Hildda Season Greetings

Hildda Season Greetings

Hello Everyone and happy Wednesday, it is the middle of the week and only two more till the weekend, Yay! I still have a load of things to do and some shopping for gifts, then I am done! Finally as promised in my 1000 Followers photo, Mary finally finished editing the interview she did with me and as promised here it is, some questions and answers were removed, because in hindsight I was not comfortable sharing that part of me, I forgot I was doing an interview and was just talking to my friends I have known for years. Hopefully I left in enough to not be a disappointment. I am so thankful for all of you and for your kind comments and encouraging words and I do wish all of you an incredible and lovely Holiday season. ­čÖé

xoxo,
Hillda

Mary: You know I am going to get you to confess where you have hidden the bodies and the bank jewels!

Hildda: Laughs, only after enough glasses of wine and then maybe.

Mary: LOL! Ok here we go, question one!

Q: How long have you been in Second Life and what brought you in?

Hildda: Boring! Laughs, I thought you were going to start with ÔÇťWhy do I dress like a pony girl every weekend!ÔÇŁ

Mary: LOL, that is for later on!

Hildda: Oh! Laughs, ok then. I came into Second Life in 2013, after a nasty real life breakup, a friend at my office told me about this online place called Second Life and that it would be a good distraction and be able to meet people safely. So I created an account that weekend and came in-world and been am citizen ever since. My first few weeks were difficult to say the least, more from not knowing how to use the viewer and go places, or what even a place was. Also was having issues with very strange people, however, in time I was meeting people that were smart and sweet, the discovery of shopping made this crazy place enjoyable and worthwhile to stay, as a result the addiction to Second Life began to grow. ­čÖé

Q: What is about Second Life you love the most?

Hildda: My Second Life family and friends, who have become real life family and friends to me and help me bury the bodies when I need help! When I can text my SL sister as much as my RL sister, or go on Skype IM with my bubsie that says something about how powerful this world really is, I never had that swipping profiles and pics on my phone to find a date.

Q: What is your favorite things to do in Second Life?

Hildda: You know me, I am actually a very boring, I just love being around people, though over the years, I have come to love going to live music performances, my favorite being Maximillion Kleene, He has a wonderful voice and he always brings a smile to my face. I also go to Art Galleries and Museums and I do what BubsieÔÇÖs taught me, is sim jumping to discover what is new, or something I have never seen before.. then of course there is the photography and modeling and yes I am a shopoholic.

Q: Have you ever done the Role Play scenes in Second Life?

Hildda: I tried it, but I am not very good at role playing, pretending to be someone else in a fantasy setting was interesting but just was not for me. I do enjoy going to places that have things to do as yourself, a murder mystery sim, or a family community town, things like that, but playing grendella the wicked queen of Hysteria in an elven land, really is not for me.

Mary: Then what about the Pony Girl weekends, LOL!

Hildda: Shut up you cow, you know I do not do those things! Laughs.

Q: You do not have to answer this, but have you ever had a relationship in Second Life and are you single now?

Hildda: Yes I had one, it was nice but in the end it was just more of a friendship than anything else. Yes I am single in SL and RL, but not looking, not opposed. You better not be trying to set me up!

Q: No promises, because I did meet this Dubai Prince at a club the other day and he is into red heads and says he is loadedÔÇŽ

Hildda: NOOOO!!!!! Laughs!

Q: LOL, ok, we will put a thumb tack in that for later, moving on, what made you start doing fashion photos in Second Life?

Hildda: I started taking photos when I first entered into Second Life, doing quick snapshots of me and friends, not knowing what I was doing or anything about SL photography. What really grabbed my attention was I started seeing the advertisement photos in the shops around Second life, especially at the time in the Gizza store, who would put up these amazing high fashion posters for her clothes and I would just stare at them reminded of the photos that are in my Vogue and Bazaar magazines. Then it struck me, I can try to do that, so started to learn all I could about Second Life photography and annoyed my brother to start teaching me how to use PhotoShop and Darktable. When I eventually took a photo and went, wow, that is really beautiful, I was hooked.

Q: Why did you start sharing your photos on Flickr?

