Tips to Build Relationship Trust…When Your Partner Has NOT Cheated

Tips to Build Relationship Trust…When Your Partner Has NOT Cheated

By Susie and Otto Collins

We’ve written articles and e-books about how to rebuild trust after infidelity and cheating. But, what about the relationships in which there is mistrust and there’s NEVER been cheating?

If you find yourself questioning what your mate tells you and you can’t figure out why, it’s possible that there’s weak trust in your love relationship or marriage.

You (and your partner too) might call yourself “crazy,” “deluded,” “paranoid” and “jealous” to have these hesitations, doubts and worries, but this kind of dismissive talk won’t help reverse this dangerous situation.

And it IS a dangerous situation.

Trust is one of those essential building blocks of a love relationship or marriage. Without strong and healthy trust between you and your mate, there is a shaky foundation upon which your connection is relying.

This shaky foundation can be easily jarred by a misunderstanding, an argument or an assumption. As a result, your whole relationship can come toppling over.

Recognizing that there is weak trust between you and your partner is an important first step. Here are some tips to help you build trust and create a strong and healthy foundation from which you two can create the kind of future together that you desire…

#1: Be completely honest.

As honest as you think you have been with your partner, this may simply not be true.

We’re not calling you a liar, but we’re betting that there are crucial times when you’ve remained silent when you really had something to say or you told a “white lie” because you wanted to keep your mate happy.

There is a big difference between lies to hide an affair and a “white lie” about how you really feel about your mate’s parents, for example. But, even the “white lies” and silences can damage trust.

Start out by being honest with yourself about your partner and your relationship. Allow yourself to feel what you are feeling, even if it’s not how your believe you are “supposed” to feel.

Next, when communicating with your partner, be honest. This doesn’t necessarily mean that you need to tell her that she looks fat in a particular outfit or that you can tell that he is losing a lot of hair as he ages.

You can be genuine and honest AND also be loving and maintain your connection. Every time you are honest with your partner, this will bolster trust between you two.

#2: Clean up your past.

Just about every one of us holds on to memories of the past. These memories can influence the way that we approach our current situations– this includes our relationships.

If you experienced infidelity or lying in a past relationship (even if it was not a love relationship), those doubts and that hurt can carry over into your present-day relationship. You might find yourself reacting more intensely to some situation with your partner than you intended…and this is often because you are reacting more to the past than to the present.

Take steps to make completions with your past. Heal those old emotional wounds and free yourself to be here and now and building trust with your partner.

#3: Watch your expectations.

Most of us also have expectations about how things will go in our lives. On a very basic level, most of us expect that when we go to sleep at night, we will awake in the morning. We expect the sun to rise and then set in the evening.

We also tend to have expectations about ourselves, our relationship and our partner. These expectations are sometimes linked to past experiences, but they are also often a residual effect of all kinds of thoughts, beliefs and experiences that you’ve had over the course of your entire life.

For example, if you’ve looked around you and concluded that “all men eventually cheat,” “all women flirt” or “I always attract losers,” you’re probably going to apply that expectation to your partner– even if you also try to convince yourself that he or she is the exception.

Take a look at your expectations– both generalizing ones and specific ones about yourself or your own mate– and question them. Really interrogate these expectations (and not your partner). If you can’t know that the particular expectation is absolutely true, consider letting it go.

The more that you can be fully present and open to what’s truly going on in your relationship, the better chance you have to build trust and keep it strong.

 

 

Find out how to reverse relationship habits, like mistrust, with Susie and Otto Collins’ free report: “Relationship Reverse Report.”

Susie and Otto Collins are relationship coaches and authors who help couples communicate, connect and create the passionate relationships they desire. They have written these e-books and programs: Magic Relationship Words, Relationship Trust Turnaround, No More Jealousy and Stop Talking on Eggshells among many others.

 

How to Find True Love – You Don’t Need to Sit and Wait, Let’s Build a Strategy

How to Find True Love – You Don’t Need to Sit and Wait, Let’s Build a Strategy

We all want to love and be loved. Being in a loving relationship is what makes most of us happy and gives life meaning, according to happiness research.

So why are you not there? The best way to find true love is to understand why you do not have it today. What are you doing wrong?

1. Be honest with yourself. What do you think that you can learn from past flings and relationships? How can you improve your way of thinking, being or acting, to find love? Write down at least ten things you wish you were, had, did or thought.
2. Where is it going wrong for you? In what stage of the search for love do you fail? Can´t you find a date? Don´t you get a second? Do you break up after a week, a month, a year? Why do you think this stage is not working?
3. When you have identified where it “goes wrong” you can start your journey to find true love by working on yourself and your issues. It´s nothing wrong with you, but probably with something you do. What can that be?
4. Ask friends and family to help you and accept their opinions. They want your best and if you let them tell you the truth without being angry at them, you will receive the gift of insights.
5. Make sure you are really ready and healed since past relationship. You need to be open for love to get love. If you are still upset with your ex or have feelings for someone else, it is impossible to let others in.
6. Visualise and start dreaming about your true love. What kind of relationship do you want and why? How do you wish to feel? What do you deserve? What will make you happy? Put light in the picture. It is important that you are sure this is possible. Pray to God or the Love Energy.
7. Live in love every day. Be a happy, smiling and loving person. Be nice to the world and people around you. The more you give, the more you get.

Carolin Dahlman is a Swedish Love Coach, guiding people to fall in love and stay in love. She works with individuals to help them be strong, confident and happy – to be magnets for love. Her website: http://www.coaching2love.com or specific help on how to find true love: http://www.howtofindtrueloveadvice.com

Related Replicant Urbanism Articles

BRAC brings upheaval, opportunity to San Antonio 090812

BRAC brings upheaval, opportunity to San Antonio 090812

PHOTO CAPTION: David Ybarra, a laborer with RKJ Construction, works with cement on Building 2265. (Photo by Rob McIlvaine, FMWRC Public Affairs)

www.armymwr.com

BRAC brings upheaval, opportunity to San Antonio 090812

By Rob McIlvaine
FMWRC Public Affairs

FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas – Construction on the Installation Management Command campus at Fort Sam Houston is raising the dust with four buildings under complete renovation, one getting an addition, two being built from the ground up, and 2,400 people moving into new offices during the next two years.

“It’s been a year-long process to get all the building plans developed and the approvals granted for all of these projects,” IMCOM Transformation Office Program Manager Roy “R.J.” Holley said.

With one of the buildings half completed, and contracts being awarded for the rest, Fort Sam, as it is colloquially known, continues to grow.

Construction, however, is not new to San Antonio, known as Military City USA. From the early days of Spanish exploration and the transformation of the Alamo, to providing the cutting edge in battlefield healthcare training, San Antonio’s history is closely linked to military history.

However, the Base Realignment and Closure activities scheduled to occur in San Antonio through September 2011 could arguably be one of the city’s largest economic development projects.

San Antonio’s four military facilities – Lackland and Randolph Air Force Bases, Camp Bullis and Fort Sam Houston – are expected to receive 4,886 new personnel, 5,500 Family members, 9,000 additional students, along with $2.1 billion in construction.

