Flaming star and Tadpoles Nebulae

Flaming star and Tadpoles Nebulae

After what seems like weeks of cloudy nights, last night I grabbed an unexpected few hours of clear, frosty sky and headed 1500 light years away to the Flaming Star (left) and Tadpoles (right) Nebulae in the constellation Auriga.

This shot took 5 hours to expose, a stack of 97 images, each 3 minutes long and was then calibrated with a further 140 calibration frames. With time at the computer to edit all the combined images the whole process took about 9 hours in total.

William Optics GT81
William Optics Flat 6AIII
ZWO ASI2600MC Pro
ZWO ASI Air Pro
Skywatcher HEQ 5 Pro
Optolong L-eNhance filter

97 x 300s lights, 40 darks, 50 flats, 50 dark flats at gain 100 and cooled to -10C.
Stacked in DSS and processed in PS and LR

Posted by Shane Jones on 2020-12-13 15:14:51

Tagged: , Flaming Star Nebula , Tadpoles Nebula , Nebula , Nebulosity , Space , Auriga , Dust , Stars , Celestial , Astro , Astrophotography , Astronomy , William Optics GT81 , Flat 6AIII , ZWO ASI 2600 MC Pro , L-eNhance , Skywatcher HEQ5 Pro

Messier 45 (Pleiades)

Messier 45 (Pleiades)

Constellation: Taurus.
Session: 21-22 Nov 2020.

Follow me on:
Instagram | www.infinitalavita.com

Some on sale on microstocks here:
Shutterstock | Adobe Stock.

In astronomy, the Pleiades (/ˈplaɪədiːz/ or /ˈpliːədiːz/), or Seven Sisters (Messier 45 or M45), is an open star cluster containing middle-aged, hot B-type stars located in the constellation of Taurus. It is among the nearest star clusters to Earth and is the cluster most obvious to the naked eye in the night sky. The celestial entity has several meanings in different cultures and traditions.

The cluster is dominated by hot blue and extremely luminous stars that have formed within the last 100 million years. Dust that forms a faint reflection nebulosity around the brightest stars was thought at first to be left over from the formation of the cluster (hence the alternative name Maia Nebula after the star Maia), but is now known to be an unrelated dust cloud in the interstellar medium, through which the stars are currently passing. Computer simulations have shown that the Pleiades was probably formed from a compact configuration that resembled the Orion Nebula. Astronomers estimate that the cluster will survive for about another 250 million years, after which it will disperse due to gravitational interactions with its galactic neighborhood.

Source: Wikipedia
—————————————————————————————————

• Optics: Skywatcher 130/650 PDS.
• Mount: Skywatcher N-EQ6 Pro (mod).
• Filters: IDAS LPS D1 (2"); Astronomik LRGB (36 mm).
• Accessories: Baader MPCC Mark III 2" coma corrector.
• Camera: QHY163M mono camera.

• L: 40x180s | binning 1×1 | Gain 120 | Offset 80 | cooled – 10°c.

• R: 15x120s | binning 1×1 | Gain 120 | Offset 80 | cooled – 10°c.

• G: 14x120s | binning 1×1 | Gain 120 | Offset 80 | cooled – 10°c.

• B: 14x120s | binning 1×1 | Gain 120 | Offset 80 | cooled – 10°c.

• Integration: 3.43 hours.
• Correction: Darks, Flats, Bias, Dark Flats.

• Skies quality: Bortle 5/10, SQM 19.55.
• Resolution: 1,21"/pixel.
• Field of view: 1.56° x 1.18°.

• Notes: Light polluttion; clouds; haze; moonlight; mapped LRGB.

• Softwares: Pixinsight, Adobe Photoshop.

© www.infinitalavita.com • Cristian Cestaro

Posted by infinitalavita on 2020-11-21 22:00:00

Tagged: , infinita è la vita , astrophotography , astrofotografia , universe , universo , spazio , space , cristian cestaro , www.infinitalavita.com , infinite is life , constellation , costellazione , astronomy , astronomia , messier 45 , pleiadi , pleiades

M45 Pleiades LRGB

M45 Pleiades LRGB

The Pleiades, also known as the Seven Sisters and Messier 45, are an open star cluster containing middle-aged, hot B-type stars located in the constellation of Taurus. It is among the nearest star clusters to Earth and is the cluster most obvious to the naked eye in the night sky.

The cluster is dominated by hot blue and luminous stars that have formed within the last 100 million years. Reflection nebulae around the brightest stars were once thought to be left over material from the formation of the cluster, but are now considered likely to be an unrelated dust cloud in the interstellar medium through which the stars are currently passing.

Computer simulations have shown that the Pleiades were probably formed from a compact configuration that resembled the Orion Nebula. Astronomers estimate that the cluster will survive for about another 250 million years, after which it will disperse due to gravitational interactions with its galactic neighborhood.
(c) Wikipedia

Own remote observatory. AZ-EQ6 mount, ED80 (520mm at 1/6.5), Atik383L+. Guilde – OAG with QHY5 camera.
Baader L: 104 x 600s;
Baader R: 30 x 300s;
Baader G: 30 x 300s;
Baader B: 55 x 300s;
Total exposure – 27 hr.
Captured in SGP, processed in Pixinsight.

Posted by sergiy.vakulenko on 2019-11-09 21:14:20

Tagged: , Astronomy , Astrophotography , Astrophoto , Deepsky , DSO , Space , Sky , Stars , Nebula , M45 , Pleiades , LRGB , ED80 , Atik383L+

Whirlpool Galaxy (M51)

Whirlpool Galaxy (M51)

The Whirlpool Galaxy (also known as Messier 51a, M51a, and NGC 5194). This is the first astro-image created in over a month. During the downtime I have been giving the computer a much-needed overhaul. It was getting slower and slower and crashing with alarming regularity so I re-installed the operating system and upgraded much of the software. That meant there were bound to be some teething problems getting everything up and running again. For this reason we chose a fairly easy target but an old favourite nevertheless. What we call the Whirlpool Galaxy (or M51) is actually a pair of interacting galaxies; M51a, the larger of the pair, is a grand-design spiral galaxy, and its companion, M51b or NGC 5195, is a dwarf galaxy interacting with it. Both galaxies are approximately 25 million light-years away from Earth and are located in the constellation Canes Venatici. M51 can be found just next to the star Alkaid, the most eastern (or leftmost) star in the Big Dipper (or Plough) asterism. The two galaxies are connected by a dust-rich tidal bridge. The dust in this tidal bridge can be seen silhouetted against the center of NGC 5195. This demonstrates that NGC 5195 appears to lie behind the Whirlpool Galaxy. The encounter has significantly enhanced the spiral structure of M51. I measured the diameter of M51a to be approximately 46,000 light years and the diameter of M51b to be 12,560 light years. The distance between the cores of the two galaxies is approximately 28,400 light years. All measurements are approximations made from converting pixels to arcseconds and using the small angle formula.

More information here:
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whirlpool_Galaxy
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NGC_5195

028 x 300 second exposures at Unity Gain (139) cooled to -20°C
030 x dark frames
050 x flat frames
100 x bias frames (subtracted from flat frames)
Binning 1×1
Total integration time = 2 hours and 20 minutes

Captured with APT
Guided with PHD2
Processed in Nebulosity and Photoshop

Equipment:
Telescope: Sky-Watcher Explorer-150PDS
Mount: Skywatcher EQ5
Guide Scope: Orion 50mm Mini
Guiding Camera: ZWO ASI120MC
Imaging Camera: ZWO ASI1600MC Pro
Baader Mark-III MPCC Coma Corrector
Light pollution filter

Posted by Davide Simonetti on 2020-04-21 04:26:30

Tagged: , Whirlpool Galaxy , Spiral Galaxies , Galaxies , Messier 51a , Messier 51b , Messier 51 , M51a , M51b , M51 , NGC 5194 , NGC 5195 , Space , Astrophotography , Astronomy

NGC 5256 and Their Last Dance

NGC 5256 and Their Last Dance

[NGC 5256]

NGC 5256 is a galaxy that has two disc galaxies, that are colliding into each other.
It was discovered by William Herschel and it is located in the constellation Ursa Major. NGC 5256 is located about 350 million lightyears away from the Earth.

Here is a brief explanation of what is happening here; Two disc galaxies started to interact with each other gravitationally for billions of years. That gravitational interaction caused a collision between two galaxies. When they finally collided both galaxies started to release enormous amounts of energy and ionized gas to the vastness of space. You can see the remaining dust and gas from the ongoing last phase of collision. Also red surrounding ionized gas is mostly made out of SII

Technical Details;

Image color:
-Composed 5 channels to create a color balance. 3 different stacked and cleared data sets were used.

Cameras used:
-Hubble Space Telescope-WFC3 (Wide Field Camera 3)
-Hubble Space Telescope-ACS (Advanced Camera for Surveys)

Filters:
-435nm (Optical Blue)
-673nm (Optical SII)
-814nm (Infrared)

Processing Softwares:
-Siril (I used this software to combine 3 different monochrome images that were taken with 3 different filter and 2 different camera. I also used this software for color calibration)

-GIMP (I used this software to clear artifacts and other stuff on the image using healing tool. I also did some levels adjustments)

-Topaz Studio 2 (I used this software which can clear and denoise the image using artificial intelligence)

-Adobe PS (I used this software to align and rescale the monochrome images since they were taken with different cameras they weren’t aligning)

-Adobe Lightroom CC (I used this software to add sharpness, texture and clarity I also denoised the image a little bit to make it softer)

-ESA/ESO/NASA FITS Liberator(I used this software to stretch the RAW data sets that I got from Hubble Legacy Archive [HLA])

Credits:
-NASA, ESA, Hubble, HLA
-Hüseyin Avcu (@hsyns_astro & @juggernatphysics [on Instagram])

Posted by hsyn.avcu5 on 2020-08-10 13:11:38

Tagged: , Astrophotography , Astronomy , Computer , Processing , Telescope , Space , Hubble

M45- The Pleiades Cluster

M45- The Pleiades Cluster

The Pleiades, also known as M45, the Seven Sisters or Subaru (Japan), is an open star cluster containing middle-aged stars located in the constellation of Taurus. It is among the nearest star clusters to Earth and is the cluster most obvious to the naked eye in the night sky.

The cluster is dominated by hot blue and extremely luminous stars that have formed within the last 100 million years. Dust that forms a faint reflection nebulosity around the brightest stars was thought at first to be left over from the formation of the cluster is now known to be an unrelated dust cloud in the interstellar medium, through which the stars are currently passing. Computer simulations have shown that the Pleiades was probably formed from a compact configuration that resembled the Orion Nebula. Astronomers estimate that the cluster will survive for about another 250 million years, after which it will disperse due to gravitational interactions with its galactic neighborhood.

[Info from Wikipedia]

Nikon D5100
Explore Scientific ED80
Celestron AVX Mount
23 x 120 second exposures @ ISO 1600

Shot from the L&A Dark Sky Viewing Area in Erinsville, Ontario

Posted by Dark Arts Astrophotography on 2016-10-08 20:38:55

Tagged: , astrophotography , astronomy , space , Pleiades , Subaru , Cluster , m45 , Kingston , kingstonist , Ontario , Astrometrydotnet:id=nova1769464 , Astrometrydotnet:status=solved

Still and stunning

Still and stunning

I can almost hear once again the sound of the quiet that I enjoyed while I shot this scene at the beginning of June on the Tuross River, on Australia’s southeast coast. The lack of breeze on the river rendered the water’s surface a natural mirror to reflect the light from the sky and the foreground to where I had positioned my camera. As well as numerous stars, you can see the Large Magellanic Cloud–which is a galaxy and not a cloud at all–shining off the top of the water.

At this point, the river forks off to the right into Bumbo Creek, which is broached by the wooden bridge that leads to lush and prized dairy paddocks. Beyond that bridge, you can see the fine layer of fog that hovered over the fields in the post-midnight hour.

Ruling over it all, of course, is the central band and concentrated core of our home in the heavens, the Milky Way galaxy. My attraction to viewing and photographing this section of the sky isn’t only the billions of stars concentrated there. The dark filament-like structures known as "dust lanes" that only make themselves visible by the millions of stars they obscure, also captivate me.

