Isolation Project

Isolation Project

I’ve posted several photos of scanned slides lately, so I thought it would be fun to show where the project is being done. The trash bag is the fourth one I’ve filled with discarded slides, along with several smaller bags. The shoebox is one of 42 similar boxes full of slides dating back as far as 1965. The scanner is an Epson Perfection V800 that scans 12 slides at a time and does a remarkable job removing dust spots. I use Vuescan software and an electronic dust blower, and have a slide database that dates back to the pre-windows DOS operating system days. The database needs to be updated whenever I delete or add slides to the scanned collection. So far, I’ve scanned over 4100 slides and discarded, probably, 40,000 slides and am working on my 18th shoebox. It has been a ton of work, but brought back a lot of great memories. Please excuse the messy workspace.

Posted by walkerross42 on 2020-05-18 03:12:51

Tagged: , slide , film , scanner , computer , box , Kodak , screen , archive , backup , desk , viewer

Evaluating the Negative Lab Pro plugin

Evaluating the Negative Lab Pro plugin

Kodak Ektar 100 | Mamiya RZ67 | negative processed at home and photographed with my Sony A7R-iii


This is a quick summary of my observations using Negative Film Lab to perform the surprisingly non-trivial conversion from color negative to finished image.


1. TLDR; I was impressed enough after playing with Negative Lab Pro this morning I purchased a license. That says it all.
.
2. The film was processed by me back in May 2018. I had not yet thrown those twirling stick agitators into the recycle bin yet, so the film is unevenly developed. There was more activity at the edges of the strip than the middle because the edges got exposure to fresher chemistry. TLDR? Inversion is the only way to agitate. YMMV. This is what works for me. Inversion agitation totally stopped the uneven development problem.
.
3. Compared to my prior workflow using Silverfast, this plugin is a breeze. I can stay in one program all the way from camera raw file to print ready image file. I’ll compare workflows in the comment area so you can decide for yourself.
.
4. Digitizing the image consists of carefully doing a macro photo of the negative on a light table. Any modern DSLR or mirrorless camera will work, but if you plan to print big, the 40+ megapixel cameras are ideal. A quality macro lens is also vital, as is a means of securely mounting everything. I use heavy duty woodworking clamps from Lowes to mount a Kirk ballhead to a sturdy workbench; thinking hardware store rather than camera store saves you a lot of cash! A scanning mask is strongly advised as stray light can enter the edges of the film. Reflections can also be an issue, as can lens flare. A mask helps with all of these. Stray light will wreck your results.
.
5. Follow the instructions that come with the Negative Lab plugin. If you do it right, the end result will be an image which requires only minor corrections and spotting in Photoshop/Lightroom to finish it off.


I’ll let the image speak for itself. Because of the ridiculous amount of compression Instagram uses, I will be posting these images to my Flickr account as well. The link is in my bio. More info in the comments area.

I want it to be known that I am not trying to sell anybody anything. One of the biggest problems for a film shooter in 2019 is how to actually do something useful with the film once you’ve shot it and developed it. Quality scanners are expensive and slow. Hiring a company to handle the job is also expensive and slow, plus it takes the photographer out of the loop as far as the overall look of the resultant images. Color negative scanning offers a massive amount of latitude for one’s artistic vision, you don’t really want to leave that in the hands of someone else.
.
After studying every affordable option for scanning medium format film, I concluded that scanning with a high megapixel digital camera was the best option. Once everything is set up, it’s undeniably fast, much faster than high-quality medium format scanners. As for results, if you carefully scan a 6 x 9 negative (or positive for that matter), you end up with a 42 megapixel image in the case of the Sony A7R-iii that I use. That’s more than enough information to create high-quality 24” x 36“ prints.
.
Honestly, the resolution isn’t the problem. The problem has always been converting a color negative into a color positive.
.
Last winter when I began seriously looking into this problem, I tried everything that was on the market at that time. I quickly settled on Silverfast as the best of a not so perfect lot. It wasn’t perfect because the software is expensive, the user interface is downright hostile, and the whole thing feels like a Windows 98 era program ready to crash and burn at any given moment.
.
Even with the issues it has, Silverfast undeniably does produce quality output. At a license cost of $250 for a basic version and $400 for one that actually doesn’t go out of its way to slow you down at every opportunity, it had damned well better at least deliver good output. So why am I so excited about this new Lightroom plugin? Take a look at the workflow for the two solutions:
.
Silverfast HDR 8.8
.
1. Copy raw files from memory card into temp directory on computer
2. Install the Adobe DNG converter
3. Install MakeTiff from color perfect
4. Convert your camera raw files into linear tiff files
5. Import linear tiff files into Silverfast
6. Perform the necessary adjustments to each photograph inside of Silverfast to get optimal output
7. Kick off Silverfast batch job to create positive tiff files
8. Import tiff files into Lightroom (jumping into Photoshop as needed for heavy lifting) for cataloging, dust spotting, cropping, and creation of final output files
.
Negative Lab Pro
.
1. Import raw files from memory card into Lightroom
2. Crop images and perform a white balance with the eyedropper on orange mask as instructed in the Negative Lab Pro video
3. Start the plug-in and again follow the directions in the instructional video
4. Perform final edits such as dust spotting, color tweaking, cropping and so on. Edit in Photoshop for heavy lifting tasks like content aware fill. Export final output files from Lightroom as needed.
.
It’s up to you, both methods work just fine. I am keeping Silverfast around because there are a few tasks it excels at, such as getting optimum results from seriously expired film. That said, with excellent image quality plus the speed and simplicity advantages, the Negative Lab Pro plug-in will be taking over my medium format camera scanned work.
.
I hope this information helps you enjoy the art of analog photography as much as I do.

Posted by dv over dt on 2019-01-26 18:42:47

Tagged: , Kodak , NegativeLabPro , Ektar100

Evaluating the Negative Lab Pro plugin

Evaluating the Negative Lab Pro plugin

Kodak Ektar 100 | Mamiya RZ67 | negative processed at home and photographed with my Sony A7R-iii


This is a quick summary of my observations using Negative Film Lab to perform the surprisingly non-trivial conversion from color negative to finished image.


1. TLDR; I was impressed enough after playing with Negative Lab Pro this morning I purchased a license. That says it all.
.
2. The film was processed by me back in May 2018. I had not yet thrown those twirling stick agitators into the recycle bin yet, so the film is unevenly developed. There was more activity at the edges of the strip than the middle because the edges got exposure to fresher chemistry. TLDR? Inversion is the only way to agitate. YMMV. This is what works for me. Inversion agitation totally stopped the uneven development problem.
.
3. Compared to my prior workflow using Silverfast, this plugin is a breeze. I can stay in one program all the way from camera raw file to print ready image file. I’ll compare workflows in the comment area so you can decide for yourself.
.
4. Digitizing the image consists of carefully doing a macro photo of the negative on a light table. Any modern DSLR or mirrorless camera will work, but if you plan to print big, the 40+ megapixel cameras are ideal. A quality macro lens is also vital, as is a means of securely mounting everything. I use heavy duty woodworking clamps from Lowes to mount a Kirk ballhead to a sturdy workbench; thinking hardware store rather than camera store saves you a lot of cash! A scanning mask is strongly advised as stray light can enter the edges of the film. Reflections can also be an issue, as can lens flare. A mask helps with all of these. Stray light will wreck your results.
.
5. Follow the instructions that come with the Negative Lab plugin. If you do it right, the end result will be an image which requires only minor corrections and spotting in Photoshop/Lightroom to finish it off.


I’ll let the image speak for itself. Because of the ridiculous amount of compression Instagram uses, I will be posting these images to my Flickr account as well. The link is in my bio. More info in the comments area.