San Antonio is one of 12 locations worldwide where Department of Defense sites are combining to form joint bases. Under the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure Joint Basing plan for San Antonio, installation support functions at Fort Sam Houston will combine with those at Randolph and Lackland AFBs to support what will be the largest customer-based organization in the Department of Defense when completed in 2011.

Restoration of historic structures on Fort Sam Houston will provide administrative space for about 3,000 military personnel and civilian employees. They will support a variety of realigned agencies and commands, including the Installation Management Command, the Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation Command, and the Army Environmental Command. The Mission and Installation Contracting Command and the Network Enterprise Technology Command, including the 106th Signal Brigade, also will be stationed there.

All told, BRAC is expected to bring 9,000 employees to Fort Sam Houston.

These renovation projects include about two dozen structures, many of which are more than 75 years old and several that are more than a century old. As federal historic renovation efforts, the projects are within the National Historic Preservation Act parameters.

“One of the nicest things about these historical structures built in the 1930s as regimental barracks is the open balconies that will allow people to move between offices by going outside on the second and third floors,” Holley said about IMCOM headquarters. “The balconies face the summertime prevailing winds, allowing them to be nice and cool. A lot of business will probably be conducted on those balconies.”

If there is insufficient room on the balconies, the buildings are designed with 30 percent more meeting rooms and conference areas than normal design guidelines.

These historic structures are arranged in the shape of a square with a new 168,000 square foot IMCOM headquarters being constructed in the middle.

Holley oversees renovation of three buildings for IMCOM – including one for FMWRC and another for AEC. He also oversees construction of a fourth building for IMCOM, to be located inside the four outlying buildings on campus, the renovation of the old Sam Houston Theater for Army Entertainment Division, and construction of the MWR Academy.

Building 2264, the future home of Family and MWR Command, will begin renovation this November and be completed by May 2011.

In the meantime, 68 personnel, the majority of whom are relocating from the National Capital Region, will work at the Fort Sam Houston Community Club until the permanent lease space located off base becomes available in September.

IMCOM personnel moving to Fort Sam Houston this summer will experience some difficulty in accomplishing their daily work activities. But in two years the enormous amount of construction and the resulting consolidation of various departments will streamline workflow, reduce stress and contribute to an improved quality of life for Soldiers and Families.

"We’re having growing pains, of course," said Bill Bradner, deputy Public Affairs officer and spokesperson for the Family and MWR Command. "Adapting to split operations is a challenge, and working through the IT issues has been frustrating, at times. But every day we’re getting smarter, and developing solutions to those challenges.

"We’re looking forward to moving to the leased space this fall. Right now some of us are working on folding tables, taking our files and computers home every night, even sharing phones, copiers and printers. Moving to office space and establishing a more permanent infrastructure will be a huge step forward. Of course, there will be growing pains then, too… but the lessons we’ve learned making the move from Alexandria to Fort Sam should serve us well as we move into the leased space," Bradner said.

According to Bill Stickles, acting director of MWR Facilities, the new working spaces were based on the needs of each directorate.

“We were bound by certain building requirements,” Stickles noted, “but we wanted to be sure each directorate would not be split up on different floors. This was achieved through the efforts of our designer, Haimanot Abbit.”

As of August 2009, the renovation of building 2265, which will house the Fort Sam Houston Directorate of Information Management and Headquarters IMCOM G6, is halfway completed, with a June 2010 target for completion.

Building 2266, which will house Headquarters IMCOM G1, G5 and IG, began renovation in July, with expected completion by May 2011. It should be mission-ready 60 days later.

Building 2263, home to Army Environmental Command, will begin renovation this October with expected completion by 2011.

Those reporting for duty with AEC this year and next will work in Building 2000, beginning this December, until their new space is ready. This structure was built in 1908 to serve as the installation’s new hospital, replacing the hospital that had been constructed in 1886.

“Each of the buildings has basements where conference rooms, training rooms, locker rooms with showers, and classrooms are being built,” Holley said.

The three-story structure to be built in the middle of these buildings, on the original parade ground, will house the IMCOM Command Group, numbering about 900 people, bringing the total number to 2,400 moving onto the IMCOM campus. Construction will begin in November, with completion by June 2011.

Although not visible when driving by the campus, it will be historically accurate and match the other buildings. A special Army Alternate Procedures agreement outlines more specific management practices to ensure the visual character of the buildings is maintained. Under this agreement, project teams consult regularly with the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and the Texas Historical Commission.

“Renovation projects like these require extraordinary effort because intricate architectural features must be preserved to achieve an appearance that is true to the original designs,” said David Thomas, director of the Joint Program Management Office, which is overseeing the San Antonio BRAC construction and renovation program. “Extra care and diligence are also necessary in carrying out the work because of the delicate state of some of these buildings.”

All of the historic structures require extensive rehabilitation to become suitable for their new tenants. In most cases, existing interior partitions, electrical wiring, plumbing, climate control systems, and interior and exterior lighting fixtures need to be replaced. Stairways, ceilings, wooden floors, structural roof members, interior and exterior doors and windows are also being repaired, refinished or replaced.

“These buildings were meant to last,” Holley said. “The original clay tile roofs will remain as they are, and the stucco on the outside walls, built with cinderblock and brick, only needed a paint job.”

During the 1970s, the Army remodeled the structures as two-man rooms from traditional barracks. The rest of the renovation of these Mediterranean-style buildings will help meet anti-terrorism/force protection requirements, such as blast-proof windows designed to appear as the originals, and the addition of fiberglass “band aids” to the concrete floors designed for “progressive collapse,” among others.

Fort Sam Houston, with construction beginning in 1876, is the ninth oldest Army installation with the most historic structures of any active military installation in America.

“The whole complex is a cultural conservation district,” Holley said. “In addition, nice micro parks will be landscaped between the buildings with Texas vegetation local to this San Antonio river basin, such as Lantana that grows six feet high with yellow flowers, lots of cactus, desert palms, and native live oaks.”

To conserve water, irrigation for the plants will be provided by an underground cistern that captures rain water.

“But the crown jewel will be the renovation of Building 2270 – the Fort Sam Houston Theatre, to its original grandeur,” Holley said. “Built in 1935, this movie theatre is the first one the Army built in the United States.

“On the inside, it looks a whole like the Warner Brothers’ theaters built around the country in the early 1900s. After completion, we’ll hang original film posters throughout,” Holley said. “Even the ticket booth in the front will have a mannequin inside, ready to take your money for the latest show.”

A portion of theatre will be overhauled and the end product will feature a three-story structure with an 80-foot “fly tower” that will accommodate the raising and lowering of stage sets. The first floor will extend the stage, which only will be used as a rehearsal hall. The other floors will house offices and recording studios.

The 1,100-seat theater will be reduced to an 800-seat theater to allow the balcony to hold lighting and sound equipment. A nearby warehouse will be used for construction of sets, theater maintenance and equipment storage.

The MWR Academy will be built in a field behind the IMCOM complex, on the other side of Wilson Street, with parking for 500.

For the entire IMCOM campus there will be 2,100 parking spaces, mostly located along three blocks of Stanley Road, which runs parallel to Wilson.
“All new construction in this campus within the San Antonio river basin will appear the same, architecturally, so there’ll be no mistaking where IMCOM is located,” Holley said.

In the fall of 2011, after the dust settles from yet another upheaval at Fort Sam, the City of San Antonio, Bexar County, and the military not only will benefit from a strengthened economy and revitalized neighborhoods, but those who have moved into this historical military city as a result of BRAC will find a sense of community and revitalized spirit.

According to Bradner, the move back onto Fort Sam in 2011 will unite “our Family and we’ll be working side by side supporting the Army Family.
“We’ll probably face a number of challenges during that transition, too, but the end result will be greatly improved efficiency and smoother operations across the board,” Bradner said.

Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

ks 101015

Posted by familymwr on 2010-10-15 19:43:26

Tagged: , Builders , IMCOM , Headquarters , Building , David Ybarra , laborer , cement , Quality , Assurance , Details , Corps , Engineers , RKJ , Construction , build , 2265 , Fort , Sam , Houston , Texas , U.S. , Army , Family , Morale , Welfare , Recreation , Command , FMWRC , MWR

BRAC brings upheaval, opportunity to San Antonio 090812

BRAC brings upheaval, opportunity to San Antonio 090812

PHOTO CAPTION: RJ Holley, Program Manager for Facilities, IMCOM Transformation Office, discusses new blast-proof windows with Troy Alexander, superintendant with RKJ Construction, the contractor on Building 2265, the future home of Headquarters, IMCOM G6. (Photo by Rob McIlvaine, FMWRC Public Affairs)

www.armymwr.com

BRAC brings upheaval, opportunity to San Antonio 090812

By Rob McIlvaine
FMWRC Public Affairs

FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas – Construction on the Installation Management Command campus at Fort Sam Houston is raising the dust with four buildings under complete renovation, one getting an addition, two being built from the ground up, and 2,400 people moving into new offices during the next two years.

“It’s been a year-long process to get all the building plans developed and the approvals granted for all of these projects,” IMCOM Transformation Office Program Manager Roy “R.J.” Holley said.

With one of the buildings half completed, and contracts being awarded for the rest, Fort Sam, as it is colloquially known, continues to grow.

Construction, however, is not new to San Antonio, known as Military City USA. From the early days of Spanish exploration and the transformation of the Alamo, to providing the cutting edge in battlefield healthcare training, San Antonio’s history is closely linked to military history.

However, the Base Realignment and Closure activities scheduled to occur in San Antonio through September 2011 could arguably be one of the city’s largest economic development projects.

San Antonio’s four military facilities – Lackland and Randolph Air Force Bases, Camp Bullis and Fort Sam Houston – are expected to receive 4,886 new personnel, 5,500 Family members, 9,000 additional students, along with $2.1 billion in construction.

San Antonio is one of 12 locations worldwide where Department of Defense sites are combining to form joint bases. Under the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure Joint Basing plan for San Antonio, installation support functions at Fort Sam Houston will combine with those at Randolph and Lackland AFBs to support what will be the largest customer-based organization in the Department of Defense when completed in 2011.

Restoration of historic structures on Fort Sam Houston will provide administrative space for about 3,000 military personnel and civilian employees. They will support a variety of realigned agencies and commands, including the Installation Management Command, the Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation Command, and the Army Environmental Command. The Mission and Installation Contracting Command and the Network Enterprise Technology Command, including the 106th Signal Brigade, also will be stationed there.

All told, BRAC is expected to bring 9,000 employees to Fort Sam Houston.

These renovation projects include about two dozen structures, many of which are more than 75 years old and several that are more than a century old. As federal historic renovation efforts, the projects are within the National Historic Preservation Act parameters.

“One of the nicest things about these historical structures built in the 1930s as regimental barracks is the open balconies that will allow people to move between offices by going outside on the second and third floors,” Holley said about IMCOM headquarters. “The balconies face the summertime prevailing winds, allowing them to be nice and cool. A lot of business will probably be conducted on those balconies.”

If there is insufficient room on the balconies, the buildings are designed with 30 percent more meeting rooms and conference areas than normal design guidelines.

These historic structures are arranged in the shape of a square with a new 168,000 square foot IMCOM headquarters being constructed in the middle.

Holley oversees renovation of three buildings for IMCOM – including one for FMWRC and another for AEC. He also oversees construction of a fourth building for IMCOM, to be located inside the four outlying buildings on campus, the renovation of the old Sam Houston Theater for Army Entertainment Division, and construction of the MWR Academy.

Building 2264, the future home of Family and MWR Command, will begin renovation this November and be completed by May 2011.

In the meantime, 68 personnel, the majority of whom are relocating from the National Capital Region, will work at the Fort Sam Houston Community Club until the permanent lease space located off base becomes available in September.

IMCOM personnel moving to Fort Sam Houston this summer will experience some difficulty in accomplishing their daily work activities. But in two years the enormous amount of construction and the resulting consolidation of various departments will streamline workflow, reduce stress and contribute to an improved quality of life for Soldiers and Families.

"We’re having growing pains, of course," said Bill Bradner, deputy Public Affairs officer and spokesperson for the Family and MWR Command. "Adapting to split operations is a challenge, and working through the IT issues has been frustrating, at times. But every day we’re getting smarter, and developing solutions to those challenges.

"We’re looking forward to moving to the leased space this fall. Right now some of us are working on folding tables, taking our files and computers home every night, even sharing phones, copiers and printers. Moving to office space and establishing a more permanent infrastructure will be a huge step forward. Of course, there will be growing pains then, too… but the lessons we’ve learned making the move from Alexandria to Fort Sam should serve us well as we move into the leased space," Bradner said.

According to Bill Stickles, acting director of MWR Facilities, the new working spaces were based on the needs of each directorate.

“We were bound by certain building requirements,” Stickles noted, “but we wanted to be sure each directorate would not be split up on different floors. This was achieved through the efforts of our designer, Haimanot Abbit.”

As of August 2009, the renovation of building 2265, which will house the Fort Sam Houston Directorate of Information Management and Headquarters IMCOM G6, is halfway completed, with a June 2010 target for completion.

Building 2266, which will house Headquarters IMCOM G1, G5 and IG, began renovation in July, with expected completion by May 2011. It should be mission-ready 60 days later.

Building 2263, home to Army Environmental Command, will begin renovation this October with expected completion by 2011.

Those reporting for duty with AEC this year and next will work in Building 2000, beginning this December, until their new space is ready. This structure was built in 1908 to serve as the installation’s new hospital, replacing the hospital that had been constructed in 1886.

“Each of the buildings has basements where conference rooms, training rooms, locker rooms with showers, and classrooms are being built,” Holley said.

The three-story structure to be built in the middle of these buildings, on the original parade ground, will house the IMCOM Command Group, numbering about 900 people, bringing the total number to 2,400 moving onto the IMCOM campus. Construction will begin in November, with completion by June 2011.

Although not visible when driving by the campus, it will be historically accurate and match the other buildings. A special Army Alternate Procedures agreement outlines more specific management practices to ensure the visual character of the buildings is maintained. Under this agreement, project teams consult regularly with the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and the Texas Historical Commission.

“Renovation projects like these require extraordinary effort because intricate architectural features must be preserved to achieve an appearance that is true to the original designs,” said David Thomas, director of the Joint Program Management Office, which is overseeing the San Antonio BRAC construction and renovation program. “Extra care and diligence are also necessary in carrying out the work because of the delicate state of some of these buildings.”

All of the historic structures require extensive rehabilitation to become suitable for their new tenants. In most cases, existing interior partitions, electrical wiring, plumbing, climate control systems, and interior and exterior lighting fixtures need to be replaced. Stairways, ceilings, wooden floors, structural roof members, interior and exterior doors and windows are also being repaired, refinished or replaced.

“These buildings were meant to last,” Holley said. “The original clay tile roofs will remain as they are, and the stucco on the outside walls, built with cinderblock and brick, only needed a paint job.”

During the 1970s, the Army remodeled the structures as two-man rooms from traditional barracks. The rest of the renovation of these Mediterranean-style buildings will help meet anti-terrorism/force protection requirements, such as blast-proof windows designed to appear as the originals, and the addition of fiberglass “band aids” to the concrete floors designed for “progressive collapse,” among others.

Fort Sam Houston, with construction beginning in 1876, is the ninth oldest Army installation with the most historic structures of any active military installation in America.

“The whole complex is a cultural conservation district,” Holley said. “In addition, nice micro parks will be landscaped between the buildings with Texas vegetation local to this San Antonio river basin, such as Lantana that grows six feet high with yellow flowers, lots of cactus, desert palms, and native live oaks.”

To conserve water, irrigation for the plants will be provided by an underground cistern that captures rain water.

“But the crown jewel will be the renovation of Building 2270 – the Fort Sam Houston Theatre, to its original grandeur,” Holley said. “Built in 1935, this movie theatre is the first one the Army built in the United States.

“On the inside, it looks a whole like the Warner Brothers’ theaters built around the country in the early 1900s. After completion, we’ll hang original film posters throughout,” Holley said. “Even the ticket booth in the front will have a mannequin inside, ready to take your money for the latest show.”

A portion of theatre will be overhauled and the end product will feature a three-story structure with an 80-foot “fly tower” that will accommodate the raising and lowering of stage sets. The first floor will extend the stage, which only will be used as a rehearsal hall. The other floors will house offices and recording studios.

The 1,100-seat theater will be reduced to an 800-seat theater to allow the balcony to hold lighting and sound equipment. A nearby warehouse will be used for construction of sets, theater maintenance and equipment storage.

The MWR Academy will be built in a field behind the IMCOM complex, on the other side of Wilson Street, with parking for 500.

For the entire IMCOM campus there will be 2,100 parking spaces, mostly located along three blocks of Stanley Road, which runs parallel to Wilson.
“All new construction in this campus within the San Antonio river basin will appear the same, architecturally, so there’ll be no mistaking where IMCOM is located,” Holley said.

In the fall of 2011, after the dust settles from yet another upheaval at Fort Sam, the City of San Antonio, Bexar County, and the military not only will benefit from a strengthened economy and revitalized neighborhoods, but those who have moved into this historical military city as a result of BRAC will find a sense of community and revitalized spirit.

According to Bradner, the move back onto Fort Sam in 2011 will unite “our Family and we’ll be working side by side supporting the Army Family.
“We’ll probably face a number of challenges during that transition, too, but the end result will be greatly improved efficiency and smoother operations across the board,” Bradner said.

Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

ks 101015

Posted by familymwr on 2010-10-15 19:43:26

Tagged: , Builders , IMCOM , Transformation , Office , Blast , Proof , windows , Troy Alexander , Future , Home , G6 , Headquarters , Building , RJ Holley , Facilities , Corps , Engineers , RKJ , Construction , build , cinder , block , wall , 2265 , Fort , Sam , Houston , Texas , U.S. , Army , Family , Morale , Welfare , Recreation , Command , FMWRC , MWR

BRAC brings upheaval, opportunity to San Antonio 090812

BRAC brings upheaval, opportunity to San Antonio 090812

PHOTO CAPTION: Fort Sam Houston Theatre, although slated for expansion in the rear, will remain with its original façade and clay tile roof. (Photo courtesy of Army Corps of Engineers)

www.armymwr.com

BRAC brings upheaval, opportunity to San Antonio 090812

By Rob McIlvaine
FMWRC Public Affairs

FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas – Construction on the Installation Management Command campus at Fort Sam Houston is raising the dust with four buildings under complete renovation, one getting an addition, two being built from the ground up, and 2,400 people moving into new offices during the next two years.

“It’s been a year-long process to get all the building plans developed and the approvals granted for all of these projects,” IMCOM Transformation Office Program Manager Roy “R.J.” Holley said.

With one of the buildings half completed, and contracts being awarded for the rest, Fort Sam, as it is colloquially known, continues to grow.

Construction, however, is not new to San Antonio, known as Military City USA. From the early days of Spanish exploration and the transformation of the Alamo, to providing the cutting edge in battlefield healthcare training, San Antonio’s history is closely linked to military history.

However, the Base Realignment and Closure activities scheduled to occur in San Antonio through September 2011 could arguably be one of the city’s largest economic development projects.

San Antonio’s four military facilities – Lackland and Randolph Air Force Bases, Camp Bullis and Fort Sam Houston – are expected to receive 4,886 new personnel, 5,500 Family members, 9,000 additional students, along with $2.1 billion in construction.

San Antonio is one of 12 locations worldwide where Department of Defense sites are combining to form joint bases. Under the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure Joint Basing plan for San Antonio, installation support functions at Fort Sam Houston will combine with those at Randolph and Lackland AFBs to support what will be the largest customer-based organization in the Department of Defense when completed in 2011.

Restoration of historic structures on Fort Sam Houston will provide administrative space for about 3,000 military personnel and civilian employees. They will support a variety of realigned agencies and commands, including the Installation Management Command, the Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation Command, and the Army Environmental Command. The Mission and Installation Contracting Command and the Network Enterprise Technology Command, including the 106th Signal Brigade, also will be stationed there.

All told, BRAC is expected to bring 9,000 employees to Fort Sam Houston.

These renovation projects include about two dozen structures, many of which are more than 75 years old and several that are more than a century old. As federal historic renovation efforts, the projects are within the National Historic Preservation Act parameters.

“One of the nicest things about these historical structures built in the 1930s as regimental barracks is the open balconies that will allow people to move between offices by going outside on the second and third floors,” Holley said about IMCOM headquarters. “The balconies face the summertime prevailing winds, allowing them to be nice and cool. A lot of business will probably be conducted on those balconies.”

If there is insufficient room on the balconies, the buildings are designed with 30 percent more meeting rooms and conference areas than normal design guidelines.

These historic structures are arranged in the shape of a square with a new 168,000 square foot IMCOM headquarters being constructed in the middle.

Holley oversees renovation of three buildings for IMCOM – including one for FMWRC and another for AEC. He also oversees construction of a fourth building for IMCOM, to be located inside the four outlying buildings on campus, the renovation of the old Sam Houston Theater for Army Entertainment Division, and construction of the MWR Academy.

Building 2264, the future home of Family and MWR Command, will begin renovation this November and be completed by May 2011.

In the meantime, 68 personnel, the majority of whom are relocating from the National Capital Region, will work at the Fort Sam Houston Community Club until the permanent lease space located off base becomes available in September.

IMCOM personnel moving to Fort Sam Houston this summer will experience some difficulty in accomplishing their daily work activities. But in two years the enormous amount of construction and the resulting consolidation of various departments will streamline workflow, reduce stress and contribute to an improved quality of life for Soldiers and Families.

"We’re having growing pains, of course," said Bill Bradner, deputy Public Affairs officer and spokesperson for the Family and MWR Command. "Adapting to split operations is a challenge, and working through the IT issues has been frustrating, at times. But every day we’re getting smarter, and developing solutions to those challenges.

"We’re looking forward to moving to the leased space this fall. Right now some of us are working on folding tables, taking our files and computers home every night, even sharing phones, copiers and printers. Moving to office space and establishing a more permanent infrastructure will be a huge step forward. Of course, there will be growing pains then, too… but the lessons we’ve learned making the move from Alexandria to Fort Sam should serve us well as we move into the leased space," Bradner said.

According to Bill Stickles, acting director of MWR Facilities, the new working spaces were based on the needs of each directorate.

“We were bound by certain building requirements,” Stickles noted, “but we wanted to be sure each directorate would not be split up on different floors. This was achieved through the efforts of our designer, Haimanot Abbit.”

As of August 2009, the renovation of building 2265, which will house the Fort Sam Houston Directorate of Information Management and Headquarters IMCOM G6, is halfway completed, with a June 2010 target for completion.

Building 2266, which will house Headquarters IMCOM G1, G5 and IG, began renovation in July, with expected completion by May 2011. It should be mission-ready 60 days later.

Building 2263, home to Army Environmental Command, will begin renovation this October with expected completion by 2011.

Those reporting for duty with AEC this year and next will work in Building 2000, beginning this December, until their new space is ready. This structure was built in 1908 to serve as the installation’s new hospital, replacing the hospital that had been constructed in 1886.

“Each of the buildings has basements where conference rooms, training rooms, locker rooms with showers, and classrooms are being built,” Holley said.

The three-story structure to be built in the middle of these buildings, on the original parade ground, will house the IMCOM Command Group, numbering about 900 people, bringing the total number to 2,400 moving onto the IMCOM campus. Construction will begin in November, with completion by June 2011.

Although not visible when driving by the campus, it will be historically accurate and match the other buildings. A special Army Alternate Procedures agreement outlines more specific management practices to ensure the visual character of the buildings is maintained. Under this agreement, project teams consult regularly with the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and the Texas Historical Commission.

“Renovation projects like these require extraordinary effort because intricate architectural features must be preserved to achieve an appearance that is true to the original designs,” said David Thomas, director of the Joint Program Management Office, which is overseeing the San Antonio BRAC construction and renovation program. “Extra care and diligence are also necessary in carrying out the work because of the delicate state of some of these buildings.”

All of the historic structures require extensive rehabilitation to become suitable for their new tenants. In most cases, existing interior partitions, electrical wiring, plumbing, climate control systems, and interior and exterior lighting fixtures need to be replaced. Stairways, ceilings, wooden floors, structural roof members, interior and exterior doors and windows are also being repaired, refinished or replaced.

“These buildings were meant to last,” Holley said. “The original clay tile roofs will remain as they are, and the stucco on the outside walls, built with cinderblock and brick, only needed a paint job.”

During the 1970s, the Army remodeled the structures as two-man rooms from traditional barracks. The rest of the renovation of these Mediterranean-style buildings will help meet anti-terrorism/force protection requirements, such as blast-proof windows designed to appear as the originals, and the addition of fiberglass “band aids” to the concrete floors designed for “progressive collapse,” among others.

Fort Sam Houston, with construction beginning in 1876, is the ninth oldest Army installation with the most historic structures of any active military installation in America.

“The whole complex is a cultural conservation district,” Holley said. “In addition, nice micro parks will be landscaped between the buildings with Texas vegetation local to this San Antonio river basin, such as Lantana that grows six feet high with yellow flowers, lots of cactus, desert palms, and native live oaks.”

To conserve water, irrigation for the plants will be provided by an underground cistern that captures rain water.

“But the crown jewel will be the renovation of Building 2270 – the Fort Sam Houston Theatre, to its original grandeur,” Holley said. “Built in 1935, this movie theatre is the first one the Army built in the United States.

“On the inside, it looks a whole like the Warner Brothers’ theaters built around the country in the early 1900s. After completion, we’ll hang original film posters throughout,” Holley said. “Even the ticket booth in the front will have a mannequin inside, ready to take your money for the latest show.”

A portion of theatre will be overhauled and the end product will feature a three-story structure with an 80-foot “fly tower” that will accommodate the raising and lowering of stage sets. The first floor will extend the stage, which only will be used as a rehearsal hall. The other floors will house offices and recording studios.

The 1,100-seat theater will be reduced to an 800-seat theater to allow the balcony to hold lighting and sound equipment. A nearby warehouse will be used for construction of sets, theater maintenance and equipment storage.

The MWR Academy will be built in a field behind the IMCOM complex, on the other side of Wilson Street, with parking for 500.

For the entire IMCOM campus there will be 2,100 parking spaces, mostly located along three blocks of Stanley Road, which runs parallel to Wilson.
“All new construction in this campus within the San Antonio river basin will appear the same, architecturally, so there’ll be no mistaking where IMCOM is located,” Holley said.

In the fall of 2011, after the dust settles from yet another upheaval at Fort Sam, the City of San Antonio, Bexar County, and the military not only will benefit from a strengthened economy and revitalized neighborhoods, but those who have moved into this historical military city as a result of BRAC will find a sense of community and revitalized spirit.

According to Bradner, the move back onto Fort Sam in 2011 will unite “our Family and we’ll be working side by side supporting the Army Family.
“We’ll probably face a number of challenges during that transition, too, but the end result will be greatly improved efficiency and smoother operations across the board,” Bradner said.

Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

ks 101015

Posted by familymwr on 2010-10-15 19:43:25

Tagged: , Builders , IMCOM , Headquarters , Building , laborer , cement , Quality , Assurance , Details , Corps , Engineers , RKJ , Construction , build , 2265 , Clay , Tile , Roof , Theatre , Fort , Sam , Houston , Texas , U.S. , Army , Family , Morale , Welfare , Recreation , Command , FMWRC , MWR

BRAC brings upheaval, opportunity to San Antonio 090812

BRAC brings upheaval, opportunity to San Antonio 090812

PHOTO CAPTION: Gilbert Viera, a laborer with RKJ Construction, sweeps the entranceway at the loading dock at Building 2265. (Photo by Rob McIlvaine, FMWRC Public Affairs)

www.armymwr.com

BRAC brings upheaval, opportunity to San Antonio 090812

By Rob McIlvaine
FMWRC Public Affairs

FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas – Construction on the Installation Management Command campus at Fort Sam Houston is raising the dust with four buildings under complete renovation, one getting an addition, two being built from the ground up, and 2,400 people moving into new offices during the next two years.

“It’s been a year-long process to get all the building plans developed and the approvals granted for all of these projects,” IMCOM Transformation Office Program Manager Roy “R.J.” Holley said.

With one of the buildings half completed, and contracts being awarded for the rest, Fort Sam, as it is colloquially known, continues to grow.

Construction, however, is not new to San Antonio, known as Military City USA. From the early days of Spanish exploration and the transformation of the Alamo, to providing the cutting edge in battlefield healthcare training, San Antonio’s history is closely linked to military history.

However, the Base Realignment and Closure activities scheduled to occur in San Antonio through September 2011 could arguably be one of the city’s largest economic development projects.

San Antonio’s four military facilities – Lackland and Randolph Air Force Bases, Camp Bullis and Fort Sam Houston – are expected to receive 4,886 new personnel, 5,500 Family members, 9,000 additional students, along with $2.1 billion in construction.

San Antonio is one of 12 locations worldwide where Department of Defense sites are combining to form joint bases. Under the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure Joint Basing plan for San Antonio, installation support functions at Fort Sam Houston will combine with those at Randolph and Lackland AFBs to support what will be the largest customer-based organization in the Department of Defense when completed in 2011.

Restoration of historic structures on Fort Sam Houston will provide administrative space for about 3,000 military personnel and civilian employees. They will support a variety of realigned agencies and commands, including the Installation Management Command, the Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation Command, and the Army Environmental Command. The Mission and Installation Contracting Command and the Network Enterprise Technology Command, including the 106th Signal Brigade, also will be stationed there.

All told, BRAC is expected to bring 9,000 employees to Fort Sam Houston.

These renovation projects include about two dozen structures, many of which are more than 75 years old and several that are more than a century old. As federal historic renovation efforts, the projects are within the National Historic Preservation Act parameters.

“One of the nicest things about these historical structures built in the 1930s as regimental barracks is the open balconies that will allow people to move between offices by going outside on the second and third floors,” Holley said about IMCOM headquarters. “The balconies face the summertime prevailing winds, allowing them to be nice and cool. A lot of business will probably be conducted on those balconies.”

If there is insufficient room on the balconies, the buildings are designed with 30 percent more meeting rooms and conference areas than normal design guidelines.

These historic structures are arranged in the shape of a square with a new 168,000 square foot IMCOM headquarters being constructed in the middle.

Holley oversees renovation of three buildings for IMCOM – including one for FMWRC and another for AEC. He also oversees construction of a fourth building for IMCOM, to be located inside the four outlying buildings on campus, the renovation of the old Sam Houston Theater for Army Entertainment Division, and construction of the MWR Academy.

Building 2264, the future home of Family and MWR Command, will begin renovation this November and be completed by May 2011.

In the meantime, 68 personnel, the majority of whom are relocating from the National Capital Region, will work at the Fort Sam Houston Community Club until the permanent lease space located off base becomes available in September.

IMCOM personnel moving to Fort Sam Houston this summer will experience some difficulty in accomplishing their daily work activities. But in two years the enormous amount of construction and the resulting consolidation of various departments will streamline workflow, reduce stress and contribute to an improved quality of life for Soldiers and Families.

"We’re having growing pains, of course," said Bill Bradner, deputy Public Affairs officer and spokesperson for the Family and MWR Command. "Adapting to split operations is a challenge, and working through the IT issues has been frustrating, at times. But every day we’re getting smarter, and developing solutions to those challenges.

"We’re looking forward to moving to the leased space this fall. Right now some of us are working on folding tables, taking our files and computers home every night, even sharing phones, copiers and printers. Moving to office space and establishing a more permanent infrastructure will be a huge step forward. Of course, there will be growing pains then, too… but the lessons we’ve learned making the move from Alexandria to Fort Sam should serve us well as we move into the leased space," Bradner said.

According to Bill Stickles, acting director of MWR Facilities, the new working spaces were based on the needs of each directorate.

“We were bound by certain building requirements,” Stickles noted, “but we wanted to be sure each directorate would not be split up on different floors. This was achieved through the efforts of our designer, Haimanot Abbit.”

As of August 2009, the renovation of building 2265, which will house the Fort Sam Houston Directorate of Information Management and Headquarters IMCOM G6, is halfway completed, with a June 2010 target for completion.

Building 2266, which will house Headquarters IMCOM G1, G5 and IG, began renovation in July, with expected completion by May 2011. It should be mission-ready 60 days later.

Building 2263, home to Army Environmental Command, will begin renovation this October with expected completion by 2011.

Those reporting for duty with AEC this year and next will work in Building 2000, beginning this December, until their new space is ready. This structure was built in 1908 to serve as the installation’s new hospital, replacing the hospital that had been constructed in 1886.

“Each of the buildings has basements where conference rooms, training rooms, locker rooms with showers, and classrooms are being built,” Holley said.

The three-story structure to be built in the middle of these buildings, on the original parade ground, will house the IMCOM Command Group, numbering about 900 people, bringing the total number to 2,400 moving onto the IMCOM campus. Construction will begin in November, with completion by June 2011.

Although not visible when driving by the campus, it will be historically accurate and match the other buildings. A special Army Alternate Procedures agreement outlines more specific management practices to ensure the visual character of the buildings is maintained. Under this agreement, project teams consult regularly with the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and the Texas Historical Commission.

“Renovation projects like these require extraordinary effort because intricate architectural features must be preserved to achieve an appearance that is true to the original designs,” said David Thomas, director of the Joint Program Management Office, which is overseeing the San Antonio BRAC construction and renovation program. “Extra care and diligence are also necessary in carrying out the work because of the delicate state of some of these buildings.”

All of the historic structures require extensive rehabilitation to become suitable for their new tenants. In most cases, existing interior partitions, electrical wiring, plumbing, climate control systems, and interior and exterior lighting fixtures need to be replaced. Stairways, ceilings, wooden floors, structural roof members, interior and exterior doors and windows are also being repaired, refinished or replaced.

“These buildings were meant to last,” Holley said. “The original clay tile roofs will remain as they are, and the stucco on the outside walls, built with cinderblock and brick, only needed a paint job.”

During the 1970s, the Army remodeled the structures as two-man rooms from traditional barracks. The rest of the renovation of these Mediterranean-style buildings will help meet anti-terrorism/force protection requirements, such as blast-proof windows designed to appear as the originals, and the addition of fiberglass “band aids” to the concrete floors designed for “progressive collapse,” among others.

Fort Sam Houston, with construction beginning in 1876, is the ninth oldest Army installation with the most historic structures of any active military installation in America.

“The whole complex is a cultural conservation district,” Holley said. “In addition, nice micro parks will be landscaped between the buildings with Texas vegetation local to this San Antonio river basin, such as Lantana that grows six feet high with yellow flowers, lots of cactus, desert palms, and native live oaks.”

To conserve water, irrigation for the plants will be provided by an underground cistern that captures rain water.

“But the crown jewel will be the renovation of Building 2270 – the Fort Sam Houston Theatre, to its original grandeur,” Holley said. “Built in 1935, this movie theatre is the first one the Army built in the United States.

“On the inside, it looks a whole like the Warner Brothers’ theaters built around the country in the early 1900s. After completion, we’ll hang original film posters throughout,” Holley said. “Even the ticket booth in the front will have a mannequin inside, ready to take your money for the latest show.”

A portion of theatre will be overhauled and the end product will feature a three-story structure with an 80-foot “fly tower” that will accommodate the raising and lowering of stage sets. The first floor will extend the stage, which only will be used as a rehearsal hall. The other floors will house offices and recording studios.

The 1,100-seat theater will be reduced to an 800-seat theater to allow the balcony to hold lighting and sound equipment. A nearby warehouse will be used for construction of sets, theater maintenance and equipment storage.

The MWR Academy will be built in a field behind the IMCOM complex, on the other side of Wilson Street, with parking for 500.

For the entire IMCOM campus there will be 2,100 parking spaces, mostly located along three blocks of Stanley Road, which runs parallel to Wilson.
“All new construction in this campus within the San Antonio river basin will appear the same, architecturally, so there’ll be no mistaking where IMCOM is located,” Holley said.

In the fall of 2011, after the dust settles from yet another upheaval at Fort Sam, the City of San Antonio, Bexar County, and the military not only will benefit from a strengthened economy and revitalized neighborhoods, but those who have moved into this historical military city as a result of BRAC will find a sense of community and revitalized spirit.

According to Bradner, the move back onto Fort Sam in 2011 will unite “our Family and we’ll be working side by side supporting the Army Family.
“We’ll probably face a number of challenges during that transition, too, but the end result will be greatly improved efficiency and smoother operations across the board,” Bradner said.

Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

ks 101015

Posted by familymwr on 2010-10-15 19:43:27

Tagged: , Builders , IMCOM , Headquarters , Building , Gilbert Viera , Quality , Assurance , Details , Corps , Engineers , RKJ , Construction , build , cinder , block , wall , 2265 , Fort , Sam , Houston , Texas , U.S. , Army , Family , Morale , Welfare , Recreation , Command , FMWRC , MWR

Cheap Build with Unused Hardware

Cheap Build with Unused Hardware

The wife’s old iMac which I bought in 2009 was slowing down and she needed an upgrade.

This cheap build has an i3-4370 linked with a Cooler Master 212 EVO. Cheap RAM from G.Skill and waiting on the Asus STRIX 960.

I know the power supply which is at 750 watts is a bit overkill, but it was just sitting there collecting dust.

It will be a cheap and a low power build because she tends to leave the computer running all day. This build is just intended for daily surfing and some gaming light gaming like Sims 4 and hopefully be able to handle Call of Duty Black Ops 3.

Not looking forward to the monthly dust cleaning due to the placement of this bad boy.

Posted by E_milTakesPics on 2015-05-13 19:42:52

Tagged: , i3 , Cooler Master , EVO , 212 , PC , Cheap , Build , Low Power , Computer , Red , LED

BRAC brings upheaval, opportunity to San Antonio 090812

BRAC brings upheaval, opportunity to San Antonio 090812

PHOTO CAPTION: Troy Alexander, superintendant with RKJ Construction, discusses the renovation with Bill Reese, quality assurance with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. (Photo by Rob McIlvaine, FMWRC Public Affairs)

www.armymwr.com

BRAC brings upheaval, opportunity to San Antonio 090812

By Rob McIlvaine
FMWRC Public Affairs

FORT SAM HOUSTON, Texas – Construction on the Installation Management Command campus at Fort Sam Houston is raising the dust with four buildings under complete renovation, one getting an addition, two being built from the ground up, and 2,400 people moving into new offices during the next two years.

“It’s been a year-long process to get all the building plans developed and the approvals granted for all of these projects,” IMCOM Transformation Office Program Manager Roy “R.J.” Holley said.

With one of the buildings half completed, and contracts being awarded for the rest, Fort Sam, as it is colloquially known, continues to grow.

Construction, however, is not new to San Antonio, known as Military City USA. From the early days of Spanish exploration and the transformation of the Alamo, to providing the cutting edge in battlefield healthcare training, San Antonio’s history is closely linked to military history.

However, the Base Realignment and Closure activities scheduled to occur in San Antonio through September 2011 could arguably be one of the city’s largest economic development projects.

San Antonio’s four military facilities – Lackland and Randolph Air Force Bases, Camp Bullis and Fort Sam Houston – are expected to receive 4,886 new personnel, 5,500 Family members, 9,000 additional students, along with $2.1 billion in construction.

San Antonio is one of 12 locations worldwide where Department of Defense sites are combining to form joint bases. Under the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure Joint Basing plan for San Antonio, installation support functions at Fort Sam Houston will combine with those at Randolph and Lackland AFBs to support what will be the largest customer-based organization in the Department of Defense when completed in 2011.

Restoration of historic structures on Fort Sam Houston will provide administrative space for about 3,000 military personnel and civilian employees. They will support a variety of realigned agencies and commands, including the Installation Management Command, the Family and Morale, Welfare and Recreation Command, and the Army Environmental Command. The Mission and Installation Contracting Command and the Network Enterprise Technology Command, including the 106th Signal Brigade, also will be stationed there.

All told, BRAC is expected to bring 9,000 employees to Fort Sam Houston.

These renovation projects include about two dozen structures, many of which are more than 75 years old and several that are more than a century old. As federal historic renovation efforts, the projects are within the National Historic Preservation Act parameters.

“One of the nicest things about these historical structures built in the 1930s as regimental barracks is the open balconies that will allow people to move between offices by going outside on the second and third floors,” Holley said about IMCOM headquarters. “The balconies face the summertime prevailing winds, allowing them to be nice and cool. A lot of business will probably be conducted on those balconies.”

If there is insufficient room on the balconies, the buildings are designed with 30 percent more meeting rooms and conference areas than normal design guidelines.

These historic structures are arranged in the shape of a square with a new 168,000 square foot IMCOM headquarters being constructed in the middle.

Holley oversees renovation of three buildings for IMCOM – including one for FMWRC and another for AEC. He also oversees construction of a fourth building for IMCOM, to be located inside the four outlying buildings on campus, the renovation of the old Sam Houston Theater for Army Entertainment Division, and construction of the MWR Academy.

Building 2264, the future home of Family and MWR Command, will begin renovation this November and be completed by May 2011.

In the meantime, 68 personnel, the majority of whom are relocating from the National Capital Region, will work at the Fort Sam Houston Community Club until the permanent lease space located off base becomes available in September.

IMCOM personnel moving to Fort Sam Houston this summer will experience some difficulty in accomplishing their daily work activities. But in two years the enormous amount of construction and the resulting consolidation of various departments will streamline workflow, reduce stress and contribute to an improved quality of life for Soldiers and Families.

"We’re having growing pains, of course," said Bill Bradner, deputy Public Affairs officer and spokesperson for the Family and MWR Command. "Adapting to split operations is a challenge, and working through the IT issues has been frustrating, at times. But every day we’re getting smarter, and developing solutions to those challenges.

"We’re looking forward to moving to the leased space this fall. Right now some of us are working on folding tables, taking our files and computers home every night, even sharing phones, copiers and printers. Moving to office space and establishing a more permanent infrastructure will be a huge step forward. Of course, there will be growing pains then, too… but the lessons we’ve learned making the move from Alexandria to Fort Sam should serve us well as we move into the leased space," Bradner said.

According to Bill Stickles, acting director of MWR Facilities, the new working spaces were based on the needs of each directorate.

“We were bound by certain building requirements,” Stickles noted, “but we wanted to be sure each directorate would not be split up on different floors. This was achieved through the efforts of our designer, Haimanot Abbit.”

As of August 2009, the renovation of building 2265, which will house the Fort Sam Houston Directorate of Information Management and Headquarters IMCOM G6, is halfway completed, with a June 2010 target for completion.

Building 2266, which will house Headquarters IMCOM G1, G5 and IG, began renovation in July, with expected completion by May 2011. It should be mission-ready 60 days later.

Building 2263, home to Army Environmental Command, will begin renovation this October with expected completion by 2011.

Those reporting for duty with AEC this year and next will work in Building 2000, beginning this December, until their new space is ready. This structure was built in 1908 to serve as the installation’s new hospital, replacing the hospital that had been constructed in 1886.

“Each of the buildings has basements where conference rooms, training rooms, locker rooms with showers, and classrooms are being built,” Holley said.

The three-story structure to be built in the middle of these buildings, on the original parade ground, will house the IMCOM Command Group, numbering about 900 people, bringing the total number to 2,400 moving onto the IMCOM campus. Construction will begin in November, with completion by June 2011.

Although not visible when driving by the campus, it will be historically accurate and match the other buildings. A special Army Alternate Procedures agreement outlines more specific management practices to ensure the visual character of the buildings is maintained. Under this agreement, project teams consult regularly with the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation and the Texas Historical Commission.

“Renovation projects like these require extraordinary effort because intricate architectural features must be preserved to achieve an appearance that is true to the original designs,” said David Thomas, director of the Joint Program Management Office, which is overseeing the San Antonio BRAC construction and renovation program. “Extra care and diligence are also necessary in carrying out the work because of the delicate state of some of these buildings.”

All of the historic structures require extensive rehabilitation to become suitable for their new tenants. In most cases, existing interior partitions, electrical wiring, plumbing, climate control systems, and interior and exterior lighting fixtures need to be replaced. Stairways, ceilings, wooden floors, structural roof members, interior and exterior doors and windows are also being repaired, refinished or replaced.

“These buildings were meant to last,” Holley said. “The original clay tile roofs will remain as they are, and the stucco on the outside walls, built with cinderblock and brick, only needed a paint job.”

During the 1970s, the Army remodeled the structures as two-man rooms from traditional barracks. The rest of the renovation of these Mediterranean-style buildings will help meet anti-terrorism/force protection requirements, such as blast-proof windows designed to appear as the originals, and the addition of fiberglass “band aids” to the concrete floors designed for “progressive collapse,” among others.

Fort Sam Houston, with construction beginning in 1876, is the ninth oldest Army installation with the most historic structures of any active military installation in America.

“The whole complex is a cultural conservation district,” Holley said. “In addition, nice micro parks will be landscaped between the buildings with Texas vegetation local to this San Antonio river basin, such as Lantana that grows six feet high with yellow flowers, lots of cactus, desert palms, and native live oaks.”

To conserve water, irrigation for the plants will be provided by an underground cistern that captures rain water.

“But the crown jewel will be the renovation of Building 2270 – the Fort Sam Houston Theatre, to its original grandeur,” Holley said. “Built in 1935, this movie theatre is the first one the Army built in the United States.

“On the inside, it looks a whole like the Warner Brothers’ theaters built around the country in the early 1900s. After completion, we’ll hang original film posters throughout,” Holley said. “Even the ticket booth in the front will have a mannequin inside, ready to take your money for the latest show.”

A portion of theatre will be overhauled and the end product will feature a three-story structure with an 80-foot “fly tower” that will accommodate the raising and lowering of stage sets. The first floor will extend the stage, which only will be used as a rehearsal hall. The other floors will house offices and recording studios.

The 1,100-seat theater will be reduced to an 800-seat theater to allow the balcony to hold lighting and sound equipment. A nearby warehouse will be used for construction of sets, theater maintenance and equipment storage.

The MWR Academy will be built in a field behind the IMCOM complex, on the other side of Wilson Street, with parking for 500.

For the entire IMCOM campus there will be 2,100 parking spaces, mostly located along three blocks of Stanley Road, which runs parallel to Wilson.
“All new construction in this campus within the San Antonio river basin will appear the same, architecturally, so there’ll be no mistaking where IMCOM is located,” Holley said.

In the fall of 2011, after the dust settles from yet another upheaval at Fort Sam, the City of San Antonio, Bexar County, and the military not only will benefit from a strengthened economy and revitalized neighborhoods, but those who have moved into this historical military city as a result of BRAC will find a sense of community and revitalized spirit.

According to Bradner, the move back onto Fort Sam in 2011 will unite “our Family and we’ll be working side by side supporting the Army Family.
“We’ll probably face a number of challenges during that transition, too, but the end result will be greatly improved efficiency and smoother operations across the board,” Bradner said.

Connect with us:
www.Facebook.com/FamilyMWR
www.Twitter.com/FamilyMWR
www.YouTube.com/FamilyMWR

ks 101015

Posted by familymwr on 2010-10-15 19:43:27

Tagged: , Builders , IMCOM , Headquarters , Building , Troy Alexander , Bill Reese , Quality , Assurance , Details , Corps , Engineers , RKJ , Construction , build , cinder , block , wall , 2265 , Fort , Sam , Houston , Texas , U.S. , Army , Family , Morale , Welfare , Recreation , Command , FMWRC , MWR

A transparent Social Behavior Can Help Build A Long Lasting Social Relationship

A transparent Social Behavior Can Help Build A Long Lasting Social Relationship

Social behavior is a concept of creating social relationship with the people living in the society. It is the relationship between two individuals or groups forming a society or the social structure. We are in search of somebody every time as we cannot stay alone. That is why; we make friendship with individuals or with people of different strata living in the different parts of the society.

After working throughout the day, a person needs to have some friends to chill out. These friends are capable enough in making a person ease out the boredom of life. We chat with them talk about our day in office. We make fun with them and try to ease out our fatigue and our working in tight schedule in office. Thus we get respite from the work and spend some leisurely moments with our friends.

There are many people who do not care of having such friends. They spend their time in earning money, making money and nothing. They love to spend their life in utter gloom and unhappiness. They only want money and nothing else. To them money must be earned in plenty. Social relation does not have any value in their eyes. They live in the society but they keep themselves alienated from the society as a whole.  They have no friends, no relatives. They don’t go to any kind of associations or clubs. They are separated from the society and keep themselves aloof from the friends and any kind of social functions. Even if people want to mix with them, they never try to do so. After coming back from office, they either spend time by sleeping or watching TV.

 
Social relation has got some advantages as a whole. These are highly essential in providing fun of life. But sometimes, we have boring friends who ruin the pleasure of life. They do not provide us with any happiness or joy of life. But they do not do so. One should keep away from such boring friends. The problem is not with the social life but with the social relationship that we form.

If we come across a group of friends who are encouraging enough and provide us with the strength of growing up in life then, we will definitely find such friendships or such kind of social relationship highly profitable as well as encouraging. Research reveals the fact that whatever relationships we come across, whether it is small or big, always contribute to our pleasure and happiness.

About The Author

Niyaj Haque is a personality who has been associated with many online portals that are aimed to help people how to nourish the social relationship. The author has delivered a lot of content on useful personal development techniques. For More Information Please Visit Social Behavior and Personal Development Skills.