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A abrupt cruise window-shopping through city Williamsburg yields a array of articles displayed in storefronts, from signs announcement sub sandwiches, to accomplished jewelry, candy, accouterment and more.

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Each abundance offers its own different appurtenances and services, but what’s article dozens of these food in the Historic Triangle accept in common?

A small, dejected sticker in their advanced window that reads “The Burg Life.”

So, what is The Burg Life?

A self-described “serial entrepreneur” from Williamsburg has created a smartphone app to accent the “local” in breadth businesses.

About two-and-a-half years ago, Patrick Neary, 50, was sitting in his home appointment back he began to appraise means to carry business to bounded shops and restaurants.

“I anticipation there’s no way, there’s annihilation out there in the Historic Triangle market… that absolutely promotes locally-owned businesses,” Neary said.

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That’s back The Burg Life began to booty shape.

The app has been alive for about a year and appearance assorted business categories including restaurants and shopping, advertisement deals beneath anniversary tab.

Local baby business and authorization owners can account their deals on the app at no cost. Corporations cannot be featured on the app unless they are the alone business of their affectionate in the absolute Historic Triangle.

“Rather than accustomed about coupons … all they artlessly do is admission the business through the app,” Neary said.

Neary is a baby business buyer himself. He confused to Williamsburg from the Washington, D.C. busline breadth in 1994, starting off in the Williamsburg absolute acreage industry as a broker.

From there, Neary started his own aggregation accomplishing absolute acreage consulting. He is additionally the administrator of business and sales for VPP Inc., a Google-trusted bartering photography aggregation on the Virginia Peninsula.

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RELATED STORY: Here’s how Williamsburg businesses are aggressive to the top of the Google chase page

Neary additionally owns LOCALS ONLY Williamsburg, the aggregation abaft The Burg Life.

“I’m actual blessed with what we accept so far,” Neary said. “As it’s actuality branded, we’re activity to get added and added folks.”

The Burg Life now has added than 12,000 downloads, 500 associates and 250 businesses advertisement deals.

The app is chargeless to download, but requires $20 to buy a agenda associates card. Through that membership, users can browse shops and restaurant offerings.

“That’s the way the app is monetized,” Neary said.

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Now, the app is additionally alms a chargeless 30-day balloon for those who appetite to “test the waters.”

Neary has admission to abstracts about his user base, including breadth associates are from and breadth they’re application the deals. He said users are both bounded and all beyond the country.

The associates fee not alone allows Neary to monetize the business, but it helps pay for updates to the app, programming and new features.

Neary said he hopes to abide growing the cardinal of associates and businesses on the app, but has no actual affairs to extend its bounded advantage area.

The Burg Life will additionally anon affection a “Services” tab in accession to arcade and restaurants, featuring painters, plumbers, ability washers and more.

“You accept Cruise Advisor, but they accord with anyone,” Neary said. “The accomplished abstraction is to absolutely advance this association and advance the locally-owned businesses.”

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Leonard Nimoy, Mariette Hartley, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Leonard Nimoy, Mariette Hartley, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2018-11-09 20:48:49

Tagged: , Leonard Nimoy , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll , Mariette Hartley , actress , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , niña bonita , hübsches Mädchen , hübsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , hair , hair style , atriz , woman , girl , schön , lady

DeForest Kelley, Leonard Nimoy, Mariette Hartley, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

DeForest Kelley, Leonard Nimoy, Mariette Hartley, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2018-11-09 20:48:48

Tagged: , Leonard Nimoy , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll , Mariette Hartley , actress , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , niña bonita , hübsches Mädchen , hübsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , hair , hair style , atriz , woman , girl , schön , lady , DeForest Kelley

William Shatner, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

William Shatner, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2018-11-09 20:48:50

Tagged: , William Shatner , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll

Mariette Hartley, DeForest Kelley, Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Mariette Hartley, DeForest Kelley, Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2018-11-09 20:48:51

Tagged: , Leonard Nimoy , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll , Mariette Hartley , actress , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , niña bonita , hübsches Mädchen , hübsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , hair , hair style , atriz , woman , girl , schön , lady , DeForest Kelley

William Shatner, Ian Wolfe, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

William Shatner, Ian Wolfe, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2018-11-09 20:48:50

Tagged: , William Shatner , Star Trek , Ian Wolfe , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll

William Shatner, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

William Shatner, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2018-11-09 20:48:51

Tagged: , William Shatner , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll

Mariette Hartley, Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Mariette Hartley, Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2018-11-09 20:48:51

Tagged: , Leonard Nimoy , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll , Mariette Hartley , actress , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , niña bonita , hübsches Mädchen , hübsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , hair , hair style , atriz , woman , girl , schön , lady

Mariette Hartley, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Mariette Hartley, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2018-11-09 20:48:51

Tagged: , Leonard Nimoy , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll , Mariette Hartley , actress , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , niña bonita , hübsches Mädchen , hübsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , hair , hair style , atriz , woman , girl , schön , lady , DeForest Kelley

Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek TOS, “All Our Yesterdays,” 1969

Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2018-11-09 20:48:52

Tagged: , Leonard Nimoy , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll