IMG_5445

IMG_5445

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:33:14

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5417

IMG_5417

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:32:59

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5428

IMG_5428

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:33:04

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5413

IMG_5413

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:32:57

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5426

IMG_5426

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:33:03

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5414

IMG_5414

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:32:57

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5412

IMG_5412

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:32:57

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5416

IMG_5416

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:32:58

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Monument Valley Sunset

Monument Valley Sunset

Watching last thursday’s episode of Billy Connolly’s journey down Route 66 inspired me to take another look at my Monument Valley snaps. What a place!

I think I’ve got my settings wrong on my pc/monitor because this looks so much more vibrant on my computer than it does on my iPad. The difference isn’t usually that pronounced but with this shot it’s really apparent.

From monumentvalley.org :-

Monument Valley is one of the truly iconic places of the United States. It has been the setting for hundreds of Western movies, and its unique sandstone formations are instantly recognizable the world over.

The Valley is home to Navajo families that have lived there for generations.

Monument Valley is a part of the Navajo Nation. It is located on the Utah/Arizona border, east of Highway 163. The park entrance is in Utah. Admission to the park is $5 per person, and free for children under the age of 9.

For visitor information, contact Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park.

The park is open daily from 6am to 8pm from May through September and from 8am to 5pm from October through April.

Getting there

From Flagstaff, head east on Highway 40 to Highway 89 (Page, Grand Canyon Exit). Travel north on Highway 89 to Highway 160. Travel east on Highway 160 to Highway 163 (Kayenta exit). Travel north into Utah to Goulding’s Lodge then take Indian Route 40 southeast to the entrance to Monument Valley. The closest airport is Farmington, New Mexico. It is about two and a half hours east of the park.

Most of the scenic locations within Monument Valley are found within the Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park. At the edge of the valley, there is a visitor center, a small convenience store and the Haskenneini Restaurant, which specializes in both native Navajo and American cooking.

As this is not a federal park, National Park Passes or Golden Eagle Passes are not valid here.

“It’s breathtaking. You can’t believe it. It’s very photogenic; it has a kind of mythic feeling of age, of legend. . . . You’ve seen it in the movies, but when you see it in life, it’s so epic in its proportions that it almost stands for the whole of the West.” -Filmmaker Peter Bogdanovich.

Posted by Paul in Leeds on 2011-10-01 12:06:43

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