Gallery 3 – Erlea Maneros Zabala

Gallery 3 – Erlea Maneros Zabala

Erlea Maneros Zabala
Bilbao, 1979. Lives between Lekeitio, Basque Country and Joshua Tree, California.

Taiyuan Museum of Art, 2010, Taiyuan, China from “Pilgrimages for a New Economy”
Musée d’art de Taiyuan, 2010, Taiyuan, Chine de “Pélerinages pour une Nouvelle Economie”
2007–12
Impression numérique / Digital Print
10.2 × 15,2 cm ; Cadre / Frame: 52 × 43 cm

Guggenheim Museum, Bilbao, 1997, Bilbao, Basque Country from “Pilgrimages for a New Economy”
Musée Guggenhem, Bilbao, 1997, Pays Basque de “Pélerinages pour une Nouvelle Economie”
2007–12
Impression numérique / Digital Print
10.2 × 15,2 cm ; Cadre / Frame: 52 × 43 cm

Whitney Museum of American Art, 1966, New York City, USA from “Pilgrimages for a New Economy”
Musée d’art américain Whitney, 1966, New York City, USA de “Pélerinages pour une Nouvelle Economie”
2007–12
Impression numérique / Digital Print
10.2 × 15,2 cm ; Cadre / Frame: 52 × 43 cm

Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Herta and Paul Amir Building, 2011, Tel Aviv, Israel from “Pilgrimages for a New Economy”
Musée d’art de Tel Aviv, Bâtiment Herta et Paul Amir, 2011, Tel Aviv, Israël de “Pélerinages pour une Nouvelle Economie”
2007–12
Impression numérique / Digital Print
10.2 × 15,2 cm ; Cadre / Frame: 52 × 43 cm

San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, 1995, San Francisco, USA from “Pilgrimages for a New Economy”
Musée d’art moderne de San Francisco, 1995, San Francisco, USA de “Pélerinages pour une Nouvelle Economie”
2007–12
Impression numérique / Digital Print
10.2 × 15,2 cm ; Cadre / Frame: 52 × 43 cm

Museo Soumaya, 2011, Mexico City, Mexico from “Pilgrimages for a New Economy”
Musée Soumaya, 2011, Mexico City, Mexique de “Pélerinages pour une Nouvelle Economie”
2007–12
Impression numérique / Digital Print
10.2 × 15,2 cm ; Cadre / Frame: 52 × 43 cm

Niterói Contemporary Art Museum, 1996, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from “Pilgrimages for a New Economy”
Musée d’art contemporain Niterói, Niterói, Rio de Janeiro, Brésil de “Pélerinages pour une Nouvelle Economie”
2007–12
Impression numérique / Digital Print
10.2 × 15,2 cm ; Cadre / Frame: 52 × 43 cm

Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, 1974, Washington D.C., USA from “Pilgrimages for a New Economy”
Musée Hirshhorn et jardin de sculptures, 1974, Washington D.C., USA de “Pélerinages pour une Nouvelle Economie”
2007–12
Impression numérique / Digital Print
10.2 × 15,2 cm ; Cadre / Frame: 52 × 43 cm

Walker Art Center, 2005, Minneapolis, USA from “Pilgrimages for a New Economy”
Centre d’art Walker, 2005, Minneapolis, USA de “Pélerinages pour une Nouvelle Economie”
2007–12
Impression numérique / Digital Print
10.2 × 15,2 cm ; Cadre / Frame: 52 × 43 cm

Courtesy CarrerasMugica

For her series “Pilgrimages for a New Economy” Erlea Maneros Zabala photographed the uncanny presence of several well-known art museums as seen—sometimes obliquely—through the pixels, dirt and fingerprints of computer and tablet displays. The image of these cultural facilities is shorn of the polished conventions of architectural photography. Trophy museums, as well as the fetishistic surfaces of electronics, appear as resolutely grubby accumulations of materials marked by bodily traces as well as by dust, synonymous with disintegration and neglect. Maneros Zabala’s photographs seem to suggest a series of cleavages between the image, form, utility and material history of art museums especially whenever a camera-friendly building is designed to put a ‘gritty’ city ‘on the map’ and encourage investment.

