Hot Shot Z Trains

Hot Shot Z Trains

In the last portion of the 20th Century, this train was known on the Atchinson, Topeka & Santa Fe as the 991. Seen here, the ZWSPNBY speeds through Empire, CA., on a warm afternoon. This train crew is doing their best to make up time as computers in Fort Worth, TX., are causing havoc system wide. Meanwhile, the Amtrak California San Joaquin train I was aiming for, leaves a trail of dust in the distance.

©FranksRails Photography, LLC.

Posted by FranksRails Photography, LLC. on 2017-08-21 15:44:23

Tagged: , Ambulance , EMS , Police , Firefighter , Pierce , Orion , Southern Pacific , Asti , Cloverdale , Amtrak , FranksRails Photography LLC. , Caltrain , AMTK , JPBX , UP , CDTX , Coast , Sub , Peninsula , Union , Pacific , California , Autoracks , Long , Exposures , Time , Lapses , VTA , Railroad , New , Flyer , Gillig , Rapid , Routes , Trains , Busses , Rails , S.M.A.R.T. , Sonoma-Marin , Area , Rail , Transit , DMU , Nippon , Sharyo , CHP , Sonoma County Sheriff , California Highway Patrol , Golden Gate Transit , North Western Pacific Railroad , NWP , NWPRR , KSFO , San Francisco International Airport , Boeing , Airbus , Embraer , Canadair , United Airlines , American Airlines , British Airlines , Luftansa , KLM , UAE , Corvette , C2 , Southwest Airlines , Modesto , MAX , Modesto Area Transit , StaRT , Stanislaus Regional Transit , Gillig Phantom , MAX Gillig Phantom

Keeping the Long Distance Relationship Alive – Is it Easy?

Keeping the Long Distance Relationship Alive – Is it Easy?

For a new relationship to last, constant care and attention is needed. For it to flourish, being together is essential. The same goes with dating. Since, it is the time for the two of you to get to know each other. But, what if the woman you love is a thousand miles away from you? Can this work? Keeping the long distance relationship alive – is it easy?

A lot might say that distance makes the heart go ponder. But, how long can this be possible for a brand new relationship before the heart takes the other way and forget? Loving and committing in general is not an uncomplicated thing to handle. We may all agree with this; in any relationship, being together contributes a lot in providing the relationship a stronger foundation. Although it is still possible to be together even when apart, with of the technology that we have these days, it still requires a great deal of effort to have a long distance relationship work. Committing is harder when the couple is apart from each other. There would be a lot of distractions. And love, as well as loyalty, can be heavily tested almost every second.Temptation will be harder to resist since the one that you love is quite far from you. There will be no barriers, of any sort, if you ever lose your grip and wake up in someone else’s bed.

Another difficulty that a long distance relationship can have is once an argument occurs with you and your partner.  The long distance can make it really hard for the two of you to patch things up. Communication is harder especially if one of you refuses to listen. Yet, I holding on to the saying “if there’s a will there’s a way,” can help you work things out. So, if you are in a long distance relationship and this happens to you, be sure to use all the tools available for the both of you to connect and settle whatever disagreements you two are dealing. Say, your partner doesn’t want to talk to you because you’ve been a jerk; then send a love letter. No one can resist curiosity when struck. If you will think about it, it’s easier to explain things in a letter especially, if the other doesn’t want to listen. Aside from that, a love letter is a very effective romantic gesture.

Adjustment in this situation is really difficult. But since we are talking about the love that sees no boundaries, then finding ways to make things bearable, acceptable and eventually happy is plausible. With the technology that we have these days, distance seems to be a nothing. Calling each other often can make her feel like you are just a few blocks away instead of being oceans apart. It is also easy to see her as if she’s just in the neighborhood by using the web cam and chatting the night away. It doesn’t need to be expensive since you can always use the net without hassles. Texting can make her feel your concern in just a few presses on your key pad.  Hail to the geniuses that gave us all these technologies.

If the question at hand is “keeping the long distance alive is easy?” – the answer is NO. In fact, keeping a relationship, long distance or so, old or new, always depends in you and your partner. It is mostly based on how much you really love each other and how much you are willing to sacrifice for each other. This might sound like a broken record but really, it’s the lovers and not just the love that make a relationship successful.

 

Don’t Let Jealousy Ruin Your Long Distance Relationship

Don’t Let Jealousy Ruin Your Long Distance Relationship

By Susie and Otto Collins

Samantha didn’t think that she’d find love again after getting divorced and being so emotionally hurt by her ex-husband, but now she has. Over an internet message board, she and Jason struck up a friendship that turned into a love relationship.

