Talking About Y Generation

Talking About Y Generation

Generation Y is the group of young people from 18-25 years old.  In a recent Australian survey, it was revealed that a third of them will start their own business sometime in their lives. This is driven by a determination to have financial security at an early age and be in control of the world around them.  It’s likely that this trend is occurring in most other developed countries around the world. 

 

How times have changed.  When I was in that age bracket 20 years ago this percentage wouldn’t have been nearly as high.  In those days, scoring the job at the large Fortune 500 Company was the status symbol of success and owning your own business was viewed as something reserved solely for the brave entrepreneurs among us.  Nowadays, business options are many and varied so the statistic is perhaps not really surprising. 

 

The company who conducted the research stated that Gen Y were happy to shun a career working for someone else and make their own way in the world.  Unlike Generation X immediately before them, they are happy to do direct selling and have a positive view of franchising.  The generational group portrait indicates that they have an increased sense of entitlement that leads to their desire for a better work/life balance, ambition and increased entrepreneurial activity.

 

So, what has inspired the change?  One factor is that they are growing up on the back of a global financial crisis.  They’re well versed in working with uncertainty and networking with other people.  They’ve seen people around them forced out of their employment and having to reinvent themselves as independent contractors, freelancers, consultants and entrepreneurs.  The result is that they view self-employment as a way of achieving personal and professional success.

 

The major influence in this changing trend though is undoubtedly technology and especially the evolution of the internet.  Their mentality of Gen Y is shaped by people like Richard Branson, Bill Gates and online success stories such as Google, YouTube and Facebook.  They’ve realised that with technology, you can start creating wealth with basic skills, little money and a positive attitude.  As a result, the level of interest this age group has in being self-employed is higher than ever before. 

 

Previous generations used products such as Avon, Amway and Tupperware to create their own home business.  Young people today are still selling these products but instead of the catalogue arriving under your door you will find it in your email inbox or social networking website.  Direct selling companies have even changed some of their product lines because they recognise an increasingly younger sales force selling to younger clientele.

 

Annually, these companies sell about $ 1.6 billion worth of products in Australia and have experienced a 12.5% sales rise in the past three years.  This boom has been largely attributed to online sales in the under-25 age group.  Quality products are obviously important but it’s the use of technology that has really driven this increase.  The internet has been employed not only for advertising and sales but also gathering new clients.  It’s a shop window that is always open.

 

While the proportion of Gen Y entrepreneurs is relatively high, the survey revealed the average across all age groups was less than 5%.  This is an interesting statistic, born largely out of the mindset that we grew up with.  Apart from growing up in an era of social media and online networking, the difference is that Gen Y has recognised the ease of beginning a new business nowadays.  They understand it doesn’t require a large financial commitment, the inherent risks are low and potential returns are high.  Often a business is developed from a simple hobby they had at school or university.   

 

As the world changes, so we can change with it.  We can learn from Gen Y and what they are doing.  There is nothing to stop anyone, regardless of their age, taking a leaf out of their book and having the same success.  Young entrepreneurs today are generally educated and experienced in some form of employment but that’s not the reason for their business achievements.  More often than not it happens through other attributes such as initiative, attitude and resourcefulness. 

 

These are qualities that people of all ages are blessed with…all we need to do is mix it with an open mind and some youthful optimism.

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Lakshmi from Tamil Nadu

Lakshmi from Tamil Nadu

(c) Mayur Paul/HelpAge International December 2009

68 year old Lakshmi makes incense sticks at a older people’s village run by HelpAge India.

“Before I came to the older people’s village, TEV, set up by HelpAge India, my husband was not doing well. First he was hospitalised and then he passed away. I was in a bad condition after that and had suffered with my husband. An older woman from the my local Elders Self Help Group told me to inform the group about my condition during a group meeting. When I told the group about my situation they recommended me for admission to the TEV (an older people’s village supported by HelpAge India).

Incense stick making at TEV
I am now a member of the self help group here at TEV. As a member of the self help group, I am on the food committee and do work in the kitchen. I help the older people who are dependant on care. Also, I help in making these ‘computer sambrianis’."

Sambriani is an incense stick and in the local market everything that is man made gets the prefix ‘computer’.

"I learnt how to make these sticks here at the TEV. First we take the sambriani powder then purchase the plant that is used to make these sticks. We grind it to make it a paste and then add saw dust and water. Then we force the paste through the mould to make these stcks.

It is good work and helps me pass time. About 7 of us make some 100 boxes a month. From this we make a profit of Rs 150 each. One box has 24 incense sticks and sells for Rs 20 each.”

Posted by www.helpage.org on 2010-05-06 16:58:25

Tagged: , Lakshmi , India , Asia , older , people , elderly , smile , teeth , incense , sticks , 2009 , Mayur , Paul , HelpAge , income , generation , money , poor , village , english

Lakshmi from Tamil Nadu

Lakshmi from Tamil Nadu

(c) Mayur Paul/HelpAge International December 2009

68 year old Lakshmi makes incense sticks at a older people’s village run by HelpAge India.

“Before I came to the older people’s village, TEV, set up by HelpAge India, my husband was not doing well. First he was hospitalised and then he passed away. I was in a bad condition after that and had suffered with my husband. An older woman from the my local Elders Self Help Group told me to inform the group about my condition during a group meeting. When I told the group about my situation they recommended me for admission to the TEV (an older people’s village supported by HelpAge India).

Incense stick making at TEV
I am now a member of the self help group here at TEV. As a member of the self help group, I am on the food committee and do work in the kitchen. I help the older people who are dependant on care. Also, I help in making these ‘computer sambrianis’."

Sambriani is an incense stick and in the local market everything that is man made gets the prefix ‘computer’.

"I learnt how to make these sticks here at the TEV. First we take the sambriani powder then purchase the plant that is used to make these sticks. We grind it to make it a paste and then add saw dust and water. Then we force the paste through the mould to make these stcks.

It is good work and helps me pass time. About 7 of us make some 100 boxes a month. From this we make a profit of Rs 150 each. One box has 24 incense sticks and sells for Rs 20 each.”

Posted by www.helpage.org on 2010-05-06 16:58:22

Tagged: , Lakshmi , India , Asia , older , people , elderly , smile , teeth , incense , sticks , 2009 , Mayur , Paul , HelpAge , income , generation , money , poor , village , english

Lakshmi from Tamil Nadu

Lakshmi from Tamil Nadu

(c) Mayur Paul/HelpAge International December 2009

68 year old Lakshmi makes incense sticks at a older people’s village run by HelpAge India.

“Before I came to the older people’s village, TEV, set up by HelpAge India, my husband was not doing well. First he was hospitalised and then he passed away. I was in a bad condition after that and had suffered with my husband. An older woman from the my local Elders Self Help Group told me to inform the group about my condition during a group meeting. When I told the group about my situation they recommended me for admission to the TEV (an older people’s village supported by HelpAge India).

Incense stick making at the older people’s village (TEV)
I am now a member of the self help group here at TEV. As a member of the self help group, I am on the food committee and do work in the kitchen. I help the older people who are dependant on care. Also, I help in making these ‘computer sambrianis’."

Sambriani is an incense stick and in the local market everything that is man made gets the prefix ‘computer’.

"I learnt how to make these sticks here at the TEV. First we take the sambriani powder then purchase the plant that is used to make these sticks. We grind it to make it a paste and then add saw dust and water. Then we force the paste through the mould to make these stcks.

It is good work and helps me pass time. About 7 of us make some 100 boxes a month. From this we make a profit of Rs 150 each. One box has 24 incense sticks and sells for Rs 20 each.”

Posted by www.helpage.org on 2010-05-06 16:58:08

Tagged: , Lakshmi , India , Asia , older , people , elderly , smile , teeth , incense , sticks , 2009 , Mayur , Paul , HelpAge , income , generation , money , poor , village , english

Lakshmi from Tamil Nadu

Lakshmi from Tamil Nadu

© Mayur Paul/HelpAge International December 2009

68 year old Lakshmi makes incense sticks at a older people’s village run by HelpAge India.

“Before I came to the older people’s village, TEV, set up by HelpAge India, my husband was not doing well. First he was hospitalised and then he passed away. I was in a bad condition after that and had suffered with my husband. An older woman from the my local Elders Self Help Group told me to inform the group about my condition during a group meeting. When I told the group about my situation they recommended me for admission to the TEV (an older people’s village supported by HelpAge India).

Incense stick making at TEV
I am now a member of the self help group here at TEV. As a member of the self help group, I am on the food committee and do work in the kitchen. I help the older people who are dependant on care. Also, I help in making these ‘computer sambrianis’."

Sambriani is an incense stick and in the local market everything that is man made gets the prefix ‘computer’.

"I learnt how to make these sticks here at the TEV. First we take the sambriani powder then purchase the plant that is used to make these sticks. We grind it to make it a paste and then add saw dust and water. Then we force the paste through the mould to make these stcks.

It is good work and helps me pass time. About 7 of us make some 100 boxes a month. From this we make a profit of Rs 150 each. One box has 24 incense sticks and sells for Rs 20 each.”

Posted by www.helpage.org on 2010-05-06 16:58:28

Tagged: , Lakshmi , India , Asia , older , people , elderly , smile , teeth , incense , sticks , 2009 , Mayur , Paul , HelpAge , income , generation , money , poor , village , english

Lakshmi from Tamil Nadu

Lakshmi from Tamil Nadu

(c) Mayur Paul/HelpAge International December 2009

68 year old Lakshmi makes incense sticks at a older people’s village run by HelpAge India.

“Before I came to the older people’s village, TEV, set up by HelpAge India, my husband was not doing well. First he was hospitalised and then he passed away. I was in a bad condition after that and had suffered with my husband. An older woman from the my local Elders Self Help Group told me to inform the group about my condition during a group meeting. When I told the group about my situation they recommended me for admission to the TEV (an older people’s village supported by HelpAge India).

Incense stick making at TEV
I am now a member of the self help group here at TEV. As a member of the self help group, I am on the food committee and do work in the kitchen. I help the older people who are dependant on care. Also, I help in making these ‘computer sambrianis’."

Sambriani is an incense stick and in the local market everything that is man made gets the prefix ‘computer’.

"I learnt how to make these sticks here at the TEV. First we take the sambriani powder then purchase the plant that is used to make these sticks. We grind it to make it a paste and then add saw dust and water. Then we force the paste through the mould to make these stcks.

It is good work and helps me pass time. About 7 of us make some 100 boxes a month. From this we make a profit of Rs 150 each. One box has 24 incense sticks and sells for Rs 20 each.”

Posted by www.helpage.org on 2010-05-06 16:58:40

Tagged: , Lakshmi , India , Asia , older , people , elderly , smile , teeth , incense , sticks , 2009 , Mayur , Paul , HelpAge , income , generation , money , poor , village , english

Lakshmi from Tamil Nadu

Lakshmi from Tamil Nadu

(c) Mayur Paul/HelpAge International December 2009

68 year old Lakshmi makes incense sticks at a older people’s village run by HelpAge India.

“Before I came to the older people’s village, TEV, set up by HelpAge India, my husband was not doing well. First he was hospitalised and then he passed away. I was in a bad condition after that and had suffered with my husband. An older woman from the my local Elders Self Help Group told me to inform the group about my condition during a group meeting. When I told the group about my situation they recommended me for admission to the TEV (an older people’s village supported by HelpAge India).

Incense stick making at TEV
I am now a member of the self help group here at TEV. As a member of the self help group, I am on the food committee and do work in the kitchen. I help the older people who are dependant on care. Also, I help in making these ‘computer sambrianis’."

Sambriani is an incense stick and in the local market everything that is man made gets the prefix ‘computer’.

"I learnt how to make these sticks here at the TEV. First we take the sambriani powder then purchase the plant that is used to make these sticks. We grind it to make it a paste and then add saw dust and water. Then we force the paste through the mould to make these stcks.

It is good work and helps me pass time. About 7 of us make some 100 boxes a month. From this we make a profit of Rs 150 each. One box has 24 incense sticks and sells for Rs 20 each.”

68 year old Lakshmi makes incense sticks at a older people’s village run by HelpAge India.

Posted by www.helpage.org on 2010-05-06 16:58:34

Tagged: , Lakshmi , India , Asia , older , people , elderly , smile , teeth , incense , sticks , 2009 , Mayur , Paul , HelpAge , income , generation , money , poor , village , english

Lakshmi from Tamil Nadu

Lakshmi from Tamil Nadu

(c) Mayur Paul/HelpAge International December 2009

68 year old Lakshmi makes incense sticks at a older people’s village run by HelpAge India.

“Before I came to the older people’s village, TEV, set up by HelpAge India, my husband was not doing well. First he was hospitalised and then he passed away. I was in a bad condition after that and had suffered with my husband. An older woman from the my local Elders Self Help Group told me to inform the group about my condition during a group meeting. When I told the group about my situation they recommended me for admission to the TEV (an older people’s village supported by HelpAge India).

Incense stick making at TEV
I am now a member of the self help group here at TEV. As a member of the self help group, I am on the food committee and do work in the kitchen. I help the older people who are dependant on care. Also, I help in making these ‘computer sambrianis’."

Sambriani is an incense stick and in the local market everything that is man made gets the prefix ‘computer’.

"I learnt how to make these sticks here at the TEV. First we take the sambriani powder then purchase the plant that is used to make these sticks. We grind it to make it a paste and then add saw dust and water. Then we force the paste through the mould to make these stcks.

It is good work and helps me pass time. About 7 of us make some 100 boxes a month. From this we make a profit of Rs 150 each. One box has 24 incense sticks and sells for Rs 20 each.”

Posted by www.helpage.org on 2010-05-06 16:58:15

Tagged: , Lakshmi , India , Asia , older , people , elderly , smile , teeth , incense , sticks , 2009 , Mayur , Paul , HelpAge , income , generation , money , poor , village , english

Urban Street Wear: The Fashion Of Next Generation At A Glance

Urban Street Wear: The Fashion Of Next Generation At A Glance
The Street wear, sometimes called street fashion is the way to equip the followers of culture hip-hop. It consists of specific elements that each has their own meaning, having a history linked to the culture around. May well see such large clothing (baggy pants and T-shirts XXL), more suitable to the practice of b-boy. Sports shoes, sport shoes, are in the same way, an essential element in the panoply of B-boy. The life of the bands of criminals also influenced street wear: The bandana is sometimes taken as well. The absence of cords or belts (reason for which the pants are below) is due to the method of life in prison, where every object at the risk of encouraging suicide was confiscated

In 1976 in southern California (USA) remained unchanged skateboarding ended forever shaped the sport and culture. By then arises Vision Street Wear, a different brand that quickly understood the natural connection between music and skate culture.. In the championships organized (titled “Vision Skate Escape”) played live by a previously unknown group called Red Hot Chill Peppers … And in the ranks of professional skaters included big names like Mark “Gator” Rogowski, Steve Rocco , Marty ” Jinx “Jimenez, and Mark Gonzales . By the early 90’s the influence of his aesthetic and philosophy began to decline due to the changes it went skateboarding in that decade.

Today, Vision Street Wear (also known as VSW) is a textile company whose license is maintained by the company Collective Licensing International and is dedicated to sell shoes, skate boards and different accessories and retro-flavoured “vintage.” Hip-hop fashion is a distinctive style of dress originating with African-American youth on the scene of New York, Los Angeles, Orland, Chicago, Philadelphia, the San Francisco Bay Area, Detroit, Memphis, Atlanta, Jersey City and Miami among others. Each city contributed various elements to its overall style seen worldwide today. Hip hop fashion complements the expressions and attitudes of hip hop culture in general. Hip hop fashion has changed significantly during its history, and today, it is a prominent part of popular fashion as a whole across the world and for all ethnicities.

On the East Coast, members of the hip hop community looked back to the gangsters of the 1930s and 1940s for inspiration. Mafioso influences, especially and primarily inspired by the 1983 remake version of Scar face, became popular in hip hop. Many rappers set aside gang-inspired clothing in favour of classic gangster fashions such as bowler hats, double-breasted suits, silk shirts, and alligator-skin shoes (“gators”).One sportswear trend that emerged was the rise in popularity of throwback jerseys, such as those produced by Mitchell & Ness. Sports jerseys have always been popular in hip-hop fashion; the hip hop fashion trends of the 2000s were all over the place and changed constantly. During these years there was a heavy celebrity influence among fashion trends.

