2012 AMS Alpha 12 GT-R

2012 AMS Alpha 12 GT-R

Horsepower is highly addictive. As automotive enthusiasts, we crave it insatiably.

Each time we place ourselves behind the wheel of a vehicle, a brief moment arrives when we wish for just a little more potency. Whether driving a 138-horsepower Kia Rio or a 638-horsepower Chevrolet Corvette ZR1, there is always an instant when the initial rush begins to slow and we ache for just a little bit more.

But what if it were possible to have too much power? What if there were a vehicle that satisfied our desire so completely, to the point where we were overwhelmed (think along the lines of sweet-tooth Augustus Gloop swimming in Willy Wonka’s river of chocolate)? Would we finally stop thirsting for more?

To solve the riddle, we tracked down the fiendish Alpha 12 GT-R by AMS Performance. It is not just the quickest accelerating street-legal car that Autoblog has ever driven. With a quarter-mile time of 8.975 seconds at 169.49 miles per hour, it is likely the quickest street-legal volume-produced tuner vehicle on the planet.

Founded in early 2001, AMS Performance is no stranger to horsepower. One of the company’s first projects was tweaking Ford’s turbocharged 2.3-liter under the hood of the (under-appreciated) Merkur XR4Ti. It wasn’t long before the team, led by Martin Musial, began tooling on more capable cars like the Mitsubishi Evolution VIII and Nissan 240SX. By 2007, the company had moved to a facility in West Chicago and its competition-only AMS drag car had captured the title as the "World’s Quickest Evo VIII." In 2009, AMS expanded its portfolio and began to focus on a wider variety of sports cars from Porsche, BMW, Hyundai and Nissan.

Then the Alpha 12 was developed – it is, in three simple words, Godzilla on crack.

But it was the Nissan GT-R (aka "Godzilla") that really captured the company’s attention. Despite being blazingly fast right off the showroom floor, AMS developed and refined the car to deliver even quicker acceleration. World records fell as its Alpha 6, Alpha 9 and Alpha 10 models devoured the competition at drag strips and on racing circuits. But then the Alpha 12 was developed – it is, in three simple words, Godzilla on crack.

Transforming a GT-R into an Alpha 12 is involved. After customers supply AMS with a donor R35 GT-R (new or used), the stock powertrain is surgically pulled and the metamorphosis begins. The OEM 3.8-liter VR38DETT V6 block is bored out to 4.0-liters of displacement, reinforced, and then fitted with an AMS Alpha CNC race ported cylinder head with AMS custom camshafts, AMS injectors, AMS MAP sensors and more. The stock turbochargers are ditched and replaced with an AMS Alpha 12 Turbo Kit, and an AMS intercooler and pipes are installed to reduce the charge temperature. The entire exhaust, from downpipes to the muffler, is then replaced with high-flow componentry. Lastly, the stock gearbox is upgraded with PPG and Dodson components and the differential is fitted with a high capacity oil cooler. What finally emerges is a balanced and blueprinted AMS Alpha 4.0L Race Engine.

Locate a dynamometer that can handle it and the Alpha 12 will show you 1,100 horsepower and 900 pound-feet of torque on 93 octane unleaded. Pump in some racing fuel, and those numbers rise to 1,500 horsepower and 1,050 pound-feet of torque. The figures are dizzying, but they speak for themselves. The 0-60 sprint takes 2.4 seconds. More spectacular is the acceleration from 60-130 mph. The Alpha 12 does it in just 3.31 seconds. In the aforementioned quarter mile, a range-topping Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport (almost a second slower in the benchmark) would be left choking on its dust.

Locate a dynamometer that can handle it and the Alpha 12 will show you 1,100 hp and 900 lb-ft of torque on 93 octane unleaded.

Understandably, a car like this needs some serious real estate to run. Wide open asphalt in places like Texas, Nevada or the deserts of California come to mind. But sadly, we are sitting behind the wheel of the record-breaking jet black Alpha 12 in congested Santa Monica, California. To make lemonade out of our rather sour situation, our goal is to drive the modified GT-R north, up famed Pacific Coast Highway, to escape the bulk of the stop-and-go beach traffic. While we won’t be cracking triple-digits, we should be able to get a good sense of what this thing is all about.

We met the Alpha 12 in a dimly lit concrete parking structure under a Santa Monica hotel. To its credit, and despite all of the carbon-fiber add-ons, the black Nissan GT-R appears both tasteful and clean. Even compared to the other tame passenger vehicles in the garage, it didn’t appear ostentatious. After a splash of (racing?) fuel from a handy five-gallon container, I climbed into the driver’s seat..

Sitting to my right was Ivan Phipps, Special Projects Technician at AMS. Seriously multitalented, Ivan is as skilled with a wrench as he is behind the steering wheel, which made him the ideal co-pilot (Ivan was in the driver’s seat of the Alpha 12 for its record-setting quarter-mile run, and in another video losing control – and recovering – at over 200 mph).

Everything, including the automatic climate control, still works as it did from the factory.

Following the tone set by the exterior, the cabin of the Alpha 12 will appear virtually stock unless the customer orders extras such as race bucket seats, harnesses or a roll cage. In fact, with the exception of some of the non-working telemetry on the center stack computer (some of the sensors are confused by the modified fuel injection and new engine mapping), everything, including the automatic climate control, still works as it did from the factory. Furthermore, and serving as a testament to its streetability, all functional controls work exactly as they do on a stock GT-R.

With a press of the ‘start’ button, the freely breathing 4.0-liter V6 barked to life and sent a concussion wave bouncing off the walls of the parking garage. Idle was smooth, but the raspy and aggressive exhaust note coming out of the enlarged tailpipes was delivering clues that everything wasn’t normal. The Alpha 12 will operate in full automatic mode just like any stock GT-R, but Ivan explained up front that he preferred to shift the dual-clutch gearbox manually with the steering wheel-mounted paddles. Ignoring his suggestion, I left everything in automatic mode and pulled out of the parking garage.