The challenge is that Samantha and Jason live in different countries. They both want to make their long distance relationship work, but they’re having a tough time of it. Yes, there are plenty of fun and passionate times that they share via phone, internet and other means of communication.

There are also too many times when Samantha becomes worried and jealous. She is afraid that Jason will cheat on her just like her ex-husband did. Her jealous tirades and breakdowns, that she periodically has in front of Jason, often surprise her as much as they do him.

Even though Samantha and Jason love one another, both of them wonder if their relationship has a chance.

If you are in a long distance relationship, you might find that you have to work extra hard to stay connected. While you can certainly interact and even be intimate across the miles thanks to various forms of technology (and your creativity), it is easy for distance and disconnection to develop.

If one, or both, of you has a tendency to get jealous, this can be even more destructive in a long distance relationship.

Here’s why…

When you don’t get to see your partner face-to-face and in real life for long periods of time– or ever– you might start to fill in the blanks when you are apart.

This can certainly happen in a love relationship or marriage in which the couple lives in the same house too. But, it’s usually more likely to happen with long distance relationships.

For this reason, it is vital that you learn how to calm yourself down and start to really question the assumptions you are making. These assumptions and guesses are often what fuel jealousy.

Because your interactions across the miles are so precious, if you are all stirred up and feeling jealous, it will show. Your tone of voice, body language, word choice, and more will betray that you are grappling with jealousy.

You might not be able to contain your worries and find yourself asking accusatory questions of your partner– even if you hadn’t intended to. This will undoubtedly lead to tension, conflict and distance between you and your mate.

Here’s what you can do about it…

Try to understand what triggers jealousy for you.
Do you become jealous when your partner talks about taking part in particular activities or when he or she mentions a certain person? When you pinpoint what the trigger is, you can get more information– in ways that aren’t interrogating or accusatory.

This information can help you to dispel the stories that you might be creating in your mind about your partner.

One way to ask for more information is this: “Can you please tell me more about…” or “Can you please help me to understand…”

Use words that bring you closer together instead of putting your partner on the defensive.

When you look for what triggers jealousy for you, it might become clear that painful past experiences are leading you to read more into current situations than is really there.

If this is the case for you, practice bringing yourself back to the present moment. Catch yourself when you begin to think thoughts like, “He will cheat on me just like my ex did” or “She is just like all of the rest of women I’ve ever dated– I can’t trust her.”

Deliberately bring yourself back to right here and right now and ask yourself if the statement you just told yourself is accurate and that you really know this to be true.

 

 

 

Find out the “5 Keys to a Great Relationship” in this free e-mail mini-course from Susie and Otto Collins.

Susie and Otto Collins are relationship coaches and authors who help couples communicate, connect and create the passionate relationships they desire. They have written these e-books and programs: Magic Relationship Words, Relationship Trust Turnaround, No More Jealousy and Stop Talking on Eggshells among many others.

How Can I Get My Ex Love Back and Know That He or She Will Be in For the Long Haul?

How Can I Get My Ex Love Back and Know That He or She Will Be in For the Long Haul?

If you have just been through the break up of a lifetime and you are desperately wondering “how can I get my ex love back?” then you just happen to be in the right frame of mind to uncover some of the most widely used, proven psychological tips to reclaim your lost love once more. Despite being through a monumental break up, and circumstances seeming hopeless, you can still rekindle the flames of passion between you and your ex. If prisoners who have been locked away for years can come out and reunite with their exes, surely you can. It simply involves knowing how to tap into the human nature. To discover how to do this, read on.

The key to getting back into your ex’s heart is first being aware of what caused the break up. As with every problem in life, once the cause is known, you are in a better position to find the best possible solution. Carefully mull over the circumstances of your relationship and consequent break up. What mistake could you have made? Or was it simply a case of neglect/take for granted? Once you have come to the conclusion of what caused the break up, you can then move on to the next step in getting back your ex.

Now that you are armed with this critical information, at this point you need to apologize to your ex. If you are serious about rekindling your relationship, there is no avoiding this, so you need to do it right. The majority of people who have separated from their partner are either too proud or too scared to say they’re sorry, but making this crucial step will indicate to your partner that you want to save the union you once shared with them. The best way to apologize is to keep it simple, clear and concise. Don’t appear needy or over emotional, but make sure you’re genuine and sincere.