I want it to be known that I am not trying to sell anybody anything. One of the biggest problems for a film shooter in 2019 is how to actually do something useful with the film once you’ve shot it and developed it. Quality scanners are expensive and slow. Hiring a company to handle the job is also expensive and slow, plus it takes the photographer out of the loop as far as the overall look of the resultant images. Color negative scanning offers a massive amount of latitude for one’s artistic vision, you don’t really want to leave that in the hands of someone else.
.
After studying every affordable option for scanning medium format film, I concluded that scanning with a high megapixel digital camera was the best option. Once everything is set up, it’s undeniably fast, much faster than high-quality medium format scanners. As for results, if you carefully scan a 6 x 9 negative (or positive for that matter), you end up with a 42 megapixel image in the case of the Sony A7R-iii that I use. That’s more than enough information to create high-quality 24” x 36“ prints.
.
Honestly, the resolution isn’t the problem. The problem has always been converting a color negative into a color positive.
.
Last winter when I began seriously looking into this problem, I tried everything that was on the market at that time. I quickly settled on Silverfast as the best of a not so perfect lot. It wasn’t perfect because the software is expensive, the user interface is downright hostile, and the whole thing feels like a Windows 98 era program ready to crash and burn at any given moment.
.
Even with the issues it has, Silverfast undeniably does produce quality output. At a license cost of $250 for a basic version and $400 for one that actually doesn’t go out of its way to slow you down at every opportunity, it had damned well better at least deliver good output. So why am I so excited about this new Lightroom plugin? Take a look at the workflow for the two solutions:
.
Silverfast HDR 8.8
.
1. Copy raw files from memory card into temp directory on computer
2. Install the Adobe DNG converter
3. Install MakeTiff from color perfect
4. Convert your camera raw files into linear tiff files
5. Import linear tiff files into Silverfast
6. Perform the necessary adjustments to each photograph inside of Silverfast to get optimal output
7. Kick off Silverfast batch job to create positive tiff files
8. Import tiff files into Lightroom (jumping into Photoshop as needed for heavy lifting) for cataloging, dust spotting, cropping, and creation of final output files
.
Negative Lab Pro
.
1. Import raw files from memory card into Lightroom
2. Crop images and perform a white balance with the eyedropper on orange mask as instructed in the Negative Lab Pro video
3. Start the plug-in and again follow the directions in the instructional video
4. Perform final edits such as dust spotting, color tweaking, cropping and so on. Edit in Photoshop for heavy lifting tasks like content aware fill. Export final output files from Lightroom as needed.
.
It’s up to you, both methods work just fine. I am keeping Silverfast around because there are a few tasks it excels at, such as getting optimum results from seriously expired film. That said, with excellent image quality plus the speed and simplicity advantages, the Negative Lab Pro plug-in will be taking over my medium format camera scanned work.
.
I hope this information helps you enjoy the art of analog photography as much as I do.

Posted by dv over dt on 2019-01-26 18:42:49

Tagged: , NegativeLabPro , Kodak , Ektar100

Shepard mix LGP 12-21-16 1

Shepard mix LGP 12-21-16 1

A German Shepard mix, or a purebred G.S. (I don’t remember purebreds having this kind of long fur, though…) comes through Looking Glass Photography. (a camera store in Berkeley, CA…) I apparently had the lens on an outdoor ƒ stop (probably ƒ 8…) and the shutter speed for that stop was apparently 1/8 to 1/15 of a second (camera was in Aperture-Priority AE…) – the camera stayed still, but the dog looked around when he/she (the photographer didn’t look…) heard the first curtain fire, and the mirror flap… (since the mirror wasn’t locked up…) Taken by a Nikon F3 with a Nikkor 50mm ƒ 1.4 AIs lens on Kodak Portra 400 film.

Scanned into computer by an Epson V700, with the Epson software.

Yes, that’s dust by the dog’s hind leg…

Posted by THE Holy Hand Grenade! on 2017-03-09 20:24:25

Tagged: , Dog , German Shepard , ¿mutt? , Looking Glass Photography , Berkeley, CA , Nikon F3 , Nikkor 50mm ƒ 1.4 AIs , Kodak , Portra 400 , geotagged

Hyatt House E bedroom 1 7-14 2

Hyatt House E bedroom 1 7-14 2

The room for my overnight stay at the Hyatt House, Emeryville, CA, while awaiting a train trip the next morning. (getting to the station on time for my train, at this time, (0720) is problematic in the AM from Albany, where I live…) Taken from the corner opposite the bathroom door by a Nikon F3 with a Nikkor 24mm ƒ 2.0 AIs lens on Kodak U-Max 400 film. Exposure is in the 1/15 sec @ ƒ 3.5 range…

Scanned into computer by an Epson V700, with the Epson software. As always with scanned film, work was done in Paint Shop Pro x8 to clean up dust/dirt, and, in this case, to make the color rendition closer to "normal".

Taken by the shortest lens I had with me on the trip… (my 20mm and 15mm stayed home…) Trip (to Tijuana…) will continue through this roll of 36! (this is only shot # 8…)

The camera bag for my non-AF Nikon cameras and lenses is seen below the microwave.

The Hyatt House also has suites, and I stayed in one on my return from Tijuana. (the train got in after 2300!)

