IMG_5445

IMG_5445

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:33:14

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5417

IMG_5417

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:32:59

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5428

IMG_5428

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:33:04

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5413

IMG_5413

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:32:57

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5426

IMG_5426

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:33:03

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5414

IMG_5414

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:32:57

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5412

IMG_5412

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

Posted by Autistic Reality on 2016-05-17 19:32:57

Tagged: , Ahmanson Hall of the Sky , Sky , Skies , Hall , Halls , Hall of the Sky , SoCal , California , CA , USA , US , America , Observatory , Observatories , State of California , Los Angeles , Los Angeles County , Los Feliz , Art Deco , Griffith Observatory , United States of America , United States , Landmarks , Landmark , LA , City of Los Angeles , Astronomy , Observation , Observing , Stargazing , Griffith J. Griffith , Science , Sciences , Building , Buildings , Structure , Structures , Architecture , Griffith Trust , John C. Austin , Frederick M. Ashley , Griffith Park , Park , Parks , Monument , Monuments , Russell W. Porter , Santa Monica Mountains , Mountain , Mountains , Interior , Interiors , Inside , Insides , Indoor , Indoors

IMG_5416

IMG_5416

Elements

Everything around us contains material that was once part of a star. The cells in our bodies, the air we breathe, and materials that make up the planets in our solar system are all linked to the stars through chemical elements.

Hydrogen and helium are the two most abundant elements. They were made in the Big Bang more than 13 billion years ago. Others, like oxygen and iron, are created deep inside stars. Supernova explosions blast them into space and form even heavier elements, such as gold and uranium.

Everyday Elements

Chemical elements are the building blocks of everything. The Sun and stars, the silicon chips in our computers, and all the cells in our bodies are collections of elements.

Hydrogen is the lightest and most plentiful element. It has one proton, one electron, and an atomic number of 1. It was created in the Big Bang, along with helium. The other elements up to uranium (number 92) are made in stars.

Elements Made by People

When physicists smash smaller atoms together during experiments in nuclear accelerators and reactors, they create elements that have atomic numbers higher than 92. Neptunium, californium, and plutonium (which is used in spacecraft power supplies) are good examples of these elements. Scientists also study the tracks atomic particles make in bubble chambers during high-speed experiments (right).

Formation and Distribution

Big Bang

The nuclei of the three most basic and plentiful elements in the universe began forming during the first 100 seconds after the Big Bang.

Stars

Atomic reactions deep inside stars combine atoms to form many of the familiar elements that make up planets, stars, galaxies, and us.

Supernovae

The extremely high temperatures and pressures inside exploding stars help create the heaviest elements. Supernova explosions scatter them throughout space.

Humans

Our bodies contain more than two dozen elements. We are made of material that was created in stars.

Gases

Most elements are solids and liquids at room temperature. Eleven are gases.

Stars, People, and Atoms

Elements in Us

The human body is mostly hydrogen and oxygen, with traces of other elements (color coded to the elements table).

How Elements Reach Our Bodies

If you want to know where most elements originate, look at the night sky. Most of the stars and all the planets you see came from materials cooked up deep inside other stars. When those stars died, their elements were scattered into space in gas and dust clouds.

•A nebula is the graveyard of a star that exploded as a supernova. Material in the cloud may become new stars.

We, too, are part of the cosmic recycling process. It began billions of years ago inside an ancient star. The calcium in our bones, iron in our blood, and oxygen in our lungs were all created inside that long-dead star.

•Look at your hand. It is a piece of the universe. Its millions of skin cells are each made of elements from stars.

Elements are the building blocks of the universe. Atoms are the basic units of elements. Most atoms are made up of three types of particles: protons, neutrons, and electrons. Every structure in the cosmos is made of atoms from many different elements.

•Each droplet of carbon is a tenth of the width of a human hair and contains thousands of atoms.

Creation of Elements in Supernova Explosions

Thanks to stars and the elements they create, the universe renews itself. When stars die, their material gets scattered through space as the seeds for new generations of stars. The heaviest elements are created in huge stellar explosions like Supernova 1987a (left). Temperatures and pressures in these outbursts are so high that atoms fuse to make more complex elements, such as lead, gold, and uranium.

The Fingerprints of Elements

Light from celestial objects identifies the chemical elements they contain. Each element has a specific fingerprint, which we can see with a spectroscope. Helium and neon are made inside stars. Helium’s spectral fingerprint is simple, while neon has many more lines. Elements like krypton and mercury are created in supernova explosions.

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power supply [Day 3595]

power supply [Day 3595]

One of the side benefits of running a LAN party for virtual Blizzcon is that since I move my gaming PC out to the dining room area for the event, when it comes time to move it back it’s a great opportunity to open up the case and do some dusting. This sort of maintenance helps keep things running in top shape!

Photo-a-Day: Year 10, Day 308 – Total Days: 3,595

Posted by brianjmatis on 2018-11-05 06:38:27

Tagged: , PC , LAN Party , Corsair , photo a day , technology , electronics , gaming , power supply , computer , case , project365 , San Luis Obispo , California , United States , US

The Biggest Contribution Of Sports Card Shows To Humanity | sports card shows

The Biggest Contribution Of Sports Card Shows To Humanity | sports card shows

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Houston Astros brilliant Alex Bregman took Major League Baseball by storm in 2018. Not alone did he accept an MVP-caliber year, but his personality was on abounding affectation during Houston’s AL West-winning season, authoritative him one of the best adolescent players to watch in the bold — for added than one reason.

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One affair you’ll apprentice in this week’s cast new adventure of “Old Baseball Cards,” our baseball-card apprenticed homesickness appearance actuality on Beast Sports, is that Bregman additionally has a advantageous account for the history of the game. We were activity to do article altered on this week’s appearance and accessible some new accepted baseball cards with a accepted brilliant of the game. But Bregman capital to dip aback into 1999.

So you’ll acquisition us aperture 1999 Fleer Ultra and some 2018 Topps Archives, which has some earlier players alloyed with new. Along the way, we allocution about greats like Cal Ripken Jr. and Rickey Henderson, additional accepted players like Evan Longoria and Carson Fulmer. Our best acquisition is Mark McGwire, who Bregman dressed up as for Halloween eight years in a row, he says. It’s a fun adventure with a fun player.

Alex Bregman talks about his acquaintance Carson Fulmer on “Old Baseball Cards.” (Yahoo Sports)

If you’re new to our series, we accessible old packs of cards with players, coaches and acclaimed fans. It’s generally with the greats of the game, but we’re blessed to affection some of MLB’s adolescent claret in this episode. We’re not attractive for cool admired cards on “Old Baseball Cards” — but that would be abundant — we’re absolutely attractive for abundant stories, memories and reactions.

COMC is heading to some Card Shows this weekend! | COMC Blog – sports card shows | sports card shows

If you dig this episode, I’d acclaim you additionally analysis out our eps with CC Sabathia, Curtis Granderson and A.J. Ellis.

Previously on Old Baseball CardsMUST-SEE EPISODES: David Ross | Dave Winfield | Tim Raines | Thomas Ian Nicholas aka Henry Rowengartner | Mike Krukow | Gary Vee | Randy Johnson | Felipe Alou | George Brett | Torey Lovullo | Pedro Martinez | Bronson Arroyo | Eric Davis | Dusty Baker | Hank Azaria | Alex Rodriguez | Scott Boras | A.J. Ellis | Bernie Williams | Chase Utley | John Smoltz | Best trades of 2017 | Best finds of 2017 | Best Guests of 2017 (Part 1) | Best Guests of 2017 (Part 2)

CROSSOVER EPISODES: The Miz | Metta World Peace | Jazzy Jeff

STARS FROM BACK IN THE DAY: Fred Lynn | Eduardo Perez | J.J. Putz | Luis Gonzalez | Duane Kuiper | Edgar Martinez | Ryne Sandberg | Frank Thomas | Sandy Alomar Jr. | Delino DeShields | Cliff Floyd | Dan Plesac | Aaron Boone | Bobby Bonilla | Andre Dawson | Ivan Rodriguez | Jack Morris | Jeff Nelson | Mark Teixeira | Rick Ankiel | Kevin Millar

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MANAGERS/COACHES: Terry Francona | Joe Maddon | Bruce Bochy | Clint Hurdle | Buck Showalter | Brad Mills | Bob Melvin | Dave Roberts | Gabe Kapler | Alex Cora | Dave Martinez | Ron Gardenhire | Scott Servais

CURRENT PLAYERS: CC Sabathia | Curtis Granderson | Noah Syndergaard | Kyle Hendricks | Clayton Kershaw | Todd Coffey | John Axford | Dee Gordon | Adam Eaton | Rajai Davis | Brad Ziegler & Tyler Clippard | Buster Posey, David Price & Anthony Rizzo

CELEBS: Kurt Busch | Bill Nye | HQ’s Scott Rogowsky | Mr. Belding | Alyssa Milano | Josh Duhamel | Joel McHale

ETC: Chris “Mad Dog” Russo | Josh Kusnick | Jeff Passan | Ken Kendrick

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– – – – – –

Mike Oz is a biographer at Beast Sports. Contact him at mikeozstew@yahoo.com or chase him on Twitter!

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