At this point your ex will realize how serious you are about saving the relationship, but you still need to hive him/her some time to think things through. So instead of pouncing on your ex after the apology, you need to do the complete opposite and give you ex ample space. While on this self-imposed “breather”, you can focus on you and get involved in activities you truly enjoy. Once you are happy, your ex will see that, and will want to a part of your happiness as well.

Now Here’s the deal, Pay Close Attention,

Getting Over Jealousy – Relationship Problem Advice For the Long Haul

Getting Over Jealousy – Relationship Problem Advice For the Long Haul

Good looks, fancy cars and a ton of money will do very little to keep your relationship running like a fine tuned engine. These things are great for making a first impression, but your attitude is the key to longevity in any relationship.

Great relationships work when competition stops and team work begins. Keep the competition for sporting events and out of your relationship. Everything will work and run a whole lot smother when you are both on the same team.

Conversation is a key element that is often overlooked. One sided conversations will go nowhere. Conversations can be about anything and everything, sharing plans and goals, discussing how good or bad each others day went and actually listening to what your mate has to say will pay out big dividends in the long run. Everyone has a need to speak and be heard at times. Being silent will bring about nothing but loneliness and a very unhappy and boring relationship.

Being possessive is a sure fire way to shorten your relationship. Always keep in mind, you can own homes and cars and all sorts of material things, but people can never be owned. Everyone needs their own space free of jealousy and possessiveness. From the beginning of time these two items alone are probably responsible for the undoing of many a great relationship. Coping with jealousy and getting over jealousy may be the toughest single item your relationship will suffer.

Relationships should be based on giving, not receiving. Bring romance to a higher level by keeping your partner first and foremost in your mind at all times. Letting your partner know that they are the most important part of your life will in turn bring many positive rewards back to you. Being selfish will gain you absolutely nothing. Keep romance alive after the newness has worn off and it will still be paying you dividends in your later years.

Working out the problems in your relationship means being flexible in how you deal with them. Work on the solutions that will work beneficially to both of you. Relationships are give and take. Always make sure you put a very strong emphasis on the give.

Smooth running relationships take a lot of hard work but no one can do everything by themselves. A basketball or football team cannot operate with just one person and neither can your relationship. Keep your communication lines open at all times and always keep in your mind that every argument has two sides to it. Work extremely hard at getting over jealousy. Work out a solution that will be agreeable to both of you and never ever go to bed angry.

Getting over Jealousy and keeping your relationship on track takes work. Trying to work with an uncooperative mate may take more advanced tactics. Find out more at RelationshipAdviceSuperTips.com

1_52

1_52

To purchase this print: www.redbubble.com/people/parmi/works/8316578-1-52?c=12154…

Meet my 1940s Ansco Rediflex viewfinder camera. This little guy has been a good mate to me over the last two years, coming on many a shoot, capturing the world and transporting it back in time using the TTV Technique.
This viewfinder will be the main subject and theme of my Project 1/52, a year long assignment created by Johanna Brunet capture one photo per week for 52 weeks. Around 50 photographers have taken on this venture, all choosing a theme and subject and challenging ourselves to create unique images each week with it.
I attempted a similar project just over a year ago, to take 3 photos a day for a year, but that fell apart quickly.. 3 photos a day is way to ambitious for someone who spends a lot of time behind a computer, editing!! One a week.. now that’s a lot more realistic and motivating 🙂

Posted by Andrew Paranavitana on 2012-02-09 08:32:51

Tagged: , photomanipulation , manipulation , grunge , scratch , haze , shadow , dark , stain , mark , dust , layer , andrew , paranavitana , nostalgic , nostalgia , old , worn , card , canvas , print , framed , viewfinder , ansco , rediflex , camera , project 1 52 , year , long , texture , lens , sepia , monotone , parmi , dof , blur , black , light , still , life , antique , vintage , facebook , canon , 50d

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

‘The Dish’ is a well known Australian movie about how this radio telescope at Parkes, NSW, played a major role covering the moon landing in 1969.

I had seen both the movie and some amazing images taken by Simon, a member of Barossa Photography Club so I thought I would also give it a go. Each of these exposures took about 30 minutes – I didn’t get there until nearly 10pm so these (and some which didn’t work out) meant it was getting very late when I finished!

From: www.csiro.au/Portals/Education/Programs/Parkes-Radio-Tele…

The Telescope

CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope is a 64-m diameter parabolic dish used for radio astronomy. It is located about 20 km north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), and about 380 km west of Sydney.

