Flaming star and Tadpoles Nebulae

Flaming star and Tadpoles Nebulae

After what seems like weeks of cloudy nights, last night I grabbed an unexpected few hours of clear, frosty sky and headed 1500 light years away to the Flaming Star (left) and Tadpoles (right) Nebulae in the constellation Auriga.

This shot took 5 hours to expose, a stack of 97 images, each 3 minutes long and was then calibrated with a further 140 calibration frames. With time at the computer to edit all the combined images the whole process took about 9 hours in total.

William Optics GT81
William Optics Flat 6AIII
ZWO ASI2600MC Pro
ZWO ASI Air Pro
Skywatcher HEQ 5 Pro
Optolong L-eNhance filter

97 x 300s lights, 40 darks, 50 flats, 50 dark flats at gain 100 and cooled to -10C.
Stacked in DSS and processed in PS and LR

Posted by Shane Jones on 2020-12-13 15:14:51

Tagged: , Flaming Star Nebula , Tadpoles Nebula , Nebula , Nebulosity , Space , Auriga , Dust , Stars , Celestial , Astro , Astrophotography , Astronomy , William Optics GT81 , Flat 6AIII , ZWO ASI 2600 MC Pro , L-eNhance , Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro

Apollo 17 Celestial Navigation Post-Lunar-Landing Star Chart

Apollo 17 Celestial Navigation Post-Lunar-Landing Star Chart

A critical celestial navigational device used inside the Lunar Module bearing traces of lunar dust. This is a post-landing, 8-inch diameter, circular star chart. All major stars and constellations visible from the Taurus-Littrow landing site are plotted underneath a rotating translucent position locator. The locator has six concentric circular plots, sixty degrees apart, that correspond to position locators set for the Alignment Optical Telescope inside the Lunar Module. The Velcro patch on the reverse shows traces of lunar dust.

“In some ways, when we voyaged to the moon, we were not unlike ancient mariners of the past. The stars were not only to light our way, but were used to guide us to our destination. We had onboard a sextant and telescope similar to what has been used for thousands of years but to make them useful we had to know what the heavens looked like, where the stars were, be able to recognize them and tell our computer through the sextant exactly what stars we were tracking. As a quick reference, we took star charts.. and those star charts of particular importance were the ones we carried to the lunar surface. Our first concern after landing would be to prepare for an immediate lift off in case of emergency. In order to assure that our lift off be successful so that we could subsequently rendezvous with our Command Module, we had to be absolutely sure of our Lunar Module’s position and orientation on the Lunar surface.”
— Eugene Cernan, Commander Apollo XVII in accompanying signed letter

When the Star Charts for Apollo were designed, three stars’ names were made up by Gus Ivan Grissom as a tribute to his fellow Apollo 1 crew members. Star number 3 was named “NAVI,” which is Grissom’s middle name spelled backwards. Star number 17 was named “REGOR,” which is Roger (Chaffee) spelled backwards. Star number 20 was named “DNOCES,” which is Second (Ed White II) spelled backwards. After the tragic deaths of the Apollo 1 crew in a training accident, NASA honored the men by maintaining the names on all of the Star Charts.

15×32" in frame (x22" when closed)

From “Mooncollector” Jim Ruddy lifetime collection, When Jim turned 82 and his health was failing, he wanted to bundle his collection of lunar surface artifacts together in a single sale to someone who would care for them, and so he contacted me. I agreed to procure the collection and spent some time with him discussing each artifact at his home in Palm Springs. He was meticulous and carefully framed each precious treasure. Soon after I added this to the FV space collection in 2015, he passed away.

Posted by jurvetson on 2020-02-03 04:46:37

Tagged: , Space , Collection , Lunar , Flown , Artifacts , Jim , Ruddy , Apollo , Mooncollector , Blue , 17 , Celestial , Navigation , Post-Landing , Star , Chart

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

‘The Dish’ is a well known Australian movie about how this radio telescope at Parkes, NSW, played a major role covering the moon landing in 1969.

I had seen both the movie and some amazing images taken by Simon, a member of Barossa Photography Club so I thought I would also give it a go. Each of these exposures took about 30 minutes – I didn’t get there until nearly 10pm so these (and some which didn’t work out) meant it was getting very late when I finished!

From: www.csiro.au/Portals/Education/Programs/Parkes-Radio-Tele…

The Telescope

CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope is a 64-m diameter parabolic dish used for radio astronomy. It is located about 20 km north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), and about 380 km west of Sydney.

It is operated by CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), a business unit of CSIRO. CASS also operates the Australia Telescope Compact Array near Narrabri, NSW, and the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and is developing the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope in Western Australia.

The telescope was built in 1961, but only its basic structure has remained unchanged. The surface, control system, focus cabin, receivers, computers and cabling have all been upgraded – some parts many times – to keep the telescope current.

The telescope is now ten thousand times more sensitive than when commissioned in 1961.
Using the Telescope

The telescope operates twenty four hours per day, through rain and cloud. About 85 per cent of all time each year is scheduled for observing. Less than five per cent of that is lost because of high winds or equipment problems. Most of the rest of the time each year is used for maintenance and testing. Around 300 researchers use the telescope each year, and more than 40 per cent of these users are from overseas.

The moving part of the dish is not fixed to the top of the tower but just sits on it. Because the large surface catches the wind like a sail, the telescope must be ‘stowed’ (pointed directly up) when the wind exceeds 35 km an hour.
Radio Astronomy

The radio waves from objects in space are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. The power received from a strong cosmic radio source by the Parkes telescope is about a hundredth of a millionth of a millionth of a watt (10-14 W). If you wanted to heat water with this power it would take about 70 000 years to heat one drop by one degree Celsius.

Galaxies contain stars, gas and dust. The gas – mostly hydrogen – is the raw material from which stars form. It emits radio waves, at a frequency of 1420 MHz. Radio astronomers spend a lot of time studying this gas, learning where it is and how it is moving.

Astronomers don’t look through the telescope. Instead, signal processing systems and computers take the radio waves the telescope collects and turns them into pictures (like photographs) of objects in space.

I was very lucky to get the loan of a car and drive to Sydney – a distance of some 1,400 kilometers (around 750 miles). Having seen some amazing night shots of the radio telescope at Parkes, I decided to go that way and spend my first night at Parkes.

Posted by Strabanephotos on 2013-09-09 07:12:54

Tagged: , The , Dish , CSIRO , Radio , Telescope , Parkes , New , South , Wales , Australia , nsw , monday , 2nd , september , 2013 , long , exposure , star , trails , celestial , pole

Stars circling around the Celestial South Pole, The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

Stars circling around the Celestial South Pole, The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

‘The Dish’ is a well known Australian movie about how this radio telescope at Parkes, NSW, played a major role covering the moon landing in 1969.

I had seen both the movie and some amazing images taken by Simon, a member of Barossa Photography Club so I thought I would also give it a go. Each of these exposures took about 30 minutes – I didn’t get there until nearly 10pm so these (and some which didn’t work out) meant it was getting very late when I finished!

From: www.csiro.au/Portals/Education/Programs/Parkes-Radio-Tele…

The Telescope

CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope is a 64-m diameter parabolic dish used for radio astronomy. It is located about 20 km north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), and about 380 km west of Sydney.

It is operated by CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), a business unit of CSIRO. CASS also operates the Australia Telescope Compact Array near Narrabri, NSW, and the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and is developing the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope in Western Australia.

The telescope was built in 1961, but only its basic structure has remained unchanged. The surface, control system, focus cabin, receivers, computers and cabling have all been upgraded – some parts many times – to keep the telescope current.

The telescope is now ten thousand times more sensitive than when commissioned in 1961.
Using the Telescope

The telescope operates twenty four hours per day, through rain and cloud. About 85 per cent of all time each year is scheduled for observing. Less than five per cent of that is lost because of high winds or equipment problems. Most of the rest of the time each year is used for maintenance and testing. Around 300 researchers use the telescope each year, and more than 40 per cent of these users are from overseas.

