Why Is Backyard Landscape Designs Considered Underrated? | backyard landscape designs

Why Is Backyard Landscape Designs Considered Underrated? | backyard landscape designs

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Why Is Backyard Landscape Designs Considered Underrated? | backyard landscape designs – backyard landscape designs
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Family Fun: Modern Backyard Design for Outdoor Experiences to Come … – backyard landscape designs | backyard landscape designs

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Posted by valdez_juan on 2019-03-17 23:11:31

Tagged: , landscape , design , backyard , designs , australia , for , privacy , images , budget , pictures , free , trees , with , pool , without , grass

In a daze, In a blur

In a daze, In a blur

I just love the imperfections, the way the focus goes out at the corners, the dust and stratches. It’s so imperfect that it just has a character all of its own.

I set up the computer to trigger the camera every 5 seconds or so for 10 shots consecutively so what you get here is me walking over to take a look.

Posted by comebacktomorrow on 2007-08-16 01:02:31

Tagged: , TTV , Me , Study , Australia , Portrait

No Direction Home

No Direction Home

"No Direction Home" . . .

I’ve always loved jumping straight onto the computer to begin editing after my photoshoot and last nights shoot was no exception. I’ve had this loose concept of orphaned siblings in my mind for so long now, it’s extremely wonderful that I actually managed to get it all together and off the ground. I have joyfully and unceasingly been editing this photograph through last night and all of today. Normally I would wait a day or two to publish incase I spot any mistakes I didn’t catch but this time I just can’t keep my fingers from hitting that little blue ‘publish’ button.

A HUGE thank you to my models – Aria, Zenya, Oscar and Xavier. They put up with crazy winds, dust and ash on their faces, itchy grass and a whole lot more.
I also have to say a massive thank you to everyone behind the scenes who helped me, which include but not limited to – Whitney Foster Photography who is not only my dear and wonderful friend but also my true photography companion. Em who is usually the one modelling for me but this time was holding down the fort with her brother and sister in law, Dan and Amanda who are also the parents of Xavier and Oscar.
Last but certainly not least, a thank you to my friend Ellen who made the Costume Aria, the eldest, is wearing. She is a FANTASTIC costume designer and helped me out of a tight spot as I had nothing for Aria to wear with only two days to spare. Check out her instagram @sharpscissors for more of her amazing work.

It may not be what I usually create but I’m happy with the outcome and I hope you guys are too.

Till next time folks … x

Posted by Sian Grahl on 2015-12-21 06:03:44

Tagged: , orphaned , orphans , siblings , blonde , blond beauties , lagoon , corn , edwardian , poor , kids , sunset , conceptual , contemporary , photography , art , heartbreak , lost , lost children , sydney , australia , youth , youthful , wondering , no direction home , vintage , old , worn , family

Storm coming in over the river Murry – South Australia.

Storm coming in over the river Murry - South Australia.

A wild day whilst on our houseboat trip up the River Murray South Australia, this was a combination of a very nasty fire front and the smoke, dust and storm front that was blown our way…the previous photo was sent from my I pad with no adjustments whilst there, I couldn’t wait to get home and upload on my computer and add some color and contrast to the photo as was seen on the day.
I had to remove the old one as it was out of focus and poorly done, prob with old eyes and small screens – lol

Posted by Mykel46 on 2015-11-27 10:27:48

Tagged: , storm , river , murray , South , Australia , nature , wild , weather , Olympus , OMD , EM5mk2 , 7-14mm , f2.8 , pro

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

‘The Dish’ is a well known Australian movie about how this radio telescope at Parkes, NSW, played a major role covering the moon landing in 1969.

I had seen both the movie and some amazing images taken by Simon, a member of Barossa Photography Club so I thought I would also give it a go. Each of these exposures took about 30 minutes – I didn’t get there until nearly 10pm so these (and some which didn’t work out) meant it was getting very late when I finished!

From: www.csiro.au/Portals/Education/Programs/Parkes-Radio-Tele…

The Telescope

CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope is a 64-m diameter parabolic dish used for radio astronomy. It is located about 20 km north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), and about 380 km west of Sydney.

It is operated by CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), a business unit of CSIRO. CASS also operates the Australia Telescope Compact Array near Narrabri, NSW, and the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and is developing the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope in Western Australia.

The telescope was built in 1961, but only its basic structure has remained unchanged. The surface, control system, focus cabin, receivers, computers and cabling have all been upgraded – some parts many times – to keep the telescope current.

The telescope is now ten thousand times more sensitive than when commissioned in 1961.
Using the Telescope

The telescope operates twenty four hours per day, through rain and cloud. About 85 per cent of all time each year is scheduled for observing. Less than five per cent of that is lost because of high winds or equipment problems. Most of the rest of the time each year is used for maintenance and testing. Around 300 researchers use the telescope each year, and more than 40 per cent of these users are from overseas.

The moving part of the dish is not fixed to the top of the tower but just sits on it. Because the large surface catches the wind like a sail, the telescope must be ‘stowed’ (pointed directly up) when the wind exceeds 35 km an hour.
Radio Astronomy

The radio waves from objects in space are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. The power received from a strong cosmic radio source by the Parkes telescope is about a hundredth of a millionth of a millionth of a watt (10-14 W). If you wanted to heat water with this power it would take about 70 000 years to heat one drop by one degree Celsius.

Galaxies contain stars, gas and dust. The gas – mostly hydrogen – is the raw material from which stars form. It emits radio waves, at a frequency of 1420 MHz. Radio astronomers spend a lot of time studying this gas, learning where it is and how it is moving.

Astronomers don’t look through the telescope. Instead, signal processing systems and computers take the radio waves the telescope collects and turns them into pictures (like photographs) of objects in space.

I was very lucky to get the loan of a car and drive to Sydney – a distance of some 1,400 kilometers (around 750 miles). Having seen some amazing night shots of the radio telescope at Parkes, I decided to go that way and spend my first night at Parkes.

Posted by Strabanephotos on 2013-09-09 07:12:54

Tagged: , The , Dish , CSIRO , Radio , Telescope , Parkes , New , South , Wales , Australia , nsw , monday , 2nd , september , 2013 , long , exposure , star , trails , celestial , pole

Stars circling around the Celestial South Pole, The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

Stars circling around the Celestial South Pole, The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

‘The Dish’ is a well known Australian movie about how this radio telescope at Parkes, NSW, played a major role covering the moon landing in 1969.

I had seen both the movie and some amazing images taken by Simon, a member of Barossa Photography Club so I thought I would also give it a go. Each of these exposures took about 30 minutes – I didn’t get there until nearly 10pm so these (and some which didn’t work out) meant it was getting very late when I finished!

From: www.csiro.au/Portals/Education/Programs/Parkes-Radio-Tele…

The Telescope

CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope is a 64-m diameter parabolic dish used for radio astronomy. It is located about 20 km north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), and about 380 km west of Sydney.

It is operated by CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), a business unit of CSIRO. CASS also operates the Australia Telescope Compact Array near Narrabri, NSW, and the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and is developing the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope in Western Australia.

The telescope was built in 1961, but only its basic structure has remained unchanged. The surface, control system, focus cabin, receivers, computers and cabling have all been upgraded – some parts many times – to keep the telescope current.

The telescope is now ten thousand times more sensitive than when commissioned in 1961.
Using the Telescope

The telescope operates twenty four hours per day, through rain and cloud. About 85 per cent of all time each year is scheduled for observing. Less than five per cent of that is lost because of high winds or equipment problems. Most of the rest of the time each year is used for maintenance and testing. Around 300 researchers use the telescope each year, and more than 40 per cent of these users are from overseas.

The moving part of the dish is not fixed to the top of the tower but just sits on it. Because the large surface catches the wind like a sail, the telescope must be ‘stowed’ (pointed directly up) when the wind exceeds 35 km an hour.
Radio Astronomy

The radio waves from objects in space are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. The power received from a strong cosmic radio source by the Parkes telescope is about a hundredth of a millionth of a millionth of a watt (10-14 W). If you wanted to heat water with this power it would take about 70 000 years to heat one drop by one degree Celsius.

Galaxies contain stars, gas and dust. The gas – mostly hydrogen – is the raw material from which stars form. It emits radio waves, at a frequency of 1420 MHz. Radio astronomers spend a lot of time studying this gas, learning where it is and how it is moving.

Astronomers don’t look through the telescope. Instead, signal processing systems and computers take the radio waves the telescope collects and turns them into pictures (like photographs) of objects in space.

I was very lucky to get the loan of a car and drive to Sydney – a distance of some 1,400 kilometers (around 750 miles). Having seen some amazing night shots of the radio telescope at Parkes, I decided to go that way and spend my first night at Parkes.

Posted by Strabanephotos on 2013-09-09 07:13:00

Tagged: , The , Dish , CSIRO , Radio , Telescope , Parkes , New , South , Wales , Australia , nsw , monday , 2nd , september , 2013 , long , exposure , star , trails , celestial , pole

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

The Dish, CSIRO Radio Telescope, Parkes, New South Wales, Australia

The dish was continually moving – usually by small amounts, presumably as the stars moved – but it the middle of a 30 minute exposure it made a huge movement. So the dish is turning round, you can see the stars moving round, the earth is spinning – made me feel quite dizzy 🙂

‘The Dish’ is a well known Australian movie about how this radio telescope at Parkes, NSW, played a major role covering the moon landing in 1969.

