Photo added to “All Photos”

Photo added to

purple nebula and cosmic dust in star field

Posted by jonathansialreug on 2018-05-13 14:38:09

Tagged: , IFTTT , iOS , Photos , Backdrop , Astronomy , Textured , Big Bang , Bunch , Heaven , Abstract , Constellation , Milky Way , Planetarium , Dust , Exploding , Computer Graphic , Backgrounds , Infinity , Origins , Futuristic , Exploration , Mystery , Order , Star Shape , Dark , Multi Colored , Purple , Blue , Black Color , Deep , Science , Nature , Night , Light – Natural Phenomenon , Natural Gas , Field , Galaxy , Star – Space , Nebula , Planet – Space , Space , Cloud – Sky , Sun , Sky , Astronomy Telescope , Plasma , Astrology

Personal Computer

Personal Computer

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Posted by www.lekorbo.be on 2017-10-26 08:41:35

Tagged: , Beauties , Derelict , Exploring , Lightroom , Old , Porn , Rusty , a7 , abandonedplaces , alone , alpha , barn , beautiful , beautyindecay , creepy , crown , dark places , decay , deserted , dust , dxo , european , exploration , factory , find , forbidden , forgotten , heavy , house , indus , leKorbo , lieux , light , lost , lostplaces , memories , opticspro , oubliés , passion , place , religious , retro , roadtrip , rooftop , ruins , sonyalpha , strange , theater , urban , manuellens , manualfocus

Apollo Rover 2424gs

Apollo Rover 2424gs

The Lunar Roving Vehicle had a mass of 463 lbs and was designed to hold a payload of an additional 1,080 lbs on the lunar surface. The frame was 10 feet long with a wheelbase of 7.5 feet. The maximum height was 3.75 feet. The frame was made of aluminum alloy 2219 tubing welded assemblies and consisted of a 3 part chassis which was hinged in the center so it could be folded up and hung in the Lunar Module quad 1 bay. It had two side-by-side foldable seats made of tubular aluminum with nylon webbing and aluminum floor panels. An armrest was mounted between the seats, and each seat had adjustable footrests and a velcro seatbelt. A large mesh dish antenna was mounted on a mast on the front center of the rover. The suspension consisted of a double horizontal wishbone with upper and lower torsion bars and a damper unit between the chassis and upper wishbone. Fully loaded the LRV had a ground clearance of 14 inches.

The wheels consisted of a spun aluminum hub and an 32 inches diameter, 9 inch wide tire made of zinc coated woven .033 inch diameter steel strands attached to the rim and discs of formed aluminum. Titanium chevrons covered 50% of the contact area to provide traction. Inside the tire was a 25.5 inch diameter bump stop frame to protect the hub. Dust guards were mounted above the wheels. Each wheel had its own electric drive, a DC series wound 0.25 hp motor capable of 10,000 rpm, attached to the wheel via an 80:1 harmonic drive, and a mechanical brake unit. Maneuvering capability was provided through the use of front and rear steering motors. Each series wound DC steering motor was capable of 0.1 hp. Both sets of wheels would turn in opposite directions, giving a steering radius of 10 feet, or could be decoupled so only one set would be used for steering. They could also free-wheel in case of drive failure. Power was provided by two 36-volt silver-zinc potassium hydroxide non-rechargeable batteries with a capacity of 121 A·h. These were used to power the drive and steering motors and also a 36 volt utility outlet mounted on front of the LRV to power the communications relay unit or the TV camera.

A T-shaped hand controller situated between the two seats controlled the four drive motors, two steering motors and brakes. Moving the stick forward powered the LRV forward, left and right turned the vehicle left or right, pulling backwards activated the brakes. Activating a switch on the handle before pulling back would put the LRV into reverse. Pulling the handle all the way back activated a parking brake. The control and display modules were situated in front of the handle and gave information on the speed, heading, pitch, and power and temperature levels.

Navigation was based on continuously recording direction and distance through use of a directional gyro and odometer and inputting this data to a computer which would keep track of the overall direction and distance back to the LM. There was also a Sun-shadow device which could give a manual heading based on the direction of the Sun, using the fact that the Sun moved very slowly in the sky.

Posted by Quadrofonic Wingnut on 2007-04-03 04:15:01

Tagged: , Cosmosphere , Hutchison , Kansas , NASA , manned , space , exploration , Apollo , Saturn , moon , rover , rocket , museum , history

Apollo Rover 2548g7bs3

Apollo Rover 2548g7bs3

The Apollo Lunar Roving Vehicle was an electric vehicle designed to operate in the low-gravity vacuum of the Moon and to be capable of traversing the lunar surface, allowing the Apollo astronauts to extend the range of their surface extravehicular activities. Three LRVs were driven on the Moon, one on Apollo 15 by astronauts David Scott and Jim Irwin, one on Apollo 16 by John Young and Charles Duke, and one on Apollo 17 by Gene Cernan and Harrison Schmitt.

The Lunar Roving Vehicle had a mass of 463 lbs and was designed to hold a payload of an additional 1,080 lbs on the lunar surface. The frame was 10 feet long with a wheelbase of 7.5 feet. The maximum height was 3.75 feet. The frame was made of aluminum alloy 2219 tubing welded assemblies and consisted of a 3 part chassis which was hinged in the center so it could be folded up and hung in the Lunar Module quad 1 bay. It had two side-by-side foldable seats made of tubular aluminum with nylon webbing and aluminum floor panels. An armrest was mounted between the seats, and each seat had adjustable footrests and a velcro seatbelt. A large mesh dish antenna was mounted on a mast on the front center of the rover. The suspension consisted of a double horizontal wishbone with upper and lower torsion bars and a damper unit between the chassis and upper wishbone. Fully loaded the LRV had a ground clearance of 14 inches.

The wheels consisted of a spun aluminum hub and an 32 inches diameter, 9 inch wide tire made of zinc coated woven .033 inch diameter steel strands attached to the rim and discs of formed aluminum. Titanium chevrons covered 50% of the contact area to provide traction. Inside the tire was a 25.5 inch diameter bump stop frame to protect the hub. Dust guards were mounted above the wheels. Each wheel had its own electric drive, a DC series wound 0.25 hp motor capable of 10,000 rpm, attached to the wheel via an 80:1 harmonic drive, and a mechanical brake unit. Maneuvering capability was provided through the use of front and rear steering motors. Each series wound DC steering motor was capable of 0.1 hp. Both sets of wheels would turn in opposite directions, giving a steering radius of 10 feet, or could be decoupled so only one set would be used for steering. They could also free-wheel in case of drive failure. Power was provided by two 36-volt silver-zinc potassium hydroxide non-rechargeable batteries with a capacity of 121 A·h. These were used to power the drive and steering motors and also a 36 volt utility outlet mounted on front of the LRV to power the communications relay unit or the TV camera.

A T-shaped hand controller situated between the two seats controlled the four drive motors, two steering motors and brakes. Moving the stick forward powered the LRV forward, left and right turned the vehicle left or right, pulling backwards activated the brakes. Activating a switch on the handle before pulling back would put the LRV into reverse. Pulling the handle all the way back activated a parking brake. The control and display modules were situated in front of the handle and gave information on the speed, heading, pitch, and power and temperature levels.

Navigation was based on continuously recording direction and distance through use of a directional gyro and odometer and inputting this data to a computer which would keep track of the overall direction and distance back to the LM. There was also a Sun-shadow device which could give a manual heading based on the direction of the Sun, using the fact that the Sun moved very slowly in the sky.

Posted by Quadrofonic Wingnut on 2007-04-03 04:14:59

Tagged: , Cosmosphere , Hutchison , Kansas , NASA , manned , space , exploration , Apollo , Saturn , moon , rover , rocket , museum , history

Apollo Rover 2550c2gs-b

Apollo Rover 2550c2gs-b

The Lunar Roving Vehicle had a mass of 463 lbs and was designed to hold a payload of an additional 1,080 lbs on the lunar surface. The frame was 10 feet long with a wheelbase of 7.5 feet. The maximum height was 3.75 feet. The frame was made of aluminum alloy 2219 tubing welded assemblies and consisted of a 3 part chassis which was hinged in the center so it could be folded up and hung in the Lunar Module quad 1 bay. It had two side-by-side foldable seats made of tubular aluminum with nylon webbing and aluminum floor panels. An armrest was mounted between the seats, and each seat had adjustable footrests and a velcro seatbelt. A large mesh dish antenna was mounted on a mast on the front center of the rover. The suspension consisted of a double horizontal wishbone with upper and lower torsion bars and a damper unit between the chassis and upper wishbone. Fully loaded the LRV had a ground clearance of 14 inches.

The wheels consisted of a spun aluminum hub and an 32 inches diameter, 9 inch wide tire made of zinc coated woven .033 inch diameter steel strands attached to the rim and discs of formed aluminum. Titanium chevrons covered 50% of the contact area to provide traction. Inside the tire was a 25.5 inch diameter bump stop frame to protect the hub. Dust guards were mounted above the wheels. Each wheel had its own electric drive, a DC series wound 0.25 hp motor capable of 10,000 rpm, attached to the wheel via an 80:1 harmonic drive, and a mechanical brake unit. Maneuvering capability was provided through the use of front and rear steering motors. Each series wound DC steering motor was capable of 0.1 hp. Both sets of wheels would turn in opposite directions, giving a steering radius of 10 feet, or could be decoupled so only one set would be used for steering. They could also free-wheel in case of drive failure. Power was provided by two 36-volt silver-zinc potassium hydroxide non-rechargeable batteries with a capacity of 121 A·h. These were used to power the drive and steering motors and also a 36 volt utility outlet mounted on front of the LRV to power the communications relay unit or the TV camera.

A T-shaped hand controller situated between the two seats controlled the four drive motors, two steering motors and brakes. Moving the stick forward powered the LRV forward, left and right turned the vehicle left or right, pulling backwards activated the brakes. Activating a switch on the handle before pulling back would put the LRV into reverse. Pulling the handle all the way back activated a parking brake. The control and display modules were situated in front of the handle and gave information on the speed, heading, pitch, and power and temperature levels.

Navigation was based on continuously recording direction and distance through use of a directional gyro and odometer and inputting this data to a computer which would keep track of the overall direction and distance back to the LM. There was also a Sun-shadow device which could give a manual heading based on the direction of the Sun, using the fact that the Sun moved very slowly in the sky.

Posted by Quadrofonic Wingnut on 2007-04-03 04:14:58

Tagged: , Cosmosphere , Hutchison , Kansas , NASA , manned , space , exploration , Apollo , Saturn , moon , rover , rocket , museum , history

A Large Slice of Pye

A Large Slice of Pye

The huge structure known as The Air House at The National Gas Turbine Establishment at Pyestock, near Fleet UK.
These gargantuan machines would once have taken in air from outside, and forced it through iron pipes towards one of four "cells", where gas turbine, or jet, engines would have been subjected to wind speeds up to Mach 2 at equivalent pressures to those found at 60,000ft.
The engines used on Concorde were tested here in the 1960’s, a proud chapter in Britain’s historic aerospace programme. Due to ever increasing running costs and improvements in computer simulations, Pyestock was gradually closed down during the 1990’s, before being completely decommissioned in 2000.
The place is in extremely good condition, given that is has been closed for more than a decade. The only graffiti to be seen is from fellow urban explorers, with dozens of names scrawled into the layers of dust.

Posted by Trev.Pack on 2012-09-24 21:29:53

Tagged: , NGTE , Pyestock , urbex , urban , exploration , air house , abandoned , generator , turbines , jet , engine , testing , Concorde , gas turbine , Fleet , Hampshire , UK , industrial

Apollo Rover 2550cgs-b

Apollo Rover 2550cgs-b

The Lunar Roving Vehicle had a mass of 463 lbs and was designed to hold a payload of an additional 1,080 lbs on the lunar surface. The frame was 10 feet long with a wheelbase of 7.5 feet. The maximum height was 3.75 feet. The frame was made of aluminum alloy 2219 tubing welded assemblies and consisted of a 3 part chassis which was hinged in the center so it could be folded up and hung in the Lunar Module quad 1 bay. It had two side-by-side foldable seats made of tubular aluminum with nylon webbing and aluminum floor panels. An armrest was mounted between the seats, and each seat had adjustable footrests and a velcro seatbelt. A large mesh dish antenna was mounted on a mast on the front center of the rover. The suspension consisted of a double horizontal wishbone with upper and lower torsion bars and a damper unit between the chassis and upper wishbone. Fully loaded the LRV had a ground clearance of 14 inches.

The wheels consisted of a spun aluminum hub and an 32 inches diameter, 9 inch wide tire made of zinc coated woven .033 inch diameter steel strands attached to the rim and discs of formed aluminum. Titanium chevrons covered 50% of the contact area to provide traction. Inside the tire was a 25.5 inch diameter bump stop frame to protect the hub. Dust guards were mounted above the wheels. Each wheel had its own electric drive, a DC series wound 0.25 hp motor capable of 10,000 rpm, attached to the wheel via an 80:1 harmonic drive, and a mechanical brake unit. Maneuvering capability was provided through the use of front and rear steering motors. Each series wound DC steering motor was capable of 0.1 hp. Both sets of wheels would turn in opposite directions, giving a steering radius of 10 feet, or could be decoupled so only one set would be used for steering. They could also free-wheel in case of drive failure. Power was provided by two 36-volt silver-zinc potassium hydroxide non-rechargeable batteries with a capacity of 121 A·h. These were used to power the drive and steering motors and also a 36 volt utility outlet mounted on front of the LRV to power the communications relay unit or the TV camera.

A T-shaped hand controller situated between the two seats controlled the four drive motors, two steering motors and brakes. Moving the stick forward powered the LRV forward, left and right turned the vehicle left or right, pulling backwards activated the brakes. Activating a switch on the handle before pulling back would put the LRV into reverse. Pulling the handle all the way back activated a parking brake. The control and display modules were situated in front of the handle and gave information on the speed, heading, pitch, and power and temperature levels.

Navigation was based on continuously recording direction and distance through use of a directional gyro and odometer and inputting this data to a computer which would keep track of the overall direction and distance back to the LM. There was also a Sun-shadow device which could give a manual heading based on the direction of the Sun, using the fact that the Sun moved very slowly in the sky.

Posted by Quadrofonic Wingnut on 2007-04-03 04:14:57

Tagged: , Cosmosphere , Hutchison , Kansas , NASA , manned , space , exploration , Apollo , Saturn , moon , rover , rocket , museum , history

Office Chair

Office Chair

Visit www.vanishingnewengland.com for more photos and stories.

Posted by www.vanishingnewengland.com on 2015-07-31 18:17:31

Tagged: , Leavens , Awards , Trophies , Certificates , Printing , Manufacturing , Attleboro , Massachusetts , USA , Urbex , Urban , Exploration , Industry , Industrial , Computers , Keyboard , 90’s , decay , abandoned , building , trash , destroyed , graffiti , paint , tag , pipes , rot , water , insulation , shelves , adventure , trespassing , off , limits , explore , history , end , an , era , good , ole , days , historical , Bryan , Buckley , Canon , 70D , Tokina , 12-24 , long , exposure , dark , creepy , scary , horror , 2015 , July , Summer , overgrown , Nature , trees , bushes , moss , mold , asbestos , danger , dust

Fly Wheel

Fly Wheel

Visit www.vanishingnewengland.com for more photos and stories.

Posted by www.vanishingnewengland.com on 2015-07-31 18:17:35

Tagged: , Leavens , Awards , Trophies , Certificates , Printing , Manufacturing , Attleboro , Massachusetts , USA , Urbex , Urban , Exploration , Industry , Industrial , Computers , Keyboard , 90’s , decay , abandoned , building , trash , destroyed , graffiti , paint , tag , pipes , rot , water , insulation , shelves , adventure , trespassing , off , limits , explore , history , end , an , era , good , ole , days , historical , Bryan , Buckley , Canon , 70D , Tokina , 12-24 , long , exposure , dark , creepy , scary , horror , 2015 , July , Summer , overgrown , Nature , trees , bushes , moss , mold , asbestos , danger , dust