Hildda: Because all of you people would not stop nagging me to death about it, laughs! You know me I am actually very shy and actually was afraid to share, you all giving that encouragement helped me overcome that fear and I started early this uploading and I am surprised at the response I have received from others and am just thankful.

Q: How do you describe your fashion style?

Hildda: Cosmopolitan Eclectic would be the best description I believe, I love wearing pieces that I really enjoy and are of high quality, mixing different designers up together to create something that is me. I am a city girl and I suppose I bring that sense of fashion into my Second Life appearance.

Q: What is your favorite look to strut around in Second Life?

Hildda: You make me sound like a pretentious cat, laughs. I suppose if I had to say what I wear most often is either a nice dress, or a pair of leather trousers, maybe jeans and a sweater. I change my outfits so often but those are my go too looks, that I will wear several times a week.

Q: Who is your favorite Second Life designer?

Hildda: That is SOOOO hard to answer, there are many that are just amazing, plus there are always new designers that keep setting the bar for quality and creativity higher and higher. If I had to choose though, I have several designers I adore, gasping with excitement, bouncing in my seat when I see a new release. I would have to say I have a five way tie between Valentina E., Osmia, Dead Dollz, Ricelli, Tetra and United Colors! Oh there are just so many incredible designers, it is impossible to select even a few, you are making me feel like I am at the Oscars trying to thank everyone that worked on the film, afraid of missing just one, laughs!

Q: Ok, I will ask an easy question for you, Who is your favorite real life designer?

Hildda: I am a Valentino girl! Though I never limit myself to just one designer, a true woman will have select pieces in her closet that best speaks of her and how she feels that day, or how she wants to feel that day, she expresses herself to others by her outfit, ÔÇťI am feeling like this todayÔÇÖ.

Q: Shoes and boots and who is your favorite?

Hildda: I adore wearing tall boots with either a dress, or over leggings. Again there are way to many designers to be able to choose only one favorite, I am an absolute fan of Reign, Utopia and Eudora3d.

Q: One word to ask, Hair?

Hildda: Ughs, I have way too many hairs in my closet nd way too many exceptional hair stores around. Doux, Monso, Exile and Truth in Red of course! The beauty of Second Life is I can change from long hair to short hair on a whim, I cannot do that in second life unless I wear wigs all the time.

Q: I know you have your two places in Second Life, who are your favorite non fashion designers, or creators?

Hildda; OH! That is impossible to answer, there are so many, MANY amazing artists that create objects that make my mouth gape open and enable one to create a beautiful home, or create a great photo scene. I will say Dust Bunny, Nutmeg, Fancy Decor, Botanical, Apple Fall, Half Deer, I pretty much have most of their stores in my inventory. Laughs! I do enjoy shopping at so many other places as well, I wish I could give them all a Like!

Q: A SL and RL fashion question, what three pieces should be in every womanÔÇÖs closet?

Hildda: Good question, for real life, every woman is going to have her favorite go to pair of jeans, shoes and her favorite bag. I would say that pieces that can used for anytime and almost any occasion is ideal. So, a white silk blouse, or sweater, do not let the so called fashion law of no white after labor day fool you, you can where white anytime you like! Then a nice quality knee length real leather skirt, in black, a leather skirt can transform from the office to a night on the town with just a simple change of accessories, I am not against the pleather skirts and leggings I have a few myself, but have found that the more you wear them, the more the pleather stretches and the piece does not fit right after awhile, where leather always has bounced back for me. So worth the investment. ­čÖé Then I would say a nice elegant calve length coat, simple with clean lines, again a coat that can move from the office to evening with no effort. The coat does not have to be fancy or expensive, but a nice black, or taupe expresses elegance.

Q: Going back to Second Life modeling and photography, what advice would you give to those who would wish to start doing modeling and photography?

Hildda: Well first of all I do not believe I am anywhere close to being qualified to give advice on this as I am still learning myself everyday. What I can say that may help those who are starting is, take photos you want to see and enjoy viewing, not what you think others will want to see. Unless, you are a photographer for an SL magazine, or doing advertising for a store, the picture you are doing is for you and if others like what you did that gives you a very deep warm feeling of appreciation down deep in yourself, where as if one took a photo for others and they do not like it, then the opposite feeling of rejection happens and it makes one feel terrible on the inside. So always be yourself and do the photo for yourself and then share with others, because we should always share and give.

Second, Also learn PhotoShop, my brother helped me get started with it, he is into computers and built for me what I needed, so instead of my laptop, I am using this huge refrigerator of a computer in my living room, laughs. I also eventually took a class in PhotoShop to learn more on layering and masking and all that stuff. The software is not expensive through the Adobe cloud and is well worth the investment in my opinion.

Third, never be afraid of making a mistake, making mistakes is a good thing, when you learn from them, I know that goes against what I learned in school, we were always punished for making mistakes, but I have found I learn more from trying and failing rather than always succeeding and never growing. Yes, I have taken photos that were absolutely awful and deleted them they were that bad, laughs, but I learned and knew how to not do something, or something for another time.

and then I would say, never be afraid to push your boundaries and try new things even when they are a bit outside your comfort level, that is the only way to grow and have fun, else you will become bored.

Q: On Flickr, do you have any favorite artists?

Hildda: Why the questions that will get me into trouble, you are such a bitch Mary! Laughs. There are so many and what is amazing is that each have their own style, their own voice and expression, I never dare and it would be wrong to compare this model and artist with that one over there and so on. There are a few that stand out in my mind as breathtakingly incredible and I would love to mention them, but then I think it would be unfair to those who are amazing in their own rights, like me I am still learning and may never reach the level of creativity and skill that some of these have in their photos. However that does not matter at all, we do what we do out of a love for Second Life and for the creativity. Even if someone posts a picture of a blank wall with a single red stripe down the center, if that work touches them and came from their heart, then it is beautiful in my mind. ­čÖé
I am just humbled and grateful that there are those who visit and enjoy my little corner of Flickr that I am happy to share with.

Q: So Hildda to wrap up this little Q&A for your fans, I have one final question…what is your age?

Hildda: Smacks her and takes away her wine!

Q: In all seriousness, anything for the inspiring photographer, or model before we end.

Hildda: Always believe in yourself and be grateful for everything, never be afraid to take risks and never be afraid of failing, you just brush yourself off and keep doing what you love. There is never anything that is perfect in modeling, or photography, no grand rule book, you are expressing yourself and you are special and unique, so if wearing a tattered sweater and decade old comfy jeans makes you feel good and you want to take a photo, then do so and let the world take care of itself! ­čÖé

A big thank you to Mary for giving and editing this Q&A, love you Drunkie! laughs

Posted by Hildda.Deveaue on 2019-12-12 01:10:20

Tagged: , Second Life , Holiday , Greetings , Merry Christmas , Model , Pose , Santa Suit , Sexy Santa , Erotic Mrs. Claus , Xmas Tree , fireplace , Christmas Tree , santa hat , makeup , fashion

Mariette Hartley, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Mariette Hartley, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Image shared here only for non-profit commentary, critique, criticism, discussion, research, news reporting, education / information, research, teaching, and/or parody purposes per the provisions and guidelines of the U.S. Fair Use doctrine, pursuant to Title 17 U.S. Code ┬ž 107 regarding use of copyright material. Not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2019-11-27 10:28:36

Tagged: , Mariette Hartley , Star Trek , television , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , actress , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , ni├▒a bonita , nostalgic , nostalgia , h├╝bsches M├Ądchen , h├╝bsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , celebrity , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , American , USA , a├▒ejo , ├ępoca , cl├ísico , hair , hair style , fashion , Hollywood , atriz , ephemeral , woman , girl , sch├Ân , old , lady , jahrgang , alt , oll

Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Image shared here only for non-profit commentary, critique, criticism, discussion, research, news reporting, education / information, research, teaching, and/or parody purposes per the provisions and guidelines of the U.S. Fair Use doctrine, pursuant to Title 17 U.S. Code ┬ž 107 regarding use of copyright material. Not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2019-11-27 10:28:34

Tagged: , Leonard Nimoy , DeForest Kelley , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , a├▒ejo , ├ępoca , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , cl├ísico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll

Ian Wolfe, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Ian Wolfe, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Image shared here only for non-profit commentary, critique, criticism, discussion, research, news reporting, education / information, research, teaching, and/or parody purposes per the provisions and guidelines of the U.S. Fair Use doctrine, pursuant to Title 17 U.S. Code ┬ž 107 regarding use of copyright material. Not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2019-11-27 10:28:37

Tagged: , Star Trek , Ian Wolfe , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , a├▒ejo , ├ępoca , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , cl├ísico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll

William Shatner, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

William Shatner, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Image shared here only for non-profit commentary, critique, criticism, discussion, research, news reporting, education / information, research, teaching, and/or parody purposes per the provisions and guidelines of the U.S. Fair Use doctrine, pursuant to Title 17 U.S. Code ┬ž 107 regarding use of copyright material. Not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2019-11-27 10:28:35

Tagged: , William Shatner , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , a├▒ejo , ├ępoca , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , cl├ísico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll

Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Image shared here only for non-profit commentary, critique, criticism, discussion, research, news reporting, education / information, research, teaching, and/or parody purposes per the provisions and guidelines of the U.S. Fair Use doctrine, pursuant to Title 17 U.S. Code ┬ž 107 regarding use of copyright material. Not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2019-11-27 10:28:33

Tagged: , Leonard Nimoy , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , a├▒ejo , ├ępoca , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , cl├ísico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll

Mariette Hartley, Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Mariette Hartley, Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Image shared here only for non-profit commentary, critique, criticism, discussion, research, news reporting, education / information, research, teaching, and/or parody purposes per the provisions and guidelines of the U.S. Fair Use doctrine, pursuant to Title 17 U.S. Code ┬ž 107 regarding use of copyright material. Not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2019-11-27 10:28:34

Tagged: , Leonard Nimoy , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , a├▒ejo , ├ępoca , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , cl├ísico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll , Mariette Hartley , actress , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , ni├▒a bonita , h├╝bsches M├Ądchen , h├╝bsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , hair , hair style , atriz , woman , girl , sch├Ân , lady

Leonard Nimoy, Mariette Hartley, DeForest Kelley, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Leonard Nimoy, Mariette Hartley, DeForest Kelley, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Image shared here only for non-profit commentary, critique, criticism, discussion, research, news reporting, education / information, research, teaching, and/or parody purposes per the provisions and guidelines of the U.S. Fair Use doctrine, pursuant to Title 17 U.S. Code ┬ž 107 regarding use of copyright material. Not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2019-11-27 10:28:33

Tagged: , Leonard Nimoy , DeForest Kelley , Mariette Hartley , Star Trek , television , actor , actress , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , a├▒ejo , ├ępoca , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , cl├ísico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , ni├▒a bonita , h├╝bsches M├Ądchen , h├╝bsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , hair , hair style , atriz , woman , girl , sch├Ân , lady

Mariette Hartley, Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Mariette Hartley, Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Image shared here only for non-profit commentary, critique, criticism, discussion, research, news reporting, education / information, research, teaching, and/or parody purposes per the provisions and guidelines of the U.S. Fair Use doctrine, pursuant to Title 17 U.S. Code ┬ž 107 regarding use of copyright material. Not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2019-11-27 10:28:36

Tagged: , Leonard Nimoy , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , a├▒ejo , ├ępoca , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , cl├ísico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll , Mariette Hartley , actress , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , ni├▒a bonita , h├╝bsches M├Ądchen , h├╝bsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , hair , hair style , atriz , woman , girl , sch├Ân , lady

William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Ian Wolfe, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

William Shatner, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Ian Wolfe, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Image shared here only for non-profit commentary, critique, criticism, discussion, research, news reporting, education / information, research, teaching, and/or parody purposes per the provisions and guidelines of the U.S. Fair Use doctrine, pursuant to Title 17 U.S. Code ┬ž 107 regarding use of copyright material. Not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2019-11-27 10:28:37

Tagged: , William Shatner , Leonard Nimoy , DeForest Kelley , Star Trek , Ian Wolfe , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , a├▒ejo , ├ępoca , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , cl├ísico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll