Mariette Hartley, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Mariette Hartley, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2017-10-08 17:49:46

Tagged: , Leonard Nimoy , DeForest Kelley , Mariette Hartley , Star Trek , television , actor , actress , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , hat , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , niña bonita , hübsches Mädchen , hübsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , hair , hair style , atriz , woman , girl , schön , lady

Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2017-10-08 17:49:42

Tagged: , Leonard Nimoy , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , hat , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll

William Shatner, Anna Karen, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

William Shatner, Anna Karen, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2017-10-08 17:49:47

Tagged: , William Shatner , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , hat , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll , Anna Karen , actress , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , niña bonita , hübsches Mädchen , hübsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , hair , hair style , atriz , woman , girl , schön , lady

DeForest Kelley, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

DeForest Kelley, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2017-10-08 17:49:41

Tagged: , DeForest Kelley , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , hat , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll

William Shatner, Kermit Murdock, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

William Shatner, Kermit Murdock, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2017-10-08 17:49:44

Tagged: , William Shatner , Star Trek , Kermit Murdock , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , hat , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll

William Shatner, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

William Shatner, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2017-10-08 17:49:47

Tagged: , William Shatner , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , hat , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll

Kermit Murdock, William Shatner, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Kermit Murdock, William Shatner, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2017-10-08 17:49:42

Tagged: , William Shatner , Star Trek , Kermit Murdock , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgia , nostalgic , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , hat , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll

A Machine Was Invented out of the Dust and Dirt

A Machine Was Invented out of the Dust and Dirt

www.imagekind.com/A-Machine-Was-Invented-out-of-the-Dust-… link to my website…

This is a drawing done in simple manically pencil, a red colored pencil and a china marker + some work with elements 8 after scanning it to my computer. it ended up with a bit of impurity and shading and such that I kept in. I really started to like its impurity, I think it gives it a old photographic look and or movie look. something old and decayed . A elegantly 1920s skull is fitted fashionably with a Top-hat, the skull is also fitted with electronics and a Rocket Engine. the skull fly’s foreword shooting out its eyeball , below its hand fly’s with it flying and shooting.I also tried to incorporate a elegance in the skull flying machine.

Posted by Followthedon on 2011-01-13 22:14:15

Tagged: , 1920s , black , burning , computer , creation , decayed , destruction , dirt , drawing , dust , electronics , energy , eye , fineart , fingers , FollowTheDon , gothic , hands , hat , IMPURITY , invented , machine , melting , photographic , power , red , rocket , scanning , ship , skull , space , steam , surreal , surrealism , teeth , top , white , yellow

[083/365] 3rd November

[083/365] 3rd November

The Muppets

By this day I was finally getting some sleep and getting use to the time difference. We went to Disney World for the first time today and oh my I was in heaven, it was so magical! All the characters were there including the great (and handsome) Buzz Lightyear. I wanted to get this backpack which had a button to make the wings pop out but there was no way I was going to have room in my suitcase so I settled for a hat instead, isn’t it groovy? Not sure where I am going to where it but I’ll find a way! I went on Pirates Of The Carribean, and The Haunted Mansion and Thunder Mountain hehe, so basically my favourites! The last time I went it wasn’t there, but there was this little attraction called ‘Mike’s Laughing (something or other)’ and it was so clever and very funny. I was cracking up in stiches. They pick on people in the audience and you have to fill the laughing meter or you can’t get out haha (sounds a little mean now) but it was very cool. That was it really for that day, but it was a very magical day and I couldn’t stop smiling the whole day. I send you pixie dust from my adventure *blows fairy dust at computer screen*.

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Posted by charliebarker on 2011-11-28 17:55:36

Tagged: , Disney , World , Florida , Orlando , Holiday , Vacation , The , Muppets , Charlie , P , Barker , Nikon , D3100 , November , 2011 , Project , 365 , Girl , Woman , Shorts , Hat , Phineas , Ferb , Perry

Bad Dommie!

Bad Dommie!

Working on a freelance assignment and protected against the sun as much as possible, with Dommie sitting beyond. He had just tried to get on my lap (and the laptop) and I had to turn the computer over to get as much dust out of the keyboard as possible.

Posted by shimmertje on 2009-12-07 19:01:56

Tagged: , Buwah , Oman , me , veil , pink , hat , laptop , netbook , camp , chair , Dommie , Domino , tuxedo , cat , hijab , niqab , flower of Islam