Assistant Center Manager

Assistant Center Manager

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Job title: Assistant Center Manager

Company: Advance America

Job description: and/or to another person or receptacle; housekeeping/cleaning (vacuuming, dusting, cleaning windows, bathroom, etc., including exposure… to cleaning chemicals); use of office equipment to include computers; able to be physically present Monday through Saturday…

Expected salary: $12 per hour

Location: Newton, IA

Job date: Thu, 16 Aug 2018 07:55:46 GMT

Apply for the job now!

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Posted by wkozarew on 2018-08-20 14:17:41

Tagged: , Assistant , Center , Manager

Center of the Milky Way Galaxy, distorted annotation

Center of the Milky Way Galaxy, distorted annotation

Edited Chandra Space Telescope visualization of the center of the Milky Way Galaxy (our galaxy), with lots of stars and gas and energetic processes. Annotated by NASA and distorted by me.

Image source: chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2018/gcenter360/

Original caption: A new visualization provides an exceptional virtual trip — complete with a 360-degree view — to the center of our home galaxy, the Milky Way. This project, made using data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes, allows viewers to control their own exploration of the fascinating environment of volatile massive stars and powerful gravity around the monster black hole that lies in the center of the Milky Way.

The Earth is located about 26,000 light years, or about 150,000 trillion miles, from the center of the Galaxy. While humans cannot physically travel there, scientists have been able to study this region by using data from powerful telescopes that can detect light in a variety of forms, including X-ray and infrared light.

This visualization builds on infrared data with the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope of 30 massive stellar giants called Wolf-Rayet stars that orbit within about 1.5 light years of the center of our Galaxy. Powerful winds of gas streaming from the surface of these stars are carrying some of their outer layers into interstellar space.

When the outflowing gas collides with previously ejected gas from other stars, the collisions produce shock waves, similar to sonic booms, which permeate the area. These shock waves heat the gas to millions of degrees, which causes it to glow in X-rays. Extensive observations with Chandra of the central regions of the Milky Way have provided critical data about the temperature and distribution of this multimillion-degree gas.

Astronomers are interested in better understanding what role these Wolf-Rayet stars play in the cosmic neighborhood at the Milky Way’s center. In particular, they would like to know how the stars interact with the Galactic center’s most dominant resident: the supermassive black hole known as Sagittarius A* (abbreviated Sgr A*). Pre-eminent yet invisible, Sgr A* has the mass equivalent to some four million Suns.

The Galactic Center visualization is a 360-degree movie that immerses the viewer into a simulation of the center of our Galaxy. The viewer is at the location of Sgr A* and is able to see about 25 Wolf-Rayet stars (white, twinkling objects) orbiting Sgr A* as they continuously eject stellar winds (black to red to yellow color scale). These winds collide with each other, and then some of this material (yellow blobs) spirals towards Sgr A*. The movie shows two simulations, each of which start around 350 years in the past and span 500 years. The first simulation shows Sgr A* in a calm state, while the second contains a more violent Sgr A* that is expelling its own material, thereby turning off the accretion of clumped material (yellow blobs) that is so prominent in the first portion.

Scientists have used the visualization to examine the effects Sgr A* has on its stellar neighbors. As the strong gravity of Sgr A* pulls clumps of material inwards, tidal forces stretch the clumps as they get closer to the black hole. Sgr A* also impacts its surroundings through occasional outbursts from its vicinity that result in the expulsion of material away from the giant black hole, as shown in the later part of the movie. These outbursts can have the effect of clearing away some of the gas produced by the Wolf-Rayet winds.

The researchers, led by Christopher Russell of the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, used the visualization to understand the presence of previously detected X-rays in the shape of a disk that extend about 0.6 light years outward from Sgr A*. Their work shows that the amount of X-rays generated by these colliding winds depends on the strength of outbursts powered by Sgr A*, and also the amount of time that has elapsed since an eruption occurred. Stronger and more recent outbursts result in weaker X-ray emission.

The information provided by the theoretical modeling and a comparison with the strength of X-ray emission observed with Chandra led Russell and his colleagues to determine that Sgr A* most likely had a relatively powerful outburst that started within the last few centuries. Moreover, their findings suggest the outburst from the supermassive black hole is still affecting the region around Sgr A* even though it ended about one hundred years ago.

The 360-degree video of the Galactic Center is ideally viewed in virtual reality (VR) goggles, such as Samsung Gear VR or Google Cardboard. The video can also be viewed on smartphones using the YouTube app. Moving the phone around pans to show a different portion of the movie, mimicking the effect in the VR goggles. Finally, most browsers on a computer also allow 360-degree videos to be shown on YouTube. To look around, either click and drag the video, or click the direction pad in the corner.

Christopher Russell presented this new visualization and the related scientific findings at the 231st meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Washington, DC. Some of the results are based on a paper by Russell et al published in 2017 in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. An online version is here. The co-authors of this paper are Daniel Wang from University of Massachusetts in Amherst, Mass. and Jorge Cuadra from Pontifical Catholic University of Chile. NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, manages the Chandra program for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, controls Chandra’s science and flight operations.

Posted by sjrankin on 2018-01-11 04:56:18

Tagged: , 11 January 2018 , Edited , NASA , Milky Way , Galaxy , Center , Annotated , Chandra , Chandra Space Telescope , Sgr A* , Gas , Dust , Stars

Center of the Milky Way Galaxy

Center of the Milky Way Galaxy

Edited Chandra Space Telescope visualization of the center of the Milky Way Galaxy (our galaxy), with lots of stars and gas and energetic processes.

Image source: chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2018/gcenter360/

Original caption: A new visualization provides an exceptional virtual trip — complete with a 360-degree view — to the center of our home galaxy, the Milky Way. This project, made using data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes, allows viewers to control their own exploration of the fascinating environment of volatile massive stars and powerful gravity around the monster black hole that lies in the center of the Milky Way.

The Earth is located about 26,000 light years, or about 150,000 trillion miles, from the center of the Galaxy. While humans cannot physically travel there, scientists have been able to study this region by using data from powerful telescopes that can detect light in a variety of forms, including X-ray and infrared light.

This visualization builds on infrared data with the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope of 30 massive stellar giants called Wolf-Rayet stars that orbit within about 1.5 light years of the center of our Galaxy. Powerful winds of gas streaming from the surface of these stars are carrying some of their outer layers into interstellar space.

When the outflowing gas collides with previously ejected gas from other stars, the collisions produce shock waves, similar to sonic booms, which permeate the area. These shock waves heat the gas to millions of degrees, which causes it to glow in X-rays. Extensive observations with Chandra of the central regions of the Milky Way have provided critical data about the temperature and distribution of this multimillion-degree gas.

Astronomers are interested in better understanding what role these Wolf-Rayet stars play in the cosmic neighborhood at the Milky Way’s center. In particular, they would like to know how the stars interact with the Galactic center’s most dominant resident: the supermassive black hole known as Sagittarius A* (abbreviated Sgr A*). Pre-eminent yet invisible, Sgr A* has the mass equivalent to some four million Suns.

The Galactic Center visualization is a 360-degree movie that immerses the viewer into a simulation of the center of our Galaxy. The viewer is at the location of Sgr A* and is able to see about 25 Wolf-Rayet stars (white, twinkling objects) orbiting Sgr A* as they continuously eject stellar winds (black to red to yellow color scale). These winds collide with each other, and then some of this material (yellow blobs) spirals towards Sgr A*. The movie shows two simulations, each of which start around 350 years in the past and span 500 years. The first simulation shows Sgr A* in a calm state, while the second contains a more violent Sgr A* that is expelling its own material, thereby turning off the accretion of clumped material (yellow blobs) that is so prominent in the first portion.

Scientists have used the visualization to examine the effects Sgr A* has on its stellar neighbors. As the strong gravity of Sgr A* pulls clumps of material inwards, tidal forces stretch the clumps as they get closer to the black hole. Sgr A* also impacts its surroundings through occasional outbursts from its vicinity that result in the expulsion of material away from the giant black hole, as shown in the later part of the movie. These outbursts can have the effect of clearing away some of the gas produced by the Wolf-Rayet winds.

The researchers, led by Christopher Russell of the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, used the visualization to understand the presence of previously detected X-rays in the shape of a disk that extend about 0.6 light years outward from Sgr A*. Their work shows that the amount of X-rays generated by these colliding winds depends on the strength of outbursts powered by Sgr A*, and also the amount of time that has elapsed since an eruption occurred. Stronger and more recent outbursts result in weaker X-ray emission.

The information provided by the theoretical modeling and a comparison with the strength of X-ray emission observed with Chandra led Russell and his colleagues to determine that Sgr A* most likely had a relatively powerful outburst that started within the last few centuries. Moreover, their findings suggest the outburst from the supermassive black hole is still affecting the region around Sgr A* even though it ended about one hundred years ago.

The 360-degree video of the Galactic Center is ideally viewed in virtual reality (VR) goggles, such as Samsung Gear VR or Google Cardboard. The video can also be viewed on smartphones using the YouTube app. Moving the phone around pans to show a different portion of the movie, mimicking the effect in the VR goggles. Finally, most browsers on a computer also allow 360-degree videos to be shown on YouTube. To look around, either click and drag the video, or click the direction pad in the corner.

Christopher Russell presented this new visualization and the related scientific findings at the 231st meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Washington, DC. Some of the results are based on a paper by Russell et al published in 2017 in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. An online version is here. The co-authors of this paper are Daniel Wang from University of Massachusetts in Amherst, Mass. and Jorge Cuadra from Pontifical Catholic University of Chile. NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, manages the Chandra program for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, controls Chandra’s science and flight operations.

Posted by sjrankin on 2018-01-11 04:56:18

Tagged: , 11 January 2018 , Edited , NASA , Milky Way , Galaxy , Center , Chandra , Chandra Space Telescope , Sgr A* , Gas , Dust , Stars

Center of the Milky Way Galaxy, variant

Center of the Milky Way Galaxy, variant

Edited Chandra Space Telescope visualization of the center of the Milky Way Galaxy (our galaxy), with lots of stars and gas and energetic processes. Processing variant.

Image source: chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2018/gcenter360/

Original caption: A new visualization provides an exceptional virtual trip — complete with a 360-degree view — to the center of our home galaxy, the Milky Way. This project, made using data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes, allows viewers to control their own exploration of the fascinating environment of volatile massive stars and powerful gravity around the monster black hole that lies in the center of the Milky Way.

The Earth is located about 26,000 light years, or about 150,000 trillion miles, from the center of the Galaxy. While humans cannot physically travel there, scientists have been able to study this region by using data from powerful telescopes that can detect light in a variety of forms, including X-ray and infrared light.

This visualization builds on infrared data with the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope of 30 massive stellar giants called Wolf-Rayet stars that orbit within about 1.5 light years of the center of our Galaxy. Powerful winds of gas streaming from the surface of these stars are carrying some of their outer layers into interstellar space.

When the outflowing gas collides with previously ejected gas from other stars, the collisions produce shock waves, similar to sonic booms, which permeate the area. These shock waves heat the gas to millions of degrees, which causes it to glow in X-rays. Extensive observations with Chandra of the central regions of the Milky Way have provided critical data about the temperature and distribution of this multimillion-degree gas.

Astronomers are interested in better understanding what role these Wolf-Rayet stars play in the cosmic neighborhood at the Milky Way’s center. In particular, they would like to know how the stars interact with the Galactic center’s most dominant resident: the supermassive black hole known as Sagittarius A* (abbreviated Sgr A*). Pre-eminent yet invisible, Sgr A* has the mass equivalent to some four million Suns.

The Galactic Center visualization is a 360-degree movie that immerses the viewer into a simulation of the center of our Galaxy. The viewer is at the location of Sgr A* and is able to see about 25 Wolf-Rayet stars (white, twinkling objects) orbiting Sgr A* as they continuously eject stellar winds (black to red to yellow color scale). These winds collide with each other, and then some of this material (yellow blobs) spirals towards Sgr A*. The movie shows two simulations, each of which start around 350 years in the past and span 500 years. The first simulation shows Sgr A* in a calm state, while the second contains a more violent Sgr A* that is expelling its own material, thereby turning off the accretion of clumped material (yellow blobs) that is so prominent in the first portion.

Scientists have used the visualization to examine the effects Sgr A* has on its stellar neighbors. As the strong gravity of Sgr A* pulls clumps of material inwards, tidal forces stretch the clumps as they get closer to the black hole. Sgr A* also impacts its surroundings through occasional outbursts from its vicinity that result in the expulsion of material away from the giant black hole, as shown in the later part of the movie. These outbursts can have the effect of clearing away some of the gas produced by the Wolf-Rayet winds.

The researchers, led by Christopher Russell of the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, used the visualization to understand the presence of previously detected X-rays in the shape of a disk that extend about 0.6 light years outward from Sgr A*. Their work shows that the amount of X-rays generated by these colliding winds depends on the strength of outbursts powered by Sgr A*, and also the amount of time that has elapsed since an eruption occurred. Stronger and more recent outbursts result in weaker X-ray emission.

The information provided by the theoretical modeling and a comparison with the strength of X-ray emission observed with Chandra led Russell and his colleagues to determine that Sgr A* most likely had a relatively powerful outburst that started within the last few centuries. Moreover, their findings suggest the outburst from the supermassive black hole is still affecting the region around Sgr A* even though it ended about one hundred years ago.

The 360-degree video of the Galactic Center is ideally viewed in virtual reality (VR) goggles, such as Samsung Gear VR or Google Cardboard. The video can also be viewed on smartphones using the YouTube app. Moving the phone around pans to show a different portion of the movie, mimicking the effect in the VR goggles. Finally, most browsers on a computer also allow 360-degree videos to be shown on YouTube. To look around, either click and drag the video, or click the direction pad in the corner.

Christopher Russell presented this new visualization and the related scientific findings at the 231st meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Washington, DC. Some of the results are based on a paper by Russell et al published in 2017 in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. An online version is here. The co-authors of this paper are Daniel Wang from University of Massachusetts in Amherst, Mass. and Jorge Cuadra from Pontifical Catholic University of Chile. NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, manages the Chandra program for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, controls Chandra’s science and flight operations.

Posted by sjrankin on 2018-01-11 04:56:18

Tagged: , 11 January 2018 , Edited , NASA , Milky Way , Galaxy , Center , Chandra , Chandra Space Telescope , Sgr A* , Gas , Dust , Stars

Center of the Milky Way Galaxy, annotated

Center of the Milky Way Galaxy, annotated

Edited Chandra Space Telescope visualization of the center of the Milky Way Galaxy (our galaxy), with lots of stars and gas and energetic processes. Annotated by NASA.

Image source: chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2018/gcenter360/

Original caption: A new visualization provides an exceptional virtual trip — complete with a 360-degree view — to the center of our home galaxy, the Milky Way. This project, made using data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes, allows viewers to control their own exploration of the fascinating environment of volatile massive stars and powerful gravity around the monster black hole that lies in the center of the Milky Way.

The Earth is located about 26,000 light years, or about 150,000 trillion miles, from the center of the Galaxy. While humans cannot physically travel there, scientists have been able to study this region by using data from powerful telescopes that can detect light in a variety of forms, including X-ray and infrared light.

This visualization builds on infrared data with the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope of 30 massive stellar giants called Wolf-Rayet stars that orbit within about 1.5 light years of the center of our Galaxy. Powerful winds of gas streaming from the surface of these stars are carrying some of their outer layers into interstellar space.

When the outflowing gas collides with previously ejected gas from other stars, the collisions produce shock waves, similar to sonic booms, which permeate the area. These shock waves heat the gas to millions of degrees, which causes it to glow in X-rays. Extensive observations with Chandra of the central regions of the Milky Way have provided critical data about the temperature and distribution of this multimillion-degree gas.

Astronomers are interested in better understanding what role these Wolf-Rayet stars play in the cosmic neighborhood at the Milky Way’s center. In particular, they would like to know how the stars interact with the Galactic center’s most dominant resident: the supermassive black hole known as Sagittarius A* (abbreviated Sgr A*). Pre-eminent yet invisible, Sgr A* has the mass equivalent to some four million Suns.

The Galactic Center visualization is a 360-degree movie that immerses the viewer into a simulation of the center of our Galaxy. The viewer is at the location of Sgr A* and is able to see about 25 Wolf-Rayet stars (white, twinkling objects) orbiting Sgr A* as they continuously eject stellar winds (black to red to yellow color scale). These winds collide with each other, and then some of this material (yellow blobs) spirals towards Sgr A*. The movie shows two simulations, each of which start around 350 years in the past and span 500 years. The first simulation shows Sgr A* in a calm state, while the second contains a more violent Sgr A* that is expelling its own material, thereby turning off the accretion of clumped material (yellow blobs) that is so prominent in the first portion.

Scientists have used the visualization to examine the effects Sgr A* has on its stellar neighbors. As the strong gravity of Sgr A* pulls clumps of material inwards, tidal forces stretch the clumps as they get closer to the black hole. Sgr A* also impacts its surroundings through occasional outbursts from its vicinity that result in the expulsion of material away from the giant black hole, as shown in the later part of the movie. These outbursts can have the effect of clearing away some of the gas produced by the Wolf-Rayet winds.

The researchers, led by Christopher Russell of the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, used the visualization to understand the presence of previously detected X-rays in the shape of a disk that extend about 0.6 light years outward from Sgr A*. Their work shows that the amount of X-rays generated by these colliding winds depends on the strength of outbursts powered by Sgr A*, and also the amount of time that has elapsed since an eruption occurred. Stronger and more recent outbursts result in weaker X-ray emission.

The information provided by the theoretical modeling and a comparison with the strength of X-ray emission observed with Chandra led Russell and his colleagues to determine that Sgr A* most likely had a relatively powerful outburst that started within the last few centuries. Moreover, their findings suggest the outburst from the supermassive black hole is still affecting the region around Sgr A* even though it ended about one hundred years ago.

The 360-degree video of the Galactic Center is ideally viewed in virtual reality (VR) goggles, such as Samsung Gear VR or Google Cardboard. The video can also be viewed on smartphones using the YouTube app. Moving the phone around pans to show a different portion of the movie, mimicking the effect in the VR goggles. Finally, most browsers on a computer also allow 360-degree videos to be shown on YouTube. To look around, either click and drag the video, or click the direction pad in the corner.

Christopher Russell presented this new visualization and the related scientific findings at the 231st meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Washington, DC. Some of the results are based on a paper by Russell et al published in 2017 in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. An online version is here. The co-authors of this paper are Daniel Wang from University of Massachusetts in Amherst, Mass. and Jorge Cuadra from Pontifical Catholic University of Chile. NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, manages the Chandra program for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, controls Chandra’s science and flight operations.

Posted by sjrankin on 2018-01-11 04:56:18

Tagged: , 11 January 2018 , Edited , NASA , Milky Way , Galaxy , Center , Annotated , Chandra , Chandra Space Telescope , Sgr A* , Gas , Dust , Stars

Center of the Milky Way Galaxy, variant

Center of the Milky Way Galaxy, variant

Edited Chandra Space Telescope visualization of the center of the Milky Way Galaxy (our galaxy), with lots of stars and gas and energetic processes. Geometric variant.

Image source: chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2018/gcenter360/

Original caption: A new visualization provides an exceptional virtual trip — complete with a 360-degree view — to the center of our home galaxy, the Milky Way. This project, made using data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and other telescopes, allows viewers to control their own exploration of the fascinating environment of volatile massive stars and powerful gravity around the monster black hole that lies in the center of the Milky Way.

The Earth is located about 26,000 light years, or about 150,000 trillion miles, from the center of the Galaxy. While humans cannot physically travel there, scientists have been able to study this region by using data from powerful telescopes that can detect light in a variety of forms, including X-ray and infrared light.

This visualization builds on infrared data with the European Southern Observatory’s Very Large Telescope of 30 massive stellar giants called Wolf-Rayet stars that orbit within about 1.5 light years of the center of our Galaxy. Powerful winds of gas streaming from the surface of these stars are carrying some of their outer layers into interstellar space.

When the outflowing gas collides with previously ejected gas from other stars, the collisions produce shock waves, similar to sonic booms, which permeate the area. These shock waves heat the gas to millions of degrees, which causes it to glow in X-rays. Extensive observations with Chandra of the central regions of the Milky Way have provided critical data about the temperature and distribution of this multimillion-degree gas.

Astronomers are interested in better understanding what role these Wolf-Rayet stars play in the cosmic neighborhood at the Milky Way’s center. In particular, they would like to know how the stars interact with the Galactic center’s most dominant resident: the supermassive black hole known as Sagittarius A* (abbreviated Sgr A*). Pre-eminent yet invisible, Sgr A* has the mass equivalent to some four million Suns.

The Galactic Center visualization is a 360-degree movie that immerses the viewer into a simulation of the center of our Galaxy. The viewer is at the location of Sgr A* and is able to see about 25 Wolf-Rayet stars (white, twinkling objects) orbiting Sgr A* as they continuously eject stellar winds (black to red to yellow color scale). These winds collide with each other, and then some of this material (yellow blobs) spirals towards Sgr A*. The movie shows two simulations, each of which start around 350 years in the past and span 500 years. The first simulation shows Sgr A* in a calm state, while the second contains a more violent Sgr A* that is expelling its own material, thereby turning off the accretion of clumped material (yellow blobs) that is so prominent in the first portion.

Scientists have used the visualization to examine the effects Sgr A* has on its stellar neighbors. As the strong gravity of Sgr A* pulls clumps of material inwards, tidal forces stretch the clumps as they get closer to the black hole. Sgr A* also impacts its surroundings through occasional outbursts from its vicinity that result in the expulsion of material away from the giant black hole, as shown in the later part of the movie. These outbursts can have the effect of clearing away some of the gas produced by the Wolf-Rayet winds.

The researchers, led by Christopher Russell of the Pontifical Catholic University of Chile, used the visualization to understand the presence of previously detected X-rays in the shape of a disk that extend about 0.6 light years outward from Sgr A*. Their work shows that the amount of X-rays generated by these colliding winds depends on the strength of outbursts powered by Sgr A*, and also the amount of time that has elapsed since an eruption occurred. Stronger and more recent outbursts result in weaker X-ray emission.

The information provided by the theoretical modeling and a comparison with the strength of X-ray emission observed with Chandra led Russell and his colleagues to determine that Sgr A* most likely had a relatively powerful outburst that started within the last few centuries. Moreover, their findings suggest the outburst from the supermassive black hole is still affecting the region around Sgr A* even though it ended about one hundred years ago.

The 360-degree video of the Galactic Center is ideally viewed in virtual reality (VR) goggles, such as Samsung Gear VR or Google Cardboard. The video can also be viewed on smartphones using the YouTube app. Moving the phone around pans to show a different portion of the movie, mimicking the effect in the VR goggles. Finally, most browsers on a computer also allow 360-degree videos to be shown on YouTube. To look around, either click and drag the video, or click the direction pad in the corner.

Christopher Russell presented this new visualization and the related scientific findings at the 231st meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Washington, DC. Some of the results are based on a paper by Russell et al published in 2017 in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. An online version is here. The co-authors of this paper are Daniel Wang from University of Massachusetts in Amherst, Mass. and Jorge Cuadra from Pontifical Catholic University of Chile. NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, manages the Chandra program for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, controls Chandra’s science and flight operations.

Posted by sjrankin on 2018-01-11 04:56:18

Tagged: , 11 January 2018 , Edited , NASA , Milky Way , Galaxy , Center , Chandra , Chandra Space Telescope , Sgr A* , Gas , Dust , Stars

Siemens Machine Tool Experience Center Settled In Urban Areas

Siemens Machine Tool Experience Center Settled In Urban Areas
March 20, Siemens Nanjing, Jiangsu province, to show the second machine center was established experience. The center is located in the urban Jiangzhou Road, following Zhejiang Cixi, Wenzhou and Chongqing, the Siemens set up in China’s fourth Experience Center machine.

The Experience Center area with experience, training areas, machine tool display area and spare parts area, can provide display of CNC machine tools, training, testing parallel machining, maintenance and other train services. CNC machine tools in a former staff on site will be a special-shaped aluminum alloy flashlight shell shape a turning. Many visitors stop and look, as in the appreciation of a work of art.

“Siemens demonstrated experience setting up CNC center, with the cooperation we seek high-end coincides with the idea for the machine tool industry to upgrade Hailing provides a good opportunity.” Hailing committee secretary Yang Jie said.

In recent years, Hailing the rapid development of special machine tools industry, the existing registered companies from more than 80 CNC machine tools, ancillary services, nearly 100 companies, machine tool more than 30,000 units annually, including brisk walking cut wire cutting machine tool in the domestic market share of 50 %.

Siemens company official said, many areas in China, Siemens has become a part of the local economy. The machine tool industry, the Siemens is a global leader in CNC technology, Hailing machine tools have a certain influence in the country, plenty of room for cooperation between the two sides.

“Siemens demonstrated experience setting up centers, like a beautiful erected Xiulou, she should seek the most robust young man marriage.” Hailing the main Ren Pengjun Economic and Trade Commission said that the current number of machine tool manufacturers Hailing actively and domestic research institutions, institutions of higher learning to cooperate, and constantly develop the products with independent intellectual property rights, but most are still in the low-end enterprise products. Siemens Machine Tool Experience Center’s presence, to promote the area to high-end development of CNC machine tool industry will play a catalytic role.

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University Park Texas: Where College Town Meets Urban Center

University Park Texas: Where College Town Meets Urban Center

Covering just 3.72 acres, University Park, Texas seems to be all but swallowed up by the big city. Bordered on three sides by Highland Park and on the south by Dallas, the suburb is known as a premier residential location for families and singles wanting to buy or lease a property. At its true heart, however, University Park, the home of Southern Methodist University, is one of the most unique college towns in Texas just five miles from downtown Dallas.

SMU, founded in 1911, occupies a  210-acre urban campus. Approximately 6,000 undergraduates and 4,693 post-graduates are taught by 603 full-time faculty members. Together, this population, as well as the residents of the surrounding neighborhoods, form the core of an active scholarly, social, and community life.

Seven Degree-Granting Schools

There are seven schools at SMU granting degrees to undergraduates and post-graduates. Of these, the Cox School of Business was ranked first in the nation by The Economist” for its “potential to network,” while the Dedman School of Law placed 46th in U.S. News and World Report’s rankings of America’s Best Graduate Schools in 2009. The other SMU schools include the Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, the Meadows School of the Arts, the Perkins School of Theology, the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education & Human Development, and the Lyle School of Engineering.

Center for Research and Scholarship

SMU boasts a total of ten libraries, which collectively comprise the largest privately-held body of research resources in the American Southwest. Among those, the Bridwell Library is recognized as a premier theological collection, while the Central University Libraries, the largest in the system, have a catalog of more than 2 million volumes. Additionally, the Edwin J. Foscue Map Library maintains one of the most extensive cartographic collections in America.

George W. Bush Presidential Library

The George W. Bush Presidential Library and the George W. Bush Policy Institute will be located on the southeast side of the SMU campus and will include a museum open to the public and an archive for researchers. Groundbreaking ceremonies for the 227,000 sq. ft. complex will be held in November 2010 with the approximately $ 250 million project slated for completion in 2013. The design calls for a structure of red brick and Texas limestone with a central tower, all chosen to blend with the Georgian Revival architecture of the surrounding university buildings with landscaping incorporating native Texas grasses and wildflowers.

On-Campus Museums

SMU maintains two museums. The Pollock Gallery serves as a showcase for rotating exhibits of works by faculty and students in a range of media, as well as providing a venue for shows by artists not affiliated with the Meadows School of the Arts. The Meadows Museum is home to a collection of Spanish works spanning the tenth to the 21st centuries and includes sculptures by Rodin, Maillol, and Giacometti, as well as pieces by modern contemporary sculptors.

Performance Venues and Athletic Contests

Throughout the year, the calendar at the McFarlin Memorial Auditorium offers a range of speakers, performers, and touring troupes that have, over the past 80 years, included such widely diverse figures and groups as: Martha Graham, Salvadore Dali, the American Ballet Theatre, Itzak Perlman, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Elton John, Sir John Gielgud, Vincent Price, Yo-Yo Ma, the Houston Ballet, W.H. Auden, Harry Connick, Jr., Luciano Pavarotti, Barry Manilow, Blondie, Fleetwood Mac, Melissa Etheridge, the Monterey Jazz Festival, and Dashboard Confessional.

The SMU Mustangs participate in the NCAA Division I and are a member of Conference USA. Football games are played in the Gerald J. Ford Stadium on campus with the school’s closest rival being neighboring Texas Christian University in Fort Worth. Before every home game, students, faculty, staff, and alumni gather on the school’s main street, Bishop Boulevard, for pre-game festivities including food tents and entertainment, with pets and children welcome.

Beautiful Holiday Tradition of Lights

Each December, a candlelight ceremony with music and readings is held on the Main Quad. The University president traditionally reads the Christmas story from the Christian Bible and choirs from the Meadows School of Arts and neighboring high schools lead the crowd in singing carols. At the culmination of the evening, the lights decorating Dallas Hall and the trees surrounding it are lit in a Celebration of Lights that is a well-loved staple of the community.

Residents of University Park have the unique opportunity to live in the third largest city in Texas and in a tiny college town where day-to-day life naturally blends on and off-campus activities. With all the benefits of the the 12th largest metro economy in the world, residents can still enjoy a walk on campus, a student art show or play, and tailgating for a home game. University Parks stands out among all the Dallas suburbs for this very mix: modern and traditional, small and large, urban center and beloved alma mater.

Paul Marshall is an Internet Marketing Consultant and d-i-y Internet Marketing Coach, specializing in small business and new business start-ups. Paul has been marketing online since 2004. Additionally, he has over 25 years of marketing experience, including in the tough fields of insurance, mortgages and real estate.

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turpanzhan

turpanzhan

On 9/11 I was traveling in Xingjiang Province in China, waiting for the night train from Turpan Zhan to Dunhuang. By chance, there was an Internet cafe next to the train station, so I went in and found a computer between some Chinese soldiers and a young Uyghur man chatting online with friends. Most Western news organizations were blocked in China, but Excite.com, where I had an email account, somehow got past the censors. When the page loaded, I saw the news that the WTC had been hit by a plane.

It just so happened that my girlfriend in Japan (now my wife) was online and so she relayed to me the news she was watching on her television. Occasionally, I would look around, only to find that the Chinese world was still unaware of what was happening on the other side of the planet.

When it came time to board my train, I was left in the dark. How many more planes were out there? Who was doing it? What would the world look like when I had a chance to check the Internet the next day. Looking around at the Chinese web surfers, I knew that nobody within hundreds of miles had heard the news. In fact, it would be another day before the Muslim inhabitants of Western China were allowed to hear about the attacks. And so, I had only my dark thoughts on that long, lonely trip.

Posted by zanzo on 2007-01-26 09:09:25

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Your individual Urban center Must Produce a Skatepark

Your individual Urban center Must Produce a Skatepark

Those who are even a modest involving professional skateboarding, you could be exspecting the particular significant anxiousness amongst skaters and thus area officers. Skateboarding is certainly a modern video game. Because of this , easily your favorite skate boarder looks for i’ll get to challenging compared with what is offered by your playground little ramp. Your man amazing contacts skate out partying and frequently captivate surplus undivided attention out of your police. So that you can are typically jammed in the centre.

It’s clear the difficulty. Your offspring are seeking choice together with task, as well as govt wish keep all kinds of things tidy and in addition classified. And in addition skate boarding can lead to difficulties for various premises, however the insurance coverage troubles of your skater cause pain in relation to private building. Don’t ever this twain would make contact with.Alternatively do they? There is certainly well over 8 ton of skate boarders inside of the U.Ings. Lots of smaller communities are suffering from and looked at a devoted skateboarding national park. A new well-designed skate dog park goes out a considerable ways on the way to dealing with issue. Original, allow us to position the importance of a very skateboard pool through circumstance in contemplating all the town backed adventures hospitals. A wise option will be to check out the primary spots necessary for just as Skateboard Recreation area get back of a particular baseball or even baseball market.

Just forget about parks. Consider simply the proportions of a new mastering community only. An extremely perfect skateboarding playground might take an acre, yet much can be done through much. A suitable skiing engagement normally requires almost Have a look at acres for solid ground. A playing golf sphere normally requires about 2 miles. Consequently straight away (not carryout a word play here), you’re fitting by having a skate pool. Even, just about each metropolis supplies services pertaining to softball and consequently tennis, however as a number of in excess young people skate.We’ll perform current day release associated with the History with Two different Metropolitan areas (in this instance, not one but two urban centers, as well as individual will go below the guillotine.

The town Some sort of is a really practically individuals community with numerous supplies. Certainly not no person likes to education, it really is 14th martial arts precious gems, or sometimes Fifty six miles focused on martial arts. They’re just from surprisingly involved apply, calculating in regard to 3 hours an afternoon. At an typical with $ 500,1000 any acre, the neighborhood also has about $ 28 million dollars associated with ground invested in basketball game. A few years ago, this town assembled a fabulous skateboard store coordinated with a respected social establishment. Getting this done protects most of an acre there are lots of surprisingly delicate includes. It is acceptable for 5 to 8 365 days olds coupled with new comers. However it’s the product skateboard woodland.

The application run you with regard to $ 100,500 at the top of any 50 percent of acre related with country. There aren’t many other locations around for the purpose of skate boarding. The place penalty charges $ 10 Per day time a young fella to produce it while having modest working hours over $ 25 every single on a entirely softball niche, that could cater for 75 little ones during the period of from. Conclusion: a skateboarding schoolyard is in fact no longer second hand pricy, as opposed to interesting, without portable toilet businesses.

 

 Your individual Urban center Must Produce a Skatepark