The moving part of the dish is not fixed to the top of the tower but just sits on it. Because the large surface catches the wind like a sail, the telescope must be ‘stowed’ (pointed directly up) when the wind exceeds 35 km an hour.
Radio Astronomy

The radio waves from objects in space are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. The power received from a strong cosmic radio source by the Parkes telescope is about a hundredth of a millionth of a millionth of a watt (10-14 W). If you wanted to heat water with this power it would take about 70 000 years to heat one drop by one degree Celsius.

Galaxies contain stars, gas and dust. The gas – mostly hydrogen – is the raw material from which stars form. It emits radio waves, at a frequency of 1420 MHz. Radio astronomers spend a lot of time studying this gas, learning where it is and how it is moving.

Astronomers don’t look through the telescope. Instead, signal processing systems and computers take the radio waves the telescope collects and turns them into pictures (like photographs) of objects in space.

I was very lucky to get the loan of a car and drive to Sydney – a distance of some 1,400 kilometers (around 750 miles). Having seen some amazing night shots of the radio telescope at Parkes, I decided to go that way and spend my first night at Parkes.

Posted by Strabanephotos on 2013-09-09 07:13:00

Tagged: , The , Dish , CSIRO , Radio , Telescope , Parkes , New , South , Wales , Australia , nsw , monday , 2nd , september , 2013 , long , exposure , star , trails , celestial , pole

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

The dish was continually moving – usually by small amounts, presumably as the stars moved – but it the middle of a 30 minute exposure it made a huge movement. So the dish is turning round, you can see the stars moving round, the earth is spinning – made me feel quite dizzy 🙂

‘The Dish’ is a well known Australian movie about how this radio telescope at Parkes, NSW, played a major role covering the moon landing in 1969.

I had seen both the movie and some amazing images taken by Simon, a member of Barossa Photography Club so I thought I would also give it a go. Each of these exposures took about 30 minutes – I didn’t get there until nearly 10pm so these (and some which didn’t work out) meant it was getting very late when I finished!

From: www.csiro.au/Portals/Education/Programs/Parkes-Radio-Tele…

The Telescope

CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope is a 64-m diameter parabolic dish used for radio astronomy. It is located about 20 km north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), and about 380 km west of Sydney.

It is operated by CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), a business unit of CSIRO. CASS also operates the Australia Telescope Compact Array near Narrabri, NSW, and the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and is developing the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope in Western Australia.

The telescope was built in 1961, but only its basic structure has remained unchanged. The surface, control system, focus cabin, receivers, computers and cabling have all been upgraded – some parts many times – to keep the telescope current.

The telescope is now ten thousand times more sensitive than when commissioned in 1961.
Using the Telescope

The telescope operates twenty four hours per day, through rain and cloud. About 85 per cent of all time each year is scheduled for observing. Less than five per cent of that is lost because of high winds or equipment problems. Most of the rest of the time each year is used for maintenance and testing. Around 300 researchers use the telescope each year, and more than 40 per cent of these users are from overseas.

The moving part of the dish is not fixed to the top of the tower but just sits on it. Because the large surface catches the wind like a sail, the telescope must be ‘stowed’ (pointed directly up) when the wind exceeds 35 km an hour.
Radio Astronomy

The radio waves from objects in space are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. The power received from a strong cosmic radio source by the Parkes telescope is about a hundredth of a millionth of a millionth of a watt (10-14 W). If you wanted to heat water with this power it would take about 70 000 years to heat one drop by one degree Celsius.

Galaxies contain stars, gas and dust. The gas – mostly hydrogen – is the raw material from which stars form. It emits radio waves, at a frequency of 1420 MHz. Radio astronomers spend a lot of time studying this gas, learning where it is and how it is moving.

Astronomers don’t look through the telescope. Instead, signal processing systems and computers take the radio waves the telescope collects and turns them into pictures (like photographs) of objects in space.

I was very lucky to get the loan of a car and drive to Sydney – a distance of some 1,400 kilometers (around 750 miles). Having seen some amazing night shots of the radio telescope at Parkes, I decided to go that way and spend my first night at Parkes.

Posted by Strabanephotos on 2013-09-09 07:13:06

Tagged: , The , Dish , CSIRO , Radio , Telescope , Parkes , New , South , Wales , Australia , nsw , monday , 2nd , september , 2013 , long , exposure , star , trails , celestial , pole