dust

Fairy dust

I am in the middle of sorting out photos/folders on my computer.

It is so fun to look back at images i have taken from years ago!
I have wandered across some images which i really like, and i wonder why i haven’t uploaded them before!
This beauty is from 2011!!!

Posted by www.charlottechapmanphotography.co.uk on 2017-03-18 23:37:31

Tagged: , flower , macro , fairydust , pinkflower , garden , nature

Don’t Fall For These 24 Myths About Facebook Ads [Free Guide] http://bit.ly/2q0EA6L

Don’t Fall For These 24 Myths About Facebook Ads [Free Guide] http://bit.ly/2q0EA6L

bit.ly/2rvuInv

Posted by brandready on 2017-05-18 16:55:18

Tagged: , Inbound , Marketing , WordPress , Astronomy , Telescope , Cloudscape , Glowing , Star Chart , Moon Surface , Illustration , Andromeda Galaxy , Abstract , Constellation , Dust , Orbiting , Exploding , Computer Graphic , Backgrounds , Spiral , Infinity , Imagination , Fantasy , Star Shape , Dark , Purple , Blue , Black Color , Crowded , Deep , Science , Nature , Night , Light – Natural Phenomenon , Galaxy , Star – Space , Nebula , Earth , Planet – Space , Moon , Space , Cloud – Sky , Sun , Sky , Street , Astronomy Telescope , milky , outer , Plasma , Gas , Wallpaper Pattern , Astrology , Planetary Moon

M45- The Pleiades Cluster

M45- The Pleiades Cluster

The Pleiades, also known as M45, the Seven Sisters or Subaru (Japan), is an open star cluster containing middle-aged stars located in the constellation of Taurus. It is among the nearest star clusters to Earth and is the cluster most obvious to the naked eye in the night sky.

The cluster is dominated by hot blue and extremely luminous stars that have formed within the last 100 million years. Dust that forms a faint reflection nebulosity around the brightest stars was thought at first to be left over from the formation of the cluster is now known to be an unrelated dust cloud in the interstellar medium, through which the stars are currently passing. Computer simulations have shown that the Pleiades was probably formed from a compact configuration that resembled the Orion Nebula. Astronomers estimate that the cluster will survive for about another 250 million years, after which it will disperse due to gravitational interactions with its galactic neighborhood.

[Info from Wikipedia]

Nikon D7000
Explore Scientific ED80
Celestron AVX Mount
9 x 120 second exposures @ ISO 1600

Shot from the North Frontenac Township Dark Sky Preseve near Plevna, Ontario

Posted by Dark Arts Astrophotography on 2016-08-28 16:26:41

Tagged: , astrophotography , astronomy , space , stars , Sky , star , Cluster , Pleiades , Subaru , night , Nebula , nature , natur

Milky Way

Milky Way

The Milky Way is the galaxy that contains our Solar System. The Milky Way is a barred spiral galaxy some 100,000–120,000 light-years in diameter, which contains 100–400 billion stars. It may contain at least as many planets as well. The Solar System is located within the disk, about 27,000 light-years away from the Galactic Center, on the inner edge of one of the spiral-shaped concentrations of gas and dust called the Orion Arm. The stars in the inner ≈10,000 light-years form a bulge and one or more bars that radiate from the bulge. The very center is marked by an intense radio source named, Sagittarius A*, which is likely to be a supermassive black hole. Stars and gases at a wide range of distances from the Galactic center orbit at approximately 220 kilometers per second. The constant rotation speed contradicts the laws of Keplerian dynamics and suggests that much of the mass of the Milky Way does not emit or absorb electromagnetic radiation. This mass has been given the name “dark matter”. The rotational period is about 240 million years at the position of the Sun. The Galaxy as a whole is moving at a velocity of approximately 600 km per second with respect to extragalactic frames of reference. The oldest known star in the Galaxy is at least 13.6 billion years old and thus must have formed shortly after the Big Bang. Surrounded by several smaller satellite galaxies, the Milky Way is part of the Local Group of galaxies, which forms a subcomponent of the Virgo Supercluster.