It is operated by CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), a business unit of CSIRO. CASS also operates the Australia Telescope Compact Array near Narrabri, NSW, and the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and is developing the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope in Western Australia.

The telescope was built in 1961, but only its basic structure has remained unchanged. The surface, control system, focus cabin, receivers, computers and cabling have all been upgraded – some parts many times – to keep the telescope current.

The telescope is now ten thousand times more sensitive than when commissioned in 1961.
Using the Telescope

The telescope operates twenty four hours per day, through rain and cloud. About 85 per cent of all time each year is scheduled for observing. Less than five per cent of that is lost because of high winds or equipment problems. Most of the rest of the time each year is used for maintenance and testing. Around 300 researchers use the telescope each year, and more than 40 per cent of these users are from overseas.

The moving part of the dish is not fixed to the top of the tower but just sits on it. Because the large surface catches the wind like a sail, the telescope must be ‘stowed’ (pointed directly up) when the wind exceeds 35 km an hour.
Radio Astronomy

The radio waves from objects in space are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. The power received from a strong cosmic radio source by the Parkes telescope is about a hundredth of a millionth of a millionth of a watt (10-14 W). If you wanted to heat water with this power it would take about 70 000 years to heat one drop by one degree Celsius.

Galaxies contain stars, gas and dust. The gas – mostly hydrogen – is the raw material from which stars form. It emits radio waves, at a frequency of 1420 MHz. Radio astronomers spend a lot of time studying this gas, learning where it is and how it is moving.

Astronomers don’t look through the telescope. Instead, signal processing systems and computers take the radio waves the telescope collects and turns them into pictures (like photographs) of objects in space.

I was very lucky to get the loan of a car and drive to Sydney – a distance of some 1,400 kilometers (around 750 miles). Having seen some amazing night shots of the radio telescope at Parkes, I decided to go that way and spend my first night at Parkes.

Posted by Strabanephotos on 2013-09-09 07:12:54

Tagged: , The , Dish , CSIRO , Radio , Telescope , Parkes , New , South , Wales , Australia , nsw , monday , 2nd , september , 2013 , long , exposure , star , trails , celestial , pole

Stars circling around the Celestial South Pole, The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

Stars circling around the Celestial South Pole, The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

‘The Dish’ is a well known Australian movie about how this radio telescope at Parkes, NSW, played a major role covering the moon landing in 1969.

I had seen both the movie and some amazing images taken by Simon, a member of Barossa Photography Club so I thought I would also give it a go. Each of these exposures took about 30 minutes – I didn’t get there until nearly 10pm so these (and some which didn’t work out) meant it was getting very late when I finished!

From: www.csiro.au/Portals/Education/Programs/Parkes-Radio-Tele…

The Telescope

CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope is a 64-m diameter parabolic dish used for radio astronomy. It is located about 20 km north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), and about 380 km west of Sydney.

It is operated by CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), a business unit of CSIRO. CASS also operates the Australia Telescope Compact Array near Narrabri, NSW, and the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and is developing the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope in Western Australia.

The telescope was built in 1961, but only its basic structure has remained unchanged. The surface, control system, focus cabin, receivers, computers and cabling have all been upgraded – some parts many times – to keep the telescope current.

The telescope is now ten thousand times more sensitive than when commissioned in 1961.
Using the Telescope

The telescope operates twenty four hours per day, through rain and cloud. About 85 per cent of all time each year is scheduled for observing. Less than five per cent of that is lost because of high winds or equipment problems. Most of the rest of the time each year is used for maintenance and testing. Around 300 researchers use the telescope each year, and more than 40 per cent of these users are from overseas.

The moving part of the dish is not fixed to the top of the tower but just sits on it. Because the large surface catches the wind like a sail, the telescope must be ‘stowed’ (pointed directly up) when the wind exceeds 35 km an hour.
Radio Astronomy

The radio waves from objects in space are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. The power received from a strong cosmic radio source by the Parkes telescope is about a hundredth of a millionth of a millionth of a watt (10-14 W). If you wanted to heat water with this power it would take about 70 000 years to heat one drop by one degree Celsius.

Galaxies contain stars, gas and dust. The gas – mostly hydrogen – is the raw material from which stars form. It emits radio waves, at a frequency of 1420 MHz. Radio astronomers spend a lot of time studying this gas, learning where it is and how it is moving.