I created this image by shooting nine overlapping images, with my camera mounted on a panoramic head that sets a fixed angle between each photo. After capturing the individual pictures and downloading them to my computer, I used some panorama-stitching software to blend the nine images into one. To shoot each of those nine photos I used my Canon EOS 6D Mk II camera, a Samyang 14mm f/2.4 lens @ f/2.4, using an exposure time of 20 seconds @ ISO 6400.

Posted by nightscapades on 2019-07-30 12:09:57

Tagged: , Astronomy , Astrophotography , Australia , Autopano Pro , Eurobodalla , Galactic Core , Milky Way , Night , Nightscapes , Pano , Panorama , Panos , River , Sky , South Coast NSW , Stars , Stitch , Tuross , Tuross Head , Tuross River , Reflection , Large Magellanic Cloud , New South Wales

Pleiades (M45)

Pleiades (M45)

The Pleiades
In astronomy, the Pleiades, or Seven Sisters (Messier 45 or M45), is an open star cluster containing middle-aged, hot B-type stars located in the constellation of Taurus. It is among the nearest star clusters to Earth and is the cluster most obvious to the naked eye in the night sky. The celestial entity has several meanings in different cultures and traditions.

The cluster is dominated by hot blue and extremely luminous stars that have formed within the last 100 million years. Dust that forms a faint reflection nebulosity around the brightest stars was thought at first to be left over from the formation of the cluster (hence the alternative name Maia Nebula after the star Maia), but is now known to be an unrelated dust cloud in the interstellar medium, through which the stars are currently passing. Computer simulations have shown that the Pleiades was probably formed from a compact configuration that resembled the Orion Nebula. Astronomers estimate that the cluster will survive for about another 250 million years, after which it will disperse due to gravitational interactions with its galactic neighborhood.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pleiades

Taken in Ortigia, Sicily with 105mm lens at f2.8 – camera piggybacked on my telescope with the alt-az mount.

83 x 10 second exposures at 6400 ISO
59 x 15 second exposures at 6400 ISO
60 x dark frames
40 x flat frames
24 x bias/offset frames (subtracted from flat frames only)

Processed in Nebulosity, Maxim DL, and Photoshop.

Posted by Davide Simonetti on 2016-09-25 02:39:10

Tagged: , Pleiades , Seven Sisters , Star Clusters , M45 , Messier 45 , Astrophotography , Astronomy

Mars with polar ice caps

Mars with polar ice caps

Mars with polar ice caps visible. Dark areas are dust storms while redish is planet surace. This is my first Mars shoot and the final images are a bit blurred as I was taking these as our sun was coming up (~6:30a). Better images to come.

Posted by eric_milbrandt on 2018-03-12 10:37:32

Tagged: , ~Astrophotography , computer wallpaper , Any Vision , darkness , phenomenon , atmosphere of earth , moonlight , sky , atmosphere , Labels , A , night , C , D , moon , M , O , N , daytime , S , Mars , astronomy , outer space , space , macro photography , U , universe , planet , P , midnight , astronomical object , celestial event , ~Solar System

Orion and the running man

Orion and the running man

After a few months waiting for it, I finally got to play with my new telescope and I revisited The Orion Nebula (M42). This time, I could include the Running Man Nebula as well (NGC 1977). Their light took roughly 1500 years to cross space and hit the sensor of my camera. I am very pleased as I could gather much more information this time. Considering that the moon was 97% illuminated yesterday night, I didn’t think I could be able to salvage these details. Looking forward to some clear and dark nights.
For those interested in the technical details, this is a stack of the best 50% of 78 light frames, stacked with 20 dark frames (used to reduce the heat noise from long exposures), 20 flat frames (to reduce vignetting and dust), as well as 20 bias frames (used to detect camera noise and dead pixels). The camera is an EOS 550d modified for astrophotography.
Taking the photos was the quick part (fortunately as it was just about to freeze last night). A couple of computer hours were necessary to bring all the details out.

Posted by Christian Gloor (mostly) underwater photographer on 2019-03-20 16:17:42

Tagged: , Orion , running , man , nebula , M42 , M43 , space , astrophotography , night , telescope , Celestron