Posted by pcbackup154 on 2014-06-17 16:27:25

Tagged: , abstract , airglow , argentina , astrophotography , canon , computer , deepsky , dream , galaxy , high , landscape , light , map , meade , mendoza , milkyway , music , nature , night , nightglow , nightphotography , nikon , photoshop , planet , process , stacker , stars , sun , time , way

Eastern Sierra Sunrise Timelapse

Eastern Sierra Sunrise Timelapse

I have a lot of timelapse sequences that I haven’t gotten around to processing yet, but here’s one from sunrise this morning!

Timelapse videos are easy to create on your DSLR. There are many software packages which will facilitate the process, some better than others, but I’ll describe the simple and relatively low cost workflow that I currently use. You’ll need software on your PC which can convert a sequence of JPEG files to timelapse video. I use VirtualDub (free download) to create an AVI format video, then I use MPEG Streamclip (free download) to convert the huge .AVI file to a much smaller (albeit lower quality) MPEG-4 for online use. Here’s the process from shooting to finished video:

Clean your camera sensor. It is hard enough to remove dust from one image… picture having to do that 300 times. Even copying dust removal from one image to the others, the data changes over time (from shot to shot), so it really won’t work well across the whole sequence. It’s far, far better to remove the dust up front. Clean your camera sensor!.

Put your camera on a sturdy tripod. Install a fully charged battery and a blank, freshly-formatted memory card which can handle several hundred images.

Compose your image expecting to lose some of the vertical information if you’ll convert the sequence to HD video with a narrow HD shape (16:9 aspect ratio).

Manually focus your camera and switch off automatic focus. If you forget to do this, your camera will insert delays in the sequence as it hunts for focus, making the playback jerky at best. Worst case, your camera may lose focus and you’ll end up with a whole lot of blurry images.

Make some test shots to determine best exposure. If practical, set exposure manually so it won’t change from shot to shot and cause flashing (flicker) as different exposures come up during playback. If the light will change a lot during shooting (sunrise and sunset), you can use automatic exposure, but then the exposure during the video is artificially stagnant, and you’ll need to to "deflicker" the timelapse to reduce flashing from frame to frame when producing the video. You will learn some very interesting and important things about your DLSR in this process! When your DSLR changes the exposure up or down 1/3 stop from shot to shot, simply "fixing" the exposure during editing will not result in similar-looking images from shot to shot! Even adjacent images taken a fraction of a second apart may have different white balance, and a slight exposure change also affects contrast, color saturation, and so on. Once you’ve gone through the process a few times your whole approach will change and you’ll try to maximize quality and consistency in-camera, not during editing.

Shoot several hundred images in a row. You can make the timing from frame to frame consistent using an Intervalometer Trigger (external timer), or you can simply hit the shutter release over and over (perhaps use the display of the prior image on the camera rear LCD as your cue to trigger the next shot and keep them at a fairly consistent rate). Remember that your finished product will be 30 frames per second, so you’ll need 300 images for each 10 seconds of video. I recommend shooting in RAW format so you can adjust the exposures during editing, especially if you shoot at sunrise or sunset where the light will change over the course of your timelapse.

Read your camera’s files into your editing software and crop them to the 16:9 aspect ratio of HD video. Remember that you have far more resolution in your DSLR than you need for HD video, so you can perform a "digital zoom" and focus on only a portion of your original camera image. Software strong in batch editing such as Adobe Lightroom (free trial available) will enable you to apply a consistent crop, exposure adjustments and even spot removal across the entire sequence of images. You’ll also want to impose one consistent white balance across the entire sequence. Some video processing software (such as Adobe Premiere I believe) will even let you specify a starting crop and a different finishing crop, then calculate a zoom and pan across your sequence of images.

Save your files in sRGB JPEG format at 1280 x 720 resolution for video to be used on sites like YouTube or Flickr that only allow smaller 720p HD format video, or save them at 1920 x 1080 resolution for 1080p video to be uploaded to sites such as Vimeo. If you’ll use the VirtualDub software, it will want you to point to the first image in the sequence then look for a sequential numbered file, so if you used automatic exposure bracketing while shooting you may be editing and saving every third file, but you can rename them sequentially so VirtualDub can order them properly.

