reality distortion field

reality distortion field

Reality Distortion Field (RDF) is a term coined by Bud Tribble at Apple Computer in 1981, to describe company co-founder Steve Jobs’ charisma and its effects on the developers working on the Macintosh project.

Tribble said that the term came from Star Trek.

Later the term has also been used to refer to perceptions of Job’s keynote speeches (or "Stevenotes") by observers and devoted users of Apple computers and products.

The RDF was said by Andy Hertzfeld to be Steve Jobs’ ability to convince himself and others to believe almost anything with a mix of charm, charisma, bravado, hyperbole, marketing, appeasement and persistence.

RDF was said to distort an audience’s sense of proportion and scales of difficulties and made them believe that the task at hand was possible.

WIKIPEDIA

Posted by CONTROTONO on 2016-09-29 13:57:53

Tagged: , abandoned , colorful , controtono , decay , decayed , decaying , derelict , dereliction , deviate , disused , exploration , explored , explorer , exploring , exposed , exposure , eye , flashing , floor , frontal , urban , urban exploration , urbex , ue , male , man , meat , men , muscle , beautiful , drama , wide angle , handwork , worker , mine , miner , virile , sweat , force , strength , pipe , chemical , coverall , boot , dirty , forgotten , discovery , cool find , engine , generator , desolation , waste , dust , asbestos , mud , broken glasses

computer science

computer science

Posted by CONTROTONO on 2016-09-29 09:47:46

Tagged: , abandoned , colorful , controtono , decay , decayed , decaying , derelict , dereliction , deviate , disused , exploration , explored , explorer , exploring , exposed , exposure , eye , flashing , floor , frontal , urban , urban exploration , urbex , ue , male , man , meat , men , muscle , beautiful , drama , wide angle , handwork , worker , mine , miner , virile , sweat , force , strength , pipe , chemical , coverall , boot , dirty , forgotten , discovery , cool find , engine , generator , desolation , waste , dust , asbestos , mud , broken glasses

boot

boot

I’ve recently forayed back into Linux distributions with an eye to abandoning windows forever. i think the oncoming Longhorn from microsloth is going to be little more than windows xp service pack 3, and it’ll have to pay for the privilege.

So I downloaded five or six Linux live cds, burned them, and ran each off the cd to see if they worked on any of my comps. some did ok, some refused to boot, and one stood out as the easiest to use and most compatible with my hardware.

The beauty of live cds is that you can run Linux without having to install a thing. for permanent install i chose Ubuntu Linux and slapped it onto an ancient gateway p2-333mhz. It booted first time and ran perfectly.

After mucking with it for a day or two to try and learn how to customize it to my liking, I went ahead and installed it on this comp in a dual boot configuration. There were a few minor issues easily solved through the miracle of google, and now it runs.

Fast.

Really fast, and my machine is not slow.

While it is true that Linux is a different environment than windows, and a n00b requires some training and hand holding, two things became abundantly clear: there is an enormous user community that is mostly patient with n00bs; and the learning curve is not *that* steep. Comparatively speaking, while Linux does require a bit of bravery in the beginning using terminal windows and praying you don’t hose the install, windows, while appearing simple out of the box, is just as perplexing to a true computer newbie as is Linux.

I’ve fixed enough windows problems to know that things that seem simple to me aren’t to users who want to "turn it on and have it work". Trouble with that attitude is that computers, and especially windows, don’t work that way. An entire group of my friends have migrated to Macs, because, as one who writes for his living said, "they just work."

Linux isn’t foolproof, but the desktop versions have gotten so much better than they were when i first tried them out in 1999. And, once the initial learning curve is mastered (akin to reading the manual for your windows comp gathering dust in the bottom of a closet somewhere) it is stable and easy to use to do the things most users want to do.

And it’s free. 🙂

Posted by fallsroad on 2005-05-10 07:45:59

Tagged: , monitor , linux , boot , screen