The opening in 1997 of the Frank Gehry-designed branch of the Guggenheim in Maneros Zabala’s native city of Bilbao is frequently cited as a prototype for urban regeneration through contemporary art. Yet “Pilgrimages for a New Economy” connects a broad range of architecture, economies and substances, including the 2011 Soumaya Museum in Mexico City, funded by the telecoms magnate Carlos Slim, and the 2005 extension of the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota, founded in 1879 by the timber baron Thomas Barlow Walker (1840–1928).

Text: Latitudes
Photo courtesy: Latitudes/RK.

Posted by latitudes-flickr on 2017-07-05 16:44:53

Tagged: , 4543billion , 4543milliards , CAPC , Bordeaux , ColonialTrade , GeologicTime , PaysagesBordeaux , Matter , Lara Almarcegui , A.J. Aalders , Maria Thereza Alves , Félix Arnaudin , Amy Balkin , Alessandro Balteo-Yazbeck in collaboration with Media Farzin , Bernd Becher and Hilla Becher , Étienne Denisse , Hubert Duprat , Giulio Ferrario , Ângela Ferreira , Anne Garde , Ambroise-Louis Garneray , Terence Gower , Rodney Graham , Marianne Heier , Christina Hemauer and Roman Keller , Lucas Ihlein and Louise Kate Anderson , Jannis Kounellis , Martín Llavaneras , Erlea Maneros Zabala , Nicholas Mangan , Fiona Marron , Alexandra Navratil , Xavier Ribas , Alfred Roll , Amie Siegel , Lucy Skaer , Alfred Smith , Rayyane Tabet , Pierre Théron , Pep Vidal , Alexander Whalley Light , Université de Bordeaux. , Ilana Halperin , Stuart Whipps , Musée des Beaux-Arts , archives CAPC , Archives Bordeaux Métropole , Archives départementales de la Gironde , geology collection , UFR Sciences de la Terre et de la Mer

Telescope on the grass Under the Stars Astronomy

Telescope on the grass Under the Stars Astronomy

Telescope on the grass Under the Stars background

Astronomy (from Greek: αστρονομία) is a natural science that studies celestial objects and phenomena. It applies mathematics, physics, and chemistry, in an effort to explain the origin of those objects and phenomena and their evolution. Objects of interest include planets, moons, stars, galaxies, and comets; while the phenomena include supernova explosions, gamma ray bursts, and cosmic microwave background radiation. More generally, all astronomical phenomena that originate outside Earth’s atmosphere are within the purview of astronomy. A related but distinct subject, physical cosmology, is concerned with the study of the Universe as a whole.
Astronomy is the oldest of the natural sciences. The early civilizations in recorded history, such as the Babylonians, Greeks, Indians, Egyptians, Nubians, Iranians, Chinese, and Maya performed methodical observations of the night sky. Historically, astronomy has included disciplines as diverse as astrometry, celestial navigation, observational astronomy and the making of calendars, but professional astronomy is now often considered to be synonymous with astrophysics.
During the 20th century, the field of professional astronomy split into observational and theoretical branches. Observational astronomy is focused on acquiring data from observations of astronomical objects, which is then analyzed using basic principles of physics. Theoretical astronomy is oriented toward the development of computer or analytical models to describe astronomical objects and phenomena. The two fields complement each other, with theoretical astronomy seeking to explain the observational results and observations being used to confirm theoretical results.
Astronomy is one of the few sciences where amateurs can still play an active role, especially in the discovery and observation of transient phenomena. Amateur astronomers have made and contributed to many important astronomical discoveries, such as finding new comets.

Posted by scienceandtechnologysu on 2017-07-12 00:24:17

Tagged: , abstract , astrology , astronomy , atmosphere , background , black , blue , bright , clear , clouds , cluster , color , cosmos , deep , dusk , earth , explosion , fantasy , galaxy , graphic , idyllic , illustration , light , many , moon , nebula , night , open , orbit , outer , planet , pleiades , pure , science , shine , shiny , sky , solar , space , sparkle , star , starry , stars , grass , telescope , twinkle , universe , wallpaper , way , white , Thailand , Planets , Gases , Universal , dust , Dark , matter