Read the sequence into VirtualDub. It’s important to notice when trying to import them that in the dialog box where you’re looking for the first file to select, the file format has a drop-down menu which enables you to specify that it should look for an image sequence in JPG format.

Add filters as desired, in the order that you want them to apply. For example, Virtualdub can crop and resize larger JPEGs, perform sharpening at the new lower resolution, and you can search for and install a third party "MSU deflicker" filter to improve image consistency from frame to frame across the whole video. Check your frame rate and for maximum quality (but shorter result) change the default 10 frames per second to 30.

Save the video in AVI format. That’s a very high quality format, so it may save a file of a gigabyte or more! Enjoy this high quality file on your computer (or read it into video editing software to burn it to Blue-Ray DVD).

To create smaller files for online sharing, read your .AVI file into MPEG Streamclip. Save to MPEG-4, playing with quality vs. file size tradeoffs until the results are what you want.

Upload your results to your favorite video sharing site. That’s it! It takes a little more planning to pull off well and a little more time to produce the finished result, but you can produce some amazing videos.

For more information on shooting timelapse sequences, I recommend browsing the discussion forums over on www.Timescapes.org.

A slightly expanded version of these instructions, with links to the software downloads, may be found on my blog, MyPhotoGuides.com.

Posted by Jeffrey Sullivan on 2010-11-19 06:45:12

Tagged: , sunset , timelapse , HD , 720P , video , Monitor , Pass , clouds , Jeff , Sullivan , landscape , nature , California , USA , photo , Copyright , November , 2010 , Eastern , Sierra , Canon , EOS , 5D mark II

Wheeler Glacier and Cirque Headwall

Wheeler Glacier and Cirque Headwall

Wheeler Glacier and Cirque Headwall. Great Basin National Park, Nevada. September 26, 2017. © Copyright 2017 G Dan Mitchell – all rights reserved.

Wheeler Glacier and the cirque headwall below Wheeler Peak, Great Basin National Park

On my recent first-time visit to Nevada’s Great Basin National Park I experienced the challenges and rewards of photographing a brand new (to me!) location. As I have previously noted, I usually avoid doing too much research about a new destination ahead of time, at least beyond what is necessary to successfully get there and back and locate places to stay and eat, along with the most basic known features of the place. (For anyone who hasn’t heard the message already, I’m trying to retain the potential for discovery in new places and to make it more likely that I will form my own orientation to them.) So, what I actually knew about this park in advance of my visit was somewhat limited: it is formed around the Snake Mountains, it is famous for its caves, Wheeler Peak is the second highest point in Nevada, there might be fall color at this time of year, that much of the park is not easily accessible… and there is a glacier!

From this and a few of my other photographs of the high areas of the park you might get the impression that it is largely and alpine place. It isn’t. In fact, the spots that do have that feeling are a small portion of the park and at least partially notable for being exceptions. Yet, once you arrive at such places they become your entire world. (Well, almost your entire world, since views of the surrounding "basin" terrain are rarely far away.) This glacial cirque cuts into the highest ridge, separating the two tallest summits in the park. The view straight into this glacial valley is, indeed, impressively alpine. (As I write this I have a photograph of a Pacific Northwest glacier scene from Mount Shuksan open on my computer, and it shares remarkable parallels with this photograph.) On this visit the effect was enhances by a recent dusting of early autumn snowfall that coats the mountains and the top of the huge rock glacier at the lower edge of the much smaller ice glacier.

G Dan Mitchell is a California photographer and visual opportunist. His book, "California’s Fall Color: A Photographer’s Guide to Autumn in the Sierra" is available from Heyday Books and Amazon.
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All media © Copyright G Dan Mitchell and others as indicated. Any use requires advance permission from G Dan Mitchell.