I had covered no more than a quarter mile when Ivan’s comment immediately made sense. The heavily modified gearbox, designed to handle upwards of 1,000 pounds-feet of torque, was brutally deliberate in its fully automatic engagement – uncomfortably so. After a few minutes of taking the abuse, I heeded my passenger’s advice and began to shift manually with the column-mounted paddles. There was more too it, though, as the manual-mode shifts still felt as if we were being rear-ended by a 40-ton anvil with each gear change. After some experimentation, I discovered the trick to driving the Alpha 12 smoothly. By lifting off the accelerator slightly between shifts (just like you would do when clutching with a manual gearbox), engagement of the next gear was smooth.

Don’t get the impression that an Alpha 12 is a docile pussycat. Its mannerisms are much harsher than a stock GT-R.

Don’t get the impression that an Alpha 12 is a docile pussycat. In fact, its mannerisms are much harsher than a stock GT-R. To handle its outrageous output, AMS has fitted some seriously heavy-duty components. Most are buried within, but some (like the high-volume free-flow exhaust and the differential oil pump with straight-cut gears) operate much louder than stock mechanicals. To a true gearhead, one who can identify the din, the sound is oddly reassuring.

As AMS has left the stock Brembo brakes and multi-mode electrically adjustable damping suspension in place (no need to add unnecessary complexity), the ride remains every bit as compliant and comfortable as a stock GT-R. For street use and occasional drag racing this is probably just fine, but I would upgrade the brake pads at minimum if road-racing track duty is on the agenda.

Posted by Mr_Pictures on 2014-09-01 20:42:36

Tagged: , 2012 , AMS , Alpha , 12 , GT-R

2012 AMS Alpha 12 GT-R

2012 AMS Alpha 12 GT-R

Horsepower is highly addictive. As automotive enthusiasts, we crave it insatiably.

Each time we place ourselves behind the wheel of a vehicle, a brief moment arrives when we wish for just a little more potency. Whether driving a 138-horsepower Kia Rio or a 638-horsepower Chevrolet Corvette ZR1, there is always an instant when the initial rush begins to slow and we ache for just a little bit more.

But what if it were possible to have too much power? What if there were a vehicle that satisfied our desire so completely, to the point where we were overwhelmed (think along the lines of sweet-tooth Augustus Gloop swimming in Willy Wonka’s river of chocolate)? Would we finally stop thirsting for more?

To solve the riddle, we tracked down the fiendish Alpha 12 GT-R by AMS Performance. It is not just the quickest accelerating street-legal car that Autoblog has ever driven. With a quarter-mile time of 8.975 seconds at 169.49 miles per hour, it is likely the quickest street-legal volume-produced tuner vehicle on the planet.

Founded in early 2001, AMS Performance is no stranger to horsepower. One of the company’s first projects was tweaking Ford’s turbocharged 2.3-liter under the hood of the (under-appreciated) Merkur XR4Ti. It wasn’t long before the team, led by Martin Musial, began tooling on more capable cars like the Mitsubishi Evolution VIII and Nissan 240SX. By 2007, the company had moved to a facility in West Chicago and its competition-only AMS drag car had captured the title as the "World’s Quickest Evo VIII." In 2009, AMS expanded its portfolio and began to focus on a wider variety of sports cars from Porsche, BMW, Hyundai and Nissan.

Then the Alpha 12 was developed – it is, in three simple words, Godzilla on crack.

But it was the Nissan GT-R (aka "Godzilla") that really captured the company’s attention. Despite being blazingly fast right off the showroom floor, AMS developed and refined the car to deliver even quicker acceleration. World records fell as its Alpha 6, Alpha 9 and Alpha 10 models devoured the competition at drag strips and on racing circuits. But then the Alpha 12 was developed – it is, in three simple words, Godzilla on crack.

Transforming a GT-R into an Alpha 12 is involved. After customers supply AMS with a donor R35 GT-R (new or used), the stock powertrain is surgically pulled and the metamorphosis begins. The OEM 3.8-liter VR38DETT V6 block is bored out to 4.0-liters of displacement, reinforced, and then fitted with an AMS Alpha CNC race ported cylinder head with AMS custom camshafts, AMS injectors, AMS MAP sensors and more. The stock turbochargers are ditched and replaced with an AMS Alpha 12 Turbo Kit, and an AMS intercooler and pipes are installed to reduce the charge temperature. The entire exhaust, from downpipes to the muffler, is then replaced with high-flow componentry. Lastly, the stock gearbox is upgraded with PPG and Dodson components and the differential is fitted with a high capacity oil cooler. What finally emerges is a balanced and blueprinted AMS Alpha 4.0L Race Engine.

Locate a dynamometer that can handle it and the Alpha 12 will show you 1,100 horsepower and 900 pound-feet of torque on 93 octane unleaded. Pump in some racing fuel, and those numbers rise to 1,500 horsepower and 1,050 pound-feet of torque. The figures are dizzying, but they speak for themselves. The 0-60 sprint takes 2.4 seconds. More spectacular is the acceleration from 60-130 mph. The Alpha 12 does it in just 3.31 seconds. In the aforementioned quarter mile, a range-topping Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport (almost a second slower in the benchmark) would be left choking on its dust.

Locate a dynamometer that can handle it and the Alpha 12 will show you 1,100 hp and 900 lb-ft of torque on 93 octane unleaded.

Understandably, a car like this needs some serious real estate to run. Wide open asphalt in places like Texas, Nevada or the deserts of California come to mind. But sadly, we are sitting behind the wheel of the record-breaking jet black Alpha 12 in congested Santa Monica, California. To make lemonade out of our rather sour situation, our goal is to drive the modified GT-R north, up famed Pacific Coast Highway, to escape the bulk of the stop-and-go beach traffic. While we won’t be cracking triple-digits, we should be able to get a good sense of what this thing is all about.

We met the Alpha 12 in a dimly lit concrete parking structure under a Santa Monica hotel. To its credit, and despite all of the carbon-fiber add-ons, the black Nissan GT-R appears both tasteful and clean. Even compared to the other tame passenger vehicles in the garage, it didn’t appear ostentatious. After a splash of (racing?) fuel from a handy five-gallon container, I climbed into the driver’s seat..

Sitting to my right was Ivan Phipps, Special Projects Technician at AMS. Seriously multitalented, Ivan is as skilled with a wrench as he is behind the steering wheel, which made him the ideal co-pilot (Ivan was in the driver’s seat of the Alpha 12 for its record-setting quarter-mile run, and in another video losing control – and recovering – at over 200 mph).

Everything, including the automatic climate control, still works as it did from the factory.

Following the tone set by the exterior, the cabin of the Alpha 12 will appear virtually stock unless the customer orders extras such as race bucket seats, harnesses or a roll cage. In fact, with the exception of some of the non-working telemetry on the center stack computer (some of the sensors are confused by the modified fuel injection and new engine mapping), everything, including the automatic climate control, still works as it did from the factory. Furthermore, and serving as a testament to its streetability, all functional controls work exactly as they do on a stock GT-R.

With a press of the ‘start’ button, the freely breathing 4.0-liter V6 barked to life and sent a concussion wave bouncing off the walls of the parking garage. Idle was smooth, but the raspy and aggressive exhaust note coming out of the enlarged tailpipes was delivering clues that everything wasn’t normal. The Alpha 12 will operate in full automatic mode just like any stock GT-R, but Ivan explained up front that he preferred to shift the dual-clutch gearbox manually with the steering wheel-mounted paddles. Ignoring his suggestion, I left everything in automatic mode and pulled out of the parking garage.

I had covered no more than a quarter mile when Ivan’s comment immediately made sense. The heavily modified gearbox, designed to handle upwards of 1,000 pounds-feet of torque, was brutally deliberate in its fully automatic engagement – uncomfortably so. After a few minutes of taking the abuse, I heeded my passenger’s advice and began to shift manually with the column-mounted paddles. There was more too it, though, as the manual-mode shifts still felt as if we were being rear-ended by a 40-ton anvil with each gear change. After some experimentation, I discovered the trick to driving the Alpha 12 smoothly. By lifting off the accelerator slightly between shifts (just like you would do when clutching with a manual gearbox), engagement of the next gear was smooth.

Don’t get the impression that an Alpha 12 is a docile pussycat. Its mannerisms are much harsher than a stock GT-R.

Don’t get the impression that an Alpha 12 is a docile pussycat. In fact, its mannerisms are much harsher than a stock GT-R. To handle its outrageous output, AMS has fitted some seriously heavy-duty components. Most are buried within, but some (like the high-volume free-flow exhaust and the differential oil pump with straight-cut gears) operate much louder than stock mechanicals. To a true gearhead, one who can identify the din, the sound is oddly reassuring.

As AMS has left the stock Brembo brakes and multi-mode electrically adjustable damping suspension in place (no need to add unnecessary complexity), the ride remains every bit as compliant and comfortable as a stock GT-R. For street use and occasional drag racing this is probably just fine, but I would upgrade the brake pads at minimum if road-racing track duty is on the agenda.

Posted by Mr_Pictures on 2014-09-01 20:42:45

Tagged: , 2012 , AMS , Alpha , 12 , GT-R

2012 AMS Alpha 12 GT-R

2012 AMS Alpha 12 GT-R

Horsepower is highly addictive. As automotive enthusiasts, we crave it insatiably.

Each time we place ourselves behind the wheel of a vehicle, a brief moment arrives when we wish for just a little more potency. Whether driving a 138-horsepower Kia Rio or a 638-horsepower Chevrolet Corvette ZR1, there is always an instant when the initial rush begins to slow and we ache for just a little bit more.

But what if it were possible to have too much power? What if there were a vehicle that satisfied our desire so completely, to the point where we were overwhelmed (think along the lines of sweet-tooth Augustus Gloop swimming in Willy Wonka’s river of chocolate)? Would we finally stop thirsting for more?

To solve the riddle, we tracked down the fiendish Alpha 12 GT-R by AMS Performance. It is not just the quickest accelerating street-legal car that Autoblog has ever driven. With a quarter-mile time of 8.975 seconds at 169.49 miles per hour, it is likely the quickest street-legal volume-produced tuner vehicle on the planet.

Founded in early 2001, AMS Performance is no stranger to horsepower. One of the company’s first projects was tweaking Ford’s turbocharged 2.3-liter under the hood of the (under-appreciated) Merkur XR4Ti. It wasn’t long before the team, led by Martin Musial, began tooling on more capable cars like the Mitsubishi Evolution VIII and Nissan 240SX. By 2007, the company had moved to a facility in West Chicago and its competition-only AMS drag car had captured the title as the "World’s Quickest Evo VIII." In 2009, AMS expanded its portfolio and began to focus on a wider variety of sports cars from Porsche, BMW, Hyundai and Nissan.

Then the Alpha 12 was developed – it is, in three simple words, Godzilla on crack.

But it was the Nissan GT-R (aka "Godzilla") that really captured the company’s attention. Despite being blazingly fast right off the showroom floor, AMS developed and refined the car to deliver even quicker acceleration. World records fell as its Alpha 6, Alpha 9 and Alpha 10 models devoured the competition at drag strips and on racing circuits. But then the Alpha 12 was developed – it is, in three simple words, Godzilla on crack.

Transforming a GT-R into an Alpha 12 is involved. After customers supply AMS with a donor R35 GT-R (new or used), the stock powertrain is surgically pulled and the metamorphosis begins. The OEM 3.8-liter VR38DETT V6 block is bored out to 4.0-liters of displacement, reinforced, and then fitted with an AMS Alpha CNC race ported cylinder head with AMS custom camshafts, AMS injectors, AMS MAP sensors and more. The stock turbochargers are ditched and replaced with an AMS Alpha 12 Turbo Kit, and an AMS intercooler and pipes are installed to reduce the charge temperature. The entire exhaust, from downpipes to the muffler, is then replaced with high-flow componentry. Lastly, the stock gearbox is upgraded with PPG and Dodson components and the differential is fitted with a high capacity oil cooler. What finally emerges is a balanced and blueprinted AMS Alpha 4.0L Race Engine.

Locate a dynamometer that can handle it and the Alpha 12 will show you 1,100 horsepower and 900 pound-feet of torque on 93 octane unleaded. Pump in some racing fuel, and those numbers rise to 1,500 horsepower and 1,050 pound-feet of torque. The figures are dizzying, but they speak for themselves. The 0-60 sprint takes 2.4 seconds. More spectacular is the acceleration from 60-130 mph. The Alpha 12 does it in just 3.31 seconds. In the aforementioned quarter mile, a range-topping Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport (almost a second slower in the benchmark) would be left choking on its dust.

Locate a dynamometer that can handle it and the Alpha 12 will show you 1,100 hp and 900 lb-ft of torque on 93 octane unleaded.

Understandably, a car like this needs some serious real estate to run. Wide open asphalt in places like Texas, Nevada or the deserts of California come to mind. But sadly, we are sitting behind the wheel of the record-breaking jet black Alpha 12 in congested Santa Monica, California. To make lemonade out of our rather sour situation, our goal is to drive the modified GT-R north, up famed Pacific Coast Highway, to escape the bulk of the stop-and-go beach traffic. While we won’t be cracking triple-digits, we should be able to get a good sense of what this thing is all about.

We met the Alpha 12 in a dimly lit concrete parking structure under a Santa Monica hotel. To its credit, and despite all of the carbon-fiber add-ons, the black Nissan GT-R appears both tasteful and clean. Even compared to the other tame passenger vehicles in the garage, it didn’t appear ostentatious. After a splash of (racing?) fuel from a handy five-gallon container, I climbed into the driver’s seat..

Sitting to my right was Ivan Phipps, Special Projects Technician at AMS. Seriously multitalented, Ivan is as skilled with a wrench as he is behind the steering wheel, which made him the ideal co-pilot (Ivan was in the driver’s seat of the Alpha 12 for its record-setting quarter-mile run, and in another video losing control – and recovering – at over 200 mph).

Everything, including the automatic climate control, still works as it did from the factory.

Following the tone set by the exterior, the cabin of the Alpha 12 will appear virtually stock unless the customer orders extras such as race bucket seats, harnesses or a roll cage. In fact, with the exception of some of the non-working telemetry on the center stack computer (some of the sensors are confused by the modified fuel injection and new engine mapping), everything, including the automatic climate control, still works as it did from the factory. Furthermore, and serving as a testament to its streetability, all functional controls work exactly as they do on a stock GT-R.

With a press of the ‘start’ button, the freely breathing 4.0-liter V6 barked to life and sent a concussion wave bouncing off the walls of the parking garage. Idle was smooth, but the raspy and aggressive exhaust note coming out of the enlarged tailpipes was delivering clues that everything wasn’t normal. The Alpha 12 will operate in full automatic mode just like any stock GT-R, but Ivan explained up front that he preferred to shift the dual-clutch gearbox manually with the steering wheel-mounted paddles. Ignoring his suggestion, I left everything in automatic mode and pulled out of the parking garage.

I had covered no more than a quarter mile when Ivan’s comment immediately made sense. The heavily modified gearbox, designed to handle upwards of 1,000 pounds-feet of torque, was brutally deliberate in its fully automatic engagement – uncomfortably so. After a few minutes of taking the abuse, I heeded my passenger’s advice and began to shift manually with the column-mounted paddles. There was more too it, though, as the manual-mode shifts still felt as if we were being rear-ended by a 40-ton anvil with each gear change. After some experimentation, I discovered the trick to driving the Alpha 12 smoothly. By lifting off the accelerator slightly between shifts (just like you would do when clutching with a manual gearbox), engagement of the next gear was smooth.

Don’t get the impression that an Alpha 12 is a docile pussycat. Its mannerisms are much harsher than a stock GT-R.

Don’t get the impression that an Alpha 12 is a docile pussycat. In fact, its mannerisms are much harsher than a stock GT-R. To handle its outrageous output, AMS has fitted some seriously heavy-duty components. Most are buried within, but some (like the high-volume free-flow exhaust and the differential oil pump with straight-cut gears) operate much louder than stock mechanicals. To a true gearhead, one who can identify the din, the sound is oddly reassuring.

As AMS has left the stock Brembo brakes and multi-mode electrically adjustable damping suspension in place (no need to add unnecessary complexity), the ride remains every bit as compliant and comfortable as a stock GT-R. For street use and occasional drag racing this is probably just fine, but I would upgrade the brake pads at minimum if road-racing track duty is on the agenda.

Posted by Mr_Pictures on 2014-09-01 20:42:53

Tagged: , 2012 , AMS , Alpha , 12 , GT-R

2012 AMS Alpha 12 GT-R

2012 AMS Alpha 12 GT-R

Horsepower is highly addictive. As automotive enthusiasts, we crave it insatiably.

Each time we place ourselves behind the wheel of a vehicle, a brief moment arrives when we wish for just a little more potency. Whether driving a 138-horsepower Kia Rio or a 638-horsepower Chevrolet Corvette ZR1, there is always an instant when the initial rush begins to slow and we ache for just a little bit more.

But what if it were possible to have too much power? What if there were a vehicle that satisfied our desire so completely, to the point where we were overwhelmed (think along the lines of sweet-tooth Augustus Gloop swimming in Willy Wonka’s river of chocolate)? Would we finally stop thirsting for more?

To solve the riddle, we tracked down the fiendish Alpha 12 GT-R by AMS Performance. It is not just the quickest accelerating street-legal car that Autoblog has ever driven. With a quarter-mile time of 8.975 seconds at 169.49 miles per hour, it is likely the quickest street-legal volume-produced tuner vehicle on the planet.

Founded in early 2001, AMS Performance is no stranger to horsepower. One of the company’s first projects was tweaking Ford’s turbocharged 2.3-liter under the hood of the (under-appreciated) Merkur XR4Ti. It wasn’t long before the team, led by Martin Musial, began tooling on more capable cars like the Mitsubishi Evolution VIII and Nissan 240SX. By 2007, the company had moved to a facility in West Chicago and its competition-only AMS drag car had captured the title as the "World’s Quickest Evo VIII." In 2009, AMS expanded its portfolio and began to focus on a wider variety of sports cars from Porsche, BMW, Hyundai and Nissan.

Then the Alpha 12 was developed – it is, in three simple words, Godzilla on crack.