Hip Hop artists made brands like Gucci and Louis Vinton popular amongst the hip hop community, where most initially used hip hop as a way to a better life. Throughout these years many fashion trends from the 80’s and early 90’s were made popular again, when we see the rebirth of the door knocker earring and form fitting jeans for males. Come back the year end and it is the time to party and celebrate. The first factor that comes to your brains is how better to handle your war drove to create yourself the most effective and engaging at the joyful night. Winter has set in thus you need to put on something to form yourself heat and cosy however surely style would be the objective as well

The one other type of clothing is called MMA clothing. Mixed Martial Arts (English Mixed martial arts – MMA), is a combat sport that allows a wide variety of techniques and fighting skills in various martial arts and contact sports.
Championship event and is now considered the fastest growing sport in terms of popularity in countries like United States, Brazil and Japan. so for this reason special kind of clothing was developed called MMA clothing.

The street used, jean, cotton hooded jumper, sweat shirts, jackets, Puller of fleece, half zip shirts, shirts, full zip, T-shirts, Pants ,Rain jacket and Street shorts., Covered in the versatility of colours like black, gray, white or khaki, developed designs focused on the everyday look, flagged urban look, sexy and glamorous. A natural and sophisticated style closely linked to the street style that has evolved since the eighties trends of his first creations, influenced by hip-hop and exaggerated bomber the b-boys, to his approach to other fads like punk, glam rock and even the neo-gothic. An approach to urban tribes as embodied in the use of leather, military boots, cowboy clothes or bags in black with colourful zippers.

For more information aboutUrban Outfits,Street Wear and MMA Clothing ,please visit:ragewear-clothing.com

How Generation Y Will Evolve Leadership

How Generation Y Will Evolve Leadership

Generation X (1965-1980) and Generation Y (1981-1999) have different values and needs than the current dominant baby boom leaders. The current war for talent will have to dip into the new generation for leadership as the boomers retire. The new Generation Y leaders have the most potential to change the nature of leadership in organizations.

In 1960 one out of eleven Americans were 65 or older. In 2008 it is one out of seven. In 2030 it will be one out of five. Current government pension plans, medical plans and other seniors type of structures have the potential to create a crushing tax burden on young people for the next few decades. We are on the edge of a huge income transfer from young workers to older retirees.

The 2006 Cone Millennial Case Study concluded the following attitudes of Gen Yers:

*79% want to work for a company that cares about and contributes to society.

*78% believe companies have a responsibility for making a difference in the world.

*76% would refuse to work for an irresponsible company.

The vast majority of Gen Y entering the workforce today are knowledge workers. They often have more knowledge and skill sets than their baby boomer managers, and are less likely to tolerate a command-and-control traditional leadership style.

Gen Y workers want to learn, to be challenged, have access to the latest information and technology. And they want to be apart of a n organization that respects them for their knowledge and ideas. Gen Y will change traditional views of career management. In the old model, people put in their time, paid their dues, worked hard and were promoted and compensated. That pattern no longer exists. It is estimated that the typical Gen Y knowledge worker will have 10-14 jobs by the time they retire, if they do retire.

The annual performance appraisal will not sit well with Gen Y workers. They want more input and feedback, and honest appraisal along with intelligent advice from respected leaders and mentors. Gen Y workers don’t want just financial compensation; they want a piece of the action, a piece of the company.

Generation Y sees work and leadership very differently than the baby boomers in the following ways:

*They care about work that is meaningful to their self development.

*Career advancement based on performance, and challenge.

*They abhor traditional one-way top down communication.

*They expect communication to be constant, two way and flexible.

*Traditional training, and performance reviews are not favored.

*They have different lifestyle demands.

*They need a sense of community and belonging.

*They want a commitment to social responsibility, sustainability,and treating employees as good or better than customers.

*They want flexible and restructured work environments.

*They prefer social networking to be integrated into work.

*They want a balanced life, not a workaholic life.

*They want mentors.

*They know how to and expect to use the latest technology.

*They expect the company to be devoted to good deeds in the community.

We are about to witness in the next few years a radical shift in values and workplace culture led by Generation Y.

Ray Williams is Co-Founder of Success IQ University, a company based in Phoenix Arizona, providing products and services for professionals, entrepreneurs, companies in the area of personal growth and leadership development, through an innovative approach to improve your success IQ. Ray is also President of Ray Williams Associates, a company providing executive coaching services in Vancouver, Canada. http://www.successiqu.com