I had seen both the movie and some amazing images taken by Simon, a member of Barossa Photography Club so I thought I would also give it a go. Each of these exposures took about 30 minutes – I didn’t get there until nearly 10pm so these (and some which didn’t work out) meant it was getting very late when I finished!

From: www.csiro.au/Portals/Education/Programs/Parkes-Radio-Tele…

The Telescope

CSIRO’s Parkes radio telescope is a 64-m diameter parabolic dish used for radio astronomy. It is located about 20 km north of the town of Parkes, New South Wales (NSW), and about 380 km west of Sydney.

It is operated by CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science (CASS), a business unit of CSIRO. CASS also operates the Australia Telescope Compact Array near Narrabri, NSW, and the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabran, NSW, and is developing the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope in Western Australia.

The telescope was built in 1961, but only its basic structure has remained unchanged. The surface, control system, focus cabin, receivers, computers and cabling have all been upgraded – some parts many times – to keep the telescope current.

The telescope is now ten thousand times more sensitive than when commissioned in 1961.
Using the Telescope

The telescope operates twenty four hours per day, through rain and cloud. About 85 per cent of all time each year is scheduled for observing. Less than five per cent of that is lost because of high winds or equipment problems. Most of the rest of the time each year is used for maintenance and testing. Around 300 researchers use the telescope each year, and more than 40 per cent of these users are from overseas.

The moving part of the dish is not fixed to the top of the tower but just sits on it. Because the large surface catches the wind like a sail, the telescope must be ‘stowed’ (pointed directly up) when the wind exceeds 35 km an hour.
Radio Astronomy

The radio waves from objects in space are extremely weak by the time they reach Earth. The power received from a strong cosmic radio source by the Parkes telescope is about a hundredth of a millionth of a millionth of a watt (10-14 W). If you wanted to heat water with this power it would take about 70 000 years to heat one drop by one degree Celsius.

Galaxies contain stars, gas and dust. The gas – mostly hydrogen – is the raw material from which stars form. It emits radio waves, at a frequency of 1420 MHz. Radio astronomers spend a lot of time studying this gas, learning where it is and how it is moving.

Astronomers don’t look through the telescope. Instead, signal processing systems and computers take the radio waves the telescope collects and turns them into pictures (like photographs) of objects in space.

I was very lucky to get the loan of a car and drive to Sydney – a distance of some 1,400 kilometers (around 750 miles). Having seen some amazing night shots of the radio telescope at Parkes, I decided to go that way and spend my first night at Parkes.

Posted by Strabanephotos on 2013-09-09 07:13:06

Tagged: , The , Dish , CSIRO , Radio , Telescope , Parkes , New , South , Wales , Australia , nsw , monday , 2nd , september , 2013 , long , exposure , star , trails , celestial , pole

Take Me Home Dirt Road

Take Me Home Dirt Road

You travel on one dirt road, you feel like you’ve been on them all. Just seems like time moves slow when you’ve got the sun beating down while the dust fills all your pores and nostrils. But if the artist stops and looks long enough, even on the dusty road a painting can be found.

A little later in the day, and down the road a bit, we met-up with some kangaroos… but that’s another story, and another painting.

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The artist is both professionally trained and self-taught in traditional art mediums… as well as utilizing the computer for yet another means to a visual end.

My subjects include the familiar world around us… nature in all it’s beauty; the four seasons; people; places; the effects of our involvement upon our world; the animal world; etc. I also accept special orders and paint custom subjects upon request… just contact me!

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All limited edition, hand signed prints can be purchased.
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Posted by pdw’s atelier on 2010-02-12 02:53:05

Tagged: , art , painting , landscape , artist , digital , graphics , realism , oils , watercolors , sketch , software , digital pixels , computerized transparent oils , computer tablet paint , palette knife , photo print , limited edition , etsy , Victoria , Australia , picnic

The green green grass of home …

The green green grass of home …

An Australian grazing station in the drougth of 2007. What did the sheep eat? I have just found this photograph in a camera that I had apparently forgotten to download to my computer. Best seen in full size, as the photo is rather dark (but it was winter!)

Posted by BozzyDK on 2007-12-02 15:15:19

Tagged: , winter , drought , grazing , dirt , dust , gum trees , sheep , dam , water , Australia

Computer filth

Computer filth

Have you ever seen a dirtier, dustier PC – and it was still working!

See where this picture was taken. [?]

Posted by NicnBill on 2007-01-24 09:49:41

Tagged: , melbourne , victoria , australia , phonecam , phone , PC , computer , filth , dust , dirt , geo:lat=-37.669283 , geo:lon=144.848707 , geotagged