Posted by THE Holy Hand Grenade! on 2017-10-19 18:22:41

Tagged: , hotel room , Hyatt House , Emeryville, CA , Nikon F3 , Nikkor 24mm ƒ 2 AIs , Kodak , U-Max 400 , geotagged

Hyatt House E bathroom 1 7-14 1

Hyatt House E bathroom 1 7-14 1

The bathroom of my room for my overnight stay at the Hyatt House, Emeryville, CA, while awaiting a train trip the next morning. (getting to the station on time for my train, at this time, (0720) is problematic in the AM from Albany, where I live…) Taken the bathroom door by a Nikon F3 with a Nikkor 24mm ƒ 2.0 AIs lens on Kodak U-Max 400 film. Exposure is in the 1/15 sec @ ƒ 5.6 range…

Scanned into computer by an Epson V700, with the Epson software. As always with scanned film, work was done in Paint Shop Pro x8 to clean up dust/dirt, and, in this case, to make the color rendition closer to "normal".

Taken by the shortest lens I had with me on the trip… (my 20mm and 15mm stayed home…)

Posted by THE Holy Hand Grenade! on 2017-10-21 18:44:36

Tagged: , bathroom , Hyatt House , Emeryville Train Station , Emeryville, CA , Nikon F3 , Nikkor 24mm ƒ 2 AIs , Kodak , U-Max 400 , geotagged

35mm Film – Roll 1.

35mm Film - Roll 1.

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Currently in the process of scanning every single negative strip that I’ve shot thus far.
Looking through the negatives on the computer, I’m seeing so many pictures I never saw or noticed before.
They’ll be uploaded in order of when they were shot, starting with the second roll of film I ever shot (the first roll was destroyed because I didn’t wind it properly &then was exposed to light).
I have around 30 rolls of film I’ll be scanning over the next however many days/weeks.

Scanned from the negative &slightly tweaked in Photoshop. A separate print was made in the darkroom for class.
Excuse my poor scanning skills.
Water spots &dust everywhere, I know.

Posted by Ashleigh Brooke | www.Ashleigh-Brooke.com on 2011-02-25 01:50:52

Tagged: , 35 , mm , film , black , white , b&w , kodak , tmax , 400 , canon , ae-1 , 35mm

Mer Bandshell 3-14-13

Mer Bandshell 3-14-13

The bandshell or outdoor stage (it is used for both…) in Applegate Park in Merced, CA. Taken by a Nikon F4s with a Nikon 28-80 ƒ 3.3-5.6 G lens on Kodak Portra 400 film Exposure data unrecorded. Negative scanned into computer by an HP G4010, dust reduction done in Paint Shop Pro X2.

Posted by THE Holy Hand Grenade! on 2013-04-08 18:24:23

Tagged: , Merced, CA , Nikon F4s , Nikon 28-80mm , geotagged , Kodak , Portra 400

qLogic chip on drive

qLogic chip on drive

A qLogic chip on a Fujitsu 73 Gb SCSI hard drive. Taken in Albany, CA by a Nikkormat FT2 with a Micro-Nikkor 55mm ƒ3.5 lens on Kodak Portra 400NC. Negative scanned into computer by an HP G4010. Dust removal, color and gamma correction done in Paint Shop Pro Photo X2.

this is 1:2 (or half life size…) on the film plane.

What the chip does, I have no idea, as I can’t find any reference to it on Qlogic’s site

Posted by THE Holy Hand Grenade! on 2011-03-24 20:38:39

Tagged: , qLogic , Kodak , Portra 400NC , Albany, CA , Nikon D40x , Micro-Nikkor 55mm ƒ 3.5 AI

80 to 68 pin SCSI converter

80 to 68 pin SCSI converter

Close-up of a 68 to 80 pin (or vice-versa…) SCSI converter board, seen from the 68 pin side. Taken in Albany, CA by a Nikkormat FT2 with a Micro-Nikkor 55mm ƒ3.5 lens on Kodak Portra 400NC. Negative scanned into computer by an HP G4010. Dust removal, color and gamma correction done in Paint Shop Pro Photo X2. Cropped to eliminate excess background.

This is 1:3 (I.E. 1/3 life size) on the film plane… and taken from a range of about 14 inches…

Posted by THE Holy Hand Grenade! on 2011-03-24 20:36:57

Tagged: , SCSI , Nikkormat FT2 , Kodak , Portra 400NC , Albany, CA , Micro-Nikkor 55mm ƒ 3.5 AI