But it was the Nissan GT-R (aka "Godzilla") that really captured the company’s attention. Despite being blazingly fast right off the showroom floor, AMS developed and refined the car to deliver even quicker acceleration. World records fell as its Alpha 6, Alpha 9 and Alpha 10 models devoured the competition at drag strips and on racing circuits. But then the Alpha 12 was developed – it is, in three simple words, Godzilla on crack.

Transforming a GT-R into an Alpha 12 is involved. After customers supply AMS with a donor R35 GT-R (new or used), the stock powertrain is surgically pulled and the metamorphosis begins. The OEM 3.8-liter VR38DETT V6 block is bored out to 4.0-liters of displacement, reinforced, and then fitted with an AMS Alpha CNC race ported cylinder head with AMS custom camshafts, AMS injectors, AMS MAP sensors and more. The stock turbochargers are ditched and replaced with an AMS Alpha 12 Turbo Kit, and an AMS intercooler and pipes are installed to reduce the charge temperature. The entire exhaust, from downpipes to the muffler, is then replaced with high-flow componentry. Lastly, the stock gearbox is upgraded with PPG and Dodson components and the differential is fitted with a high capacity oil cooler. What finally emerges is a balanced and blueprinted AMS Alpha 4.0L Race Engine.

Locate a dynamometer that can handle it and the Alpha 12 will show you 1,100 horsepower and 900 pound-feet of torque on 93 octane unleaded. Pump in some racing fuel, and those numbers rise to 1,500 horsepower and 1,050 pound-feet of torque. The figures are dizzying, but they speak for themselves. The 0-60 sprint takes 2.4 seconds. More spectacular is the acceleration from 60-130 mph. The Alpha 12 does it in just 3.31 seconds. In the aforementioned quarter mile, a range-topping Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport (almost a second slower in the benchmark) would be left choking on its dust.

Locate a dynamometer that can handle it and the Alpha 12 will show you 1,100 hp and 900 lb-ft of torque on 93 octane unleaded.

Understandably, a car like this needs some serious real estate to run. Wide open asphalt in places like Texas, Nevada or the deserts of California come to mind. But sadly, we are sitting behind the wheel of the record-breaking jet black Alpha 12 in congested Santa Monica, California. To make lemonade out of our rather sour situation, our goal is to drive the modified GT-R north, up famed Pacific Coast Highway, to escape the bulk of the stop-and-go beach traffic. While we won’t be cracking triple-digits, we should be able to get a good sense of what this thing is all about.

We met the Alpha 12 in a dimly lit concrete parking structure under a Santa Monica hotel. To its credit, and despite all of the carbon-fiber add-ons, the black Nissan GT-R appears both tasteful and clean. Even compared to the other tame passenger vehicles in the garage, it didn’t appear ostentatious. After a splash of (racing?) fuel from a handy five-gallon container, I climbed into the driver’s seat..

Sitting to my right was Ivan Phipps, Special Projects Technician at AMS. Seriously multitalented, Ivan is as skilled with a wrench as he is behind the steering wheel, which made him the ideal co-pilot (Ivan was in the driver’s seat of the Alpha 12 for its record-setting quarter-mile run, and in another video losing control – and recovering – at over 200 mph).

Everything, including the automatic climate control, still works as it did from the factory.

Following the tone set by the exterior, the cabin of the Alpha 12 will appear virtually stock unless the customer orders extras such as race bucket seats, harnesses or a roll cage. In fact, with the exception of some of the non-working telemetry on the center stack computer (some of the sensors are confused by the modified fuel injection and new engine mapping), everything, including the automatic climate control, still works as it did from the factory. Furthermore, and serving as a testament to its streetability, all functional controls work exactly as they do on a stock GT-R.

With a press of the ‘start’ button, the freely breathing 4.0-liter V6 barked to life and sent a concussion wave bouncing off the walls of the parking garage. Idle was smooth, but the raspy and aggressive exhaust note coming out of the enlarged tailpipes was delivering clues that everything wasn’t normal. The Alpha 12 will operate in full automatic mode just like any stock GT-R, but Ivan explained up front that he preferred to shift the dual-clutch gearbox manually with the steering wheel-mounted paddles. Ignoring his suggestion, I left everything in automatic mode and pulled out of the parking garage.

I had covered no more than a quarter mile when Ivan’s comment immediately made sense. The heavily modified gearbox, designed to handle upwards of 1,000 pounds-feet of torque, was brutally deliberate in its fully automatic engagement – uncomfortably so. After a few minutes of taking the abuse, I heeded my passenger’s advice and began to shift manually with the column-mounted paddles. There was more too it, though, as the manual-mode shifts still felt as if we were being rear-ended by a 40-ton anvil with each gear change. After some experimentation, I discovered the trick to driving the Alpha 12 smoothly. By lifting off the accelerator slightly between shifts (just like you would do when clutching with a manual gearbox), engagement of the next gear was smooth.

Don’t get the impression that an Alpha 12 is a docile pussycat. Its mannerisms are much harsher than a stock GT-R.

Don’t get the impression that an Alpha 12 is a docile pussycat. In fact, its mannerisms are much harsher than a stock GT-R. To handle its outrageous output, AMS has fitted some seriously heavy-duty components. Most are buried within, but some (like the high-volume free-flow exhaust and the differential oil pump with straight-cut gears) operate much louder than stock mechanicals. To a true gearhead, one who can identify the din, the sound is oddly reassuring.

As AMS has left the stock Brembo brakes and multi-mode electrically adjustable damping suspension in place (no need to add unnecessary complexity), the ride remains every bit as compliant and comfortable as a stock GT-R. For street use and occasional drag racing this is probably just fine, but I would upgrade the brake pads at minimum if road-racing track duty is on the agenda.

Posted by Mr_Pictures on 2014-09-01 20:42:38

Tagged: , 2012 , AMS , Alpha , 12 , GT-R

2012 AMS Alpha 12 GT-R

2012 AMS Alpha 12 GT-R

Horsepower is highly addictive. As automotive enthusiasts, we crave it insatiably.

Each time we place ourselves behind the wheel of a vehicle, a brief moment arrives when we wish for just a little more potency. Whether driving a 138-horsepower Kia Rio or a 638-horsepower Chevrolet Corvette ZR1, there is always an instant when the initial rush begins to slow and we ache for just a little bit more.

But what if it were possible to have too much power? What if there were a vehicle that satisfied our desire so completely, to the point where we were overwhelmed (think along the lines of sweet-tooth Augustus Gloop swimming in Willy Wonka’s river of chocolate)? Would we finally stop thirsting for more?

To solve the riddle, we tracked down the fiendish Alpha 12 GT-R by AMS Performance. It is not just the quickest accelerating street-legal car that Autoblog has ever driven. With a quarter-mile time of 8.975 seconds at 169.49 miles per hour, it is likely the quickest street-legal volume-produced tuner vehicle on the planet.

Founded in early 2001, AMS Performance is no stranger to horsepower. One of the company’s first projects was tweaking Ford’s turbocharged 2.3-liter under the hood of the (under-appreciated) Merkur XR4Ti. It wasn’t long before the team, led by Martin Musial, began tooling on more capable cars like the Mitsubishi Evolution VIII and Nissan 240SX. By 2007, the company had moved to a facility in West Chicago and its competition-only AMS drag car had captured the title as the "World’s Quickest Evo VIII." In 2009, AMS expanded its portfolio and began to focus on a wider variety of sports cars from Porsche, BMW, Hyundai and Nissan.

Then the Alpha 12 was developed – it is, in three simple words, Godzilla on crack.

But it was the Nissan GT-R (aka "Godzilla") that really captured the company’s attention. Despite being blazingly fast right off the showroom floor, AMS developed and refined the car to deliver even quicker acceleration. World records fell as its Alpha 6, Alpha 9 and Alpha 10 models devoured the competition at drag strips and on racing circuits. But then the Alpha 12 was developed – it is, in three simple words, Godzilla on crack.

Transforming a GT-R into an Alpha 12 is involved. After customers supply AMS with a donor R35 GT-R (new or used), the stock powertrain is surgically pulled and the metamorphosis begins. The OEM 3.8-liter VR38DETT V6 block is bored out to 4.0-liters of displacement, reinforced, and then fitted with an AMS Alpha CNC race ported cylinder head with AMS custom camshafts, AMS injectors, AMS MAP sensors and more. The stock turbochargers are ditched and replaced with an AMS Alpha 12 Turbo Kit, and an AMS intercooler and pipes are installed to reduce the charge temperature. The entire exhaust, from downpipes to the muffler, is then replaced with high-flow componentry. Lastly, the stock gearbox is upgraded with PPG and Dodson components and the differential is fitted with a high capacity oil cooler. What finally emerges is a balanced and blueprinted AMS Alpha 4.0L Race Engine.

Locate a dynamometer that can handle it and the Alpha 12 will show you 1,100 horsepower and 900 pound-feet of torque on 93 octane unleaded. Pump in some racing fuel, and those numbers rise to 1,500 horsepower and 1,050 pound-feet of torque. The figures are dizzying, but they speak for themselves. The 0-60 sprint takes 2.4 seconds. More spectacular is the acceleration from 60-130 mph. The Alpha 12 does it in just 3.31 seconds. In the aforementioned quarter mile, a range-topping Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport (almost a second slower in the benchmark) would be left choking on its dust.

Locate a dynamometer that can handle it and the Alpha 12 will show you 1,100 hp and 900 lb-ft of torque on 93 octane unleaded.

Understandably, a car like this needs some serious real estate to run. Wide open asphalt in places like Texas, Nevada or the deserts of California come to mind. But sadly, we are sitting behind the wheel of the record-breaking jet black Alpha 12 in congested Santa Monica, California. To make lemonade out of our rather sour situation, our goal is to drive the modified GT-R north, up famed Pacific Coast Highway, to escape the bulk of the stop-and-go beach traffic. While we won’t be cracking triple-digits, we should be able to get a good sense of what this thing is all about.

We met the Alpha 12 in a dimly lit concrete parking structure under a Santa Monica hotel. To its credit, and despite all of the carbon-fiber add-ons, the black Nissan GT-R appears both tasteful and clean. Even compared to the other tame passenger vehicles in the garage, it didn’t appear ostentatious. After a splash of (racing?) fuel from a handy five-gallon container, I climbed into the driver’s seat..

Sitting to my right was Ivan Phipps, Special Projects Technician at AMS. Seriously multitalented, Ivan is as skilled with a wrench as he is behind the steering wheel, which made him the ideal co-pilot (Ivan was in the driver’s seat of the Alpha 12 for its record-setting quarter-mile run, and in another video losing control – and recovering – at over 200 mph).

Everything, including the automatic climate control, still works as it did from the factory.

Following the tone set by the exterior, the cabin of the Alpha 12 will appear virtually stock unless the customer orders extras such as race bucket seats, harnesses or a roll cage. In fact, with the exception of some of the non-working telemetry on the center stack computer (some of the sensors are confused by the modified fuel injection and new engine mapping), everything, including the automatic climate control, still works as it did from the factory. Furthermore, and serving as a testament to its streetability, all functional controls work exactly as they do on a stock GT-R.

With a press of the ‘start’ button, the freely breathing 4.0-liter V6 barked to life and sent a concussion wave bouncing off the walls of the parking garage. Idle was smooth, but the raspy and aggressive exhaust note coming out of the enlarged tailpipes was delivering clues that everything wasn’t normal. The Alpha 12 will operate in full automatic mode just like any stock GT-R, but Ivan explained up front that he preferred to shift the dual-clutch gearbox manually with the steering wheel-mounted paddles. Ignoring his suggestion, I left everything in automatic mode and pulled out of the parking garage.

I had covered no more than a quarter mile when Ivan’s comment immediately made sense. The heavily modified gearbox, designed to handle upwards of 1,000 pounds-feet of torque, was brutally deliberate in its fully automatic engagement – uncomfortably so. After a few minutes of taking the abuse, I heeded my passenger’s advice and began to shift manually with the column-mounted paddles. There was more too it, though, as the manual-mode shifts still felt as if we were being rear-ended by a 40-ton anvil with each gear change. After some experimentation, I discovered the trick to driving the Alpha 12 smoothly. By lifting off the accelerator slightly between shifts (just like you would do when clutching with a manual gearbox), engagement of the next gear was smooth.