Astronomers don’t look through the telescope. Instead, signal processing systems and computers take the radio waves the telescope collects and turns them into pictures (like photographs) of objects in space.

I was very lucky to get the loan of a car and drive to Sydney – a distance of some 1,400 kilometers (around 750 miles). Having seen some amazing night shots of the radio telescope at Parkes, I decided to go that way and spend my first night at Parkes.

Posted by Strabanephotos on 2013-09-09 07:13:00

Tagged: , The , Dish , CSIRO , Radio , Telescope , Parkes , New , South , Wales , Australia , nsw , monday , 2nd , september , 2013 , long , exposure , star , trails , celestial , pole

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

The dish was continually moving – usually by small amounts, presumably as the stars moved – but it the middle of a 30 minute exposure it made a huge movement. So the dish is turning round, you can see the stars moving round, the earth is spinning – made me feel quite dizzy 🙂

‘The Dish’ is a well known Australian movie about how this radio telescope at Parkes, NSW, played a major role covering the moon landing in 1969.

I had seen both the movie and some amazing images taken by Simon, a member of Barossa Photography Club so I thought I would also give it a go. Each of these exposures took about 30 minutes – I didn’t get there until nearly 10pm so these (and some which didn’t work out) meant it was getting very late when I finished!

From: www.csiro.au/Portals/Education/Programs/Parkes-Radio-Tele…

The Telescope

CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope is a 64-m diameter parabolic dish used for radio astronomy. It is located about 20 km north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), and about 380 km west of Sydney.

It is operated by CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), a business unit of CSIRO. CASS also operates the Australia Telescope Compact Array near Narrabri, NSW, and the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and is developing the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope in Western Australia.

The telescope was built in 1961, but only its basic structure has remained unchanged. The surface, control system, focus cabin, receivers, computers and cabling have all been upgraded – some parts many times – to keep the telescope current.

The telescope is now ten thousand times more sensitive than when commissioned in 1961.
Using the Telescope

The telescope operates twenty four hours per day, through rain and cloud. About 85 per cent of all time each year is scheduled for observing. Less than five per cent of that is lost because of high winds or equipment problems. Most of the rest of the time each year is used for maintenance and testing. Around 300 researchers use the telescope each year, and more than 40 per cent of these users are from overseas.

The moving part of the dish is not fixed to the top of the tower but just sits on it. Because the large surface catches the wind like a sail, the telescope must be ‘stowed’ (pointed directly up) when the wind exceeds 35 km an hour.
Radio Astronomy

The radio waves from objects in space are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. The power received from a strong cosmic radio source by the Parkes telescope is about a hundredth of a millionth of a millionth of a watt (10-14 W). If you wanted to heat water with this power it would take about 70 000 years to heat one drop by one degree Celsius.

Galaxies contain stars, gas and dust. The gas – mostly hydrogen – is the raw material from which stars form. It emits radio waves, at a frequency of 1420 MHz. Radio astronomers spend a lot of time studying this gas, learning where it is and how it is moving.

Astronomers don’t look through the telescope. Instead, signal processing systems and computers take the radio waves the telescope collects and turns them into pictures (like photographs) of objects in space.

I was very lucky to get the loan of a car and drive to Sydney – a distance of some 1,400 kilometers (around 750 miles). Having seen some amazing night shots of the radio telescope at Parkes, I decided to go that way and spend my first night at Parkes.

Posted by Strabanephotos on 2013-09-09 07:13:06

Tagged: , The , Dish , CSIRO , Radio , Telescope , Parkes , New , South , Wales , Australia , nsw , monday , 2nd , september , 2013 , long , exposure , star , trails , celestial , pole

Office Chair

Office Chair

Visit www.vanishingnewengland.com for more photos and stories.

Posted by www.vanishingnewengland.com on 2015-07-31 18:17:31

Tagged: , Leavens , Awards , Trophies , Certificates , Printing , Manufacturing , Attleboro , Massachusetts , USA , Urbex , Urban , Exploration , Industry , Industrial , Computers , Keyboard , 90’s , decay , abandoned , building , trash , destroyed , graffiti , paint , tag , pipes , rot , water , insulation , shelves , adventure , trespassing , off , limits , explore , history , end , an , era , good , ole , days , historical , Bryan , Buckley , Canon , 70D , Tokina , 12-24 , long , exposure , dark , creepy , scary , horror , 2015 , July , Summer , overgrown , Nature , trees , bushes , moss , mold , asbestos , danger , dust