Posted by G Dan Mitchell on 2017-10-01 18:25:31

Tagged: , wheeler , peak , glacier , headwall , curque , basin , rocky , mountains , cliff , great basin , national , park , nevada , landscape , nature

SE5855

SE5855

Extinction of the dinosaurs. Computer artwork of a group of dinosaurs and flying reptiles fleeing a vast fire. This may have been caused by a volcanic eruption or meteorite impact. Such events have occurred before in Earth’s history, and will do so again. Both events can trigger a lowering of global temperatures as clouds of dust and ash reduce the amount of sunlight reaching the surface. Plant and then animal life dies off. The mass loss of life that included the extinction of the dinosaurs took place some 65 million years ago at the end of the Cretaceous period. The flying reptiles here are Pteranodons, and the quadraped dinosaur are sauropods called Titanosaurs.

Posted by Hssszn 讚新聞 on 2017-06-16 06:23:42

Tagged: , animal , asteroid impact , fire , flames , biological , zoological , nature , biology , computer artwork , cretaceous , dinosaur , disaster , global , catastrophe , doomed , extinct , dinosaurs , extinction event , volcano , fleeing , flying , quadraped , land , air , illustration , horizontal , landscape , paleontological , paleontology , prehistoric , wildlife , fauna , prehistory , pteranodon , reptile , reptiles , animals , meteorite , sauropod , titanosaur , titanosaurs , pteranodons , zoology

Switzerland holidays: A dive in Nature and Winter!

Switzerland holidays: A dive in Nature and Winter!

Known for its natural panoramic sceneries, Switzerland is a very beautiful country. People often quote it as one of the most unique countries of the world and say that if missed, a major piece of nature would remain inexperienced. Switzerland Holidays can be made wonderful by the ease offered by the travel portals that can arrange each and everything that is to be needed in a travel. More and more information can be gathered by the official Switzerland tourism websites and then there is Internet also meeting all information related needs. Sometimes services offered by such travel portals could be highly customized suitable to the individual needs of the traveler.

Also known for the winter sports, one could enjoy in snow as long he wishes to. People are known to invent more and more winter sports that could be enjoyed in snow apart from the traditional games like skiing.  Skiing has evolved with the help of technological advancements in sports. Heliskiing or Heliboarding is known to be a bit controversial (banned in few places already) but still never stops a visitor who wants to feel a bit of adrenalin rush. Then there are tobogganing and skating. Switzerland is deemed more beautiful as winter descends on it. Thus, people generally wish a getaway in form of Switzerland Holidays in winters especially. Switzerland tourism also seems to be promoting winters of this place rather than this place in itself. One could actually come to a decision on his own after paying one visit to the country.

In addition to this there are certain other top attractions of Switzerland tourism. Emmental cheese or simply Swiss cheese and Swiss Chocolates in food are known to everybody whom food interests more than any other thing. Then there is Swiss national Park, Derborence Mountain Lake, Lake Toma, and Nature Park Chateau-d’Oex with nature at its best. A peep in history and culture of Switzerland could be seen in places like San Gottardo Pass, Convent of St. John (Mustair), Mongo (Mountain Church), Gruyeres (a medieval town) and the list goes long adding certain more picturesque places. So once you plan out a Switzerland holiday, don’t forget to make a list of the places you want to visit else time would seem really less and places too many.

So whatever is the time for your Switzerland holidays are planned, Switzerland tourism is always leaves with more yearnings to return!

Emma D’suza is an expert author for travel articles who provides information about international holidays including Switzerland Holidays. Get all exclusive information about Switzerland Tourism and International Travel Packages.

More Replicant Urbanism Articles

First In A Long Time

First In A Long Time

Over the past year I’ve struggled to summon the ambition & inspiration to actually work on photos. So this past weekend I finally decided to dust of the old computer, recalibrate the monitor, and transfer the photos that were sitting on my camera. I was surprised to find this shot of a butterfly perched just outside of my kitchen window. I have to admit that it felt nice to dive in and bring out the best of the shot. I don’t know if this will trigger a flurry of flickr activity but I liked this one enough to want to post it.

Nikon D7000_Nikon 85mm f/1.4D_ISO400_f/3.2_1/200s

All Rights Reserved © Mike Dunckley_2015

Posted by MDunckley on 2015-09-30 20:01:41

Tagged: , Nikon D7000 , Nikon 85mm f/1.4D , nature , flower , insect , butterfly