Don’t get the impression that an Alpha 12 is a docile pussycat. Its mannerisms are much harsher than a stock GT-R.

Don’t get the impression that an Alpha 12 is a docile pussycat. In fact, its mannerisms are much harsher than a stock GT-R. To handle its outrageous output, AMS has fitted some seriously heavy-duty components. Most are buried within, but some (like the high-volume free-flow exhaust and the differential oil pump with straight-cut gears) operate much louder than stock mechanicals. To a true gearhead, one who can identify the din, the sound is oddly reassuring.

As AMS has left the stock Brembo brakes and multi-mode electrically adjustable damping suspension in place (no need to add unnecessary complexity), the ride remains every bit as compliant and comfortable as a stock GT-R. For street use and occasional drag racing this is probably just fine, but I would upgrade the brake pads at minimum if road-racing track duty is on the agenda.

Posted by Mr_Pictures on 2014-09-01 20:42:53

Tagged: , 2012 , AMS , Alpha , 12 , GT-R

2012 AMS Alpha 12 GT-R

2012 AMS Alpha 12 GT-R

Horsepower is highly addictive. As automotive enthusiasts, we crave it insatiably.

Each time we place ourselves behind the wheel of a vehicle, a brief moment arrives when we wish for just a little more potency. Whether driving a 138-horsepower Kia Rio or a 638-horsepower Chevrolet Corvette ZR1, there is always an instant when the initial rush begins to slow and we ache for just a little bit more.

But what if it were possible to have too much power? What if there were a vehicle that satisfied our desire so completely, to the point where we were overwhelmed (think along the lines of sweet-tooth Augustus Gloop swimming in Willy Wonka’s river of chocolate)? Would we finally stop thirsting for more?

To solve the riddle, we tracked down the fiendish Alpha 12 GT-R by AMS Performance. It is not just the quickest accelerating street-legal car that Autoblog has ever driven. With a quarter-mile time of 8.975 seconds at 169.49 miles per hour, it is likely the quickest street-legal volume-produced tuner vehicle on the planet.

Founded in early 2001, AMS Performance is no stranger to horsepower. One of the company’s first projects was tweaking Ford’s turbocharged 2.3-liter under the hood of the (under-appreciated) Merkur XR4Ti. It wasn’t long before the team, led by Martin Musial, began tooling on more capable cars like the Mitsubishi Evolution VIII and Nissan 240SX. By 2007, the company had moved to a facility in West Chicago and its competition-only AMS drag car had captured the title as the "World’s Quickest Evo VIII." In 2009, AMS expanded its portfolio and began to focus on a wider variety of sports cars from Porsche, BMW, Hyundai and Nissan.

Then the Alpha 12 was developed – it is, in three simple words, Godzilla on crack.

But it was the Nissan GT-R (aka "Godzilla") that really captured the company’s attention. Despite being blazingly fast right off the showroom floor, AMS developed and refined the car to deliver even quicker acceleration. World records fell as its Alpha 6, Alpha 9 and Alpha 10 models devoured the competition at drag strips and on racing circuits. But then the Alpha 12 was developed – it is, in three simple words, Godzilla on crack.

Transforming a GT-R into an Alpha 12 is involved. After customers supply AMS with a donor R35 GT-R (new or used), the stock powertrain is surgically pulled and the metamorphosis begins. The OEM 3.8-liter VR38DETT V6 block is bored out to 4.0-liters of displacement, reinforced, and then fitted with an AMS Alpha CNC race ported cylinder head with AMS custom camshafts, AMS injectors, AMS MAP sensors and more. The stock turbochargers are ditched and replaced with an AMS Alpha 12 Turbo Kit, and an AMS intercooler and pipes are installed to reduce the charge temperature. The entire exhaust, from downpipes to the muffler, is then replaced with high-flow componentry. Lastly, the stock gearbox is upgraded with PPG and Dodson components and the differential is fitted with a high capacity oil cooler. What finally emerges is a balanced and blueprinted AMS Alpha 4.0L Race Engine.

Locate a dynamometer that can handle it and the Alpha 12 will show you 1,100 horsepower and 900 pound-feet of torque on 93 octane unleaded. Pump in some racing fuel, and those numbers rise to 1,500 horsepower and 1,050 pound-feet of torque. The figures are dizzying, but they speak for themselves. The 0-60 sprint takes 2.4 seconds. More spectacular is the acceleration from 60-130 mph. The Alpha 12 does it in just 3.31 seconds. In the aforementioned quarter mile, a range-topping Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport (almost a second slower in the benchmark) would be left choking on its dust.

Locate a dynamometer that can handle it and the Alpha 12 will show you 1,100 hp and 900 lb-ft of torque on 93 octane unleaded.

Understandably, a car like this needs some serious real estate to run. Wide open asphalt in places like Texas, Nevada or the deserts of California come to mind. But sadly, we are sitting behind the wheel of the record-breaking jet black Alpha 12 in congested Santa Monica, California. To make lemonade out of our rather sour situation, our goal is to drive the modified GT-R north, up famed Pacific Coast Highway, to escape the bulk of the stop-and-go beach traffic. While we won’t be cracking triple-digits, we should be able to get a good sense of what this thing is all about.

We met the Alpha 12 in a dimly lit concrete parking structure under a Santa Monica hotel. To its credit, and despite all of the carbon-fiber add-ons, the black Nissan GT-R appears both tasteful and clean. Even compared to the other tame passenger vehicles in the garage, it didn’t appear ostentatious. After a splash of (racing?) fuel from a handy five-gallon container, I climbed into the driver’s seat..

Sitting to my right was Ivan Phipps, Special Projects Technician at AMS. Seriously multitalented, Ivan is as skilled with a wrench as he is behind the steering wheel, which made him the ideal co-pilot (Ivan was in the driver’s seat of the Alpha 12 for its record-setting quarter-mile run, and in another video losing control – and recovering – at over 200 mph).

Everything, including the automatic climate control, still works as it did from the factory.

Following the tone set by the exterior, the cabin of the Alpha 12 will appear virtually stock unless the customer orders extras such as race bucket seats, harnesses or a roll cage. In fact, with the exception of some of the non-working telemetry on the center stack computer (some of the sensors are confused by the modified fuel injection and new engine mapping), everything, including the automatic climate control, still works as it did from the factory. Furthermore, and serving as a testament to its streetability, all functional controls work exactly as they do on a stock GT-R.

With a press of the ‘start’ button, the freely breathing 4.0-liter V6 barked to life and sent a concussion wave bouncing off the walls of the parking garage. Idle was smooth, but the raspy and aggressive exhaust note coming out of the enlarged tailpipes was delivering clues that everything wasn’t normal. The Alpha 12 will operate in full automatic mode just like any stock GT-R, but Ivan explained up front that he preferred to shift the dual-clutch gearbox manually with the steering wheel-mounted paddles. Ignoring his suggestion, I left everything in automatic mode and pulled out of the parking garage.

I had covered no more than a quarter mile when Ivan’s comment immediately made sense. The heavily modified gearbox, designed to handle upwards of 1,000 pounds-feet of torque, was brutally deliberate in its fully automatic engagement – uncomfortably so. After a few minutes of taking the abuse, I heeded my passenger’s advice and began to shift manually with the column-mounted paddles. There was more too it, though, as the manual-mode shifts still felt as if we were being rear-ended by a 40-ton anvil with each gear change. After some experimentation, I discovered the trick to driving the Alpha 12 smoothly. By lifting off the accelerator slightly between shifts (just like you would do when clutching with a manual gearbox), engagement of the next gear was smooth.

Don’t get the impression that an Alpha 12 is a docile pussycat. Its mannerisms are much harsher than a stock GT-R.

Don’t get the impression that an Alpha 12 is a docile pussycat. In fact, its mannerisms are much harsher than a stock GT-R. To handle its outrageous output, AMS has fitted some seriously heavy-duty components. Most are buried within, but some (like the high-volume free-flow exhaust and the differential oil pump with straight-cut gears) operate much louder than stock mechanicals. To a true gearhead, one who can identify the din, the sound is oddly reassuring.

As AMS has left the stock Brembo brakes and multi-mode electrically adjustable damping suspension in place (no need to add unnecessary complexity), the ride remains every bit as compliant and comfortable as a stock GT-R. For street use and occasional drag racing this is probably just fine, but I would upgrade the brake pads at minimum if road-racing track duty is on the agenda.

Posted by Mr_Pictures on 2014-09-01 20:42:44

Tagged: , 2012 , AMS , Alpha , 12 , GT-R

2012 AMS Alpha 12 GT-R

2012 AMS Alpha 12 GT-R

Horsepower is highly addictive. As automotive enthusiasts, we crave it insatiably.

Each time we place ourselves behind the wheel of a vehicle, a brief moment arrives when we wish for just a little more potency. Whether driving a 138-horsepower Kia Rio or a 638-horsepower Chevrolet Corvette ZR1, there is always an instant when the initial rush begins to slow and we ache for just a little bit more.

But what if it were possible to have too much power? What if there were a vehicle that satisfied our desire so completely, to the point where we were overwhelmed (think along the lines of sweet-tooth Augustus Gloop swimming in Willy Wonka’s river of chocolate)? Would we finally stop thirsting for more?

To solve the riddle, we tracked down the fiendish Alpha 12 GT-R by AMS Performance. It is not just the quickest accelerating street-legal car that Autoblog has ever driven. With a quarter-mile time of 8.975 seconds at 169.49 miles per hour, it is likely the quickest street-legal volume-produced tuner vehicle on the planet.

Founded in early 2001, AMS Performance is no stranger to horsepower. One of the company’s first projects was tweaking Ford’s turbocharged 2.3-liter under the hood of the (under-appreciated) Merkur XR4Ti. It wasn’t long before the team, led by Martin Musial, began tooling on more capable cars like the Mitsubishi Evolution VIII and Nissan 240SX. By 2007, the company had moved to a facility in West Chicago and its competition-only AMS drag car had captured the title as the "World’s Quickest Evo VIII." In 2009, AMS expanded its portfolio and began to focus on a wider variety of sports cars from Porsche, BMW, Hyundai and Nissan.

Then the Alpha 12 was developed – it is, in three simple words, Godzilla on crack.

But it was the Nissan GT-R (aka "Godzilla") that really captured the company’s attention. Despite being blazingly fast right off the showroom floor, AMS developed and refined the car to deliver even quicker acceleration. World records fell as its Alpha 6, Alpha 9 and Alpha 10 models devoured the competition at drag strips and on racing circuits. But then the Alpha 12 was developed – it is, in three simple words, Godzilla on crack.

Transforming a GT-R into an Alpha 12 is involved. After customers supply AMS with a donor R35 GT-R (new or used), the stock powertrain is surgically pulled and the metamorphosis begins. The OEM 3.8-liter VR38DETT V6 block is bored out to 4.0-liters of displacement, reinforced, and then fitted with an AMS Alpha CNC race ported cylinder head with AMS custom camshafts, AMS injectors, AMS MAP sensors and more. The stock turbochargers are ditched and replaced with an AMS Alpha 12 Turbo Kit, and an AMS intercooler and pipes are installed to reduce the charge temperature. The entire exhaust, from downpipes to the muffler, is then replaced with high-flow componentry. Lastly, the stock gearbox is upgraded with PPG and Dodson components and the differential is fitted with a high capacity oil cooler. What finally emerges is a balanced and blueprinted AMS Alpha 4.0L Race Engine.

Locate a dynamometer that can handle it and the Alpha 12 will show you 1,100 horsepower and 900 pound-feet of torque on 93 octane unleaded. Pump in some racing fuel, and those numbers rise to 1,500 horsepower and 1,050 pound-feet of torque. The figures are dizzying, but they speak for themselves. The 0-60 sprint takes 2.4 seconds. More spectacular is the acceleration from 60-130 mph. The Alpha 12 does it in just 3.31 seconds. In the aforementioned quarter mile, a range-topping Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport (almost a second slower in the benchmark) would be left choking on its dust.

Locate a dynamometer that can handle it and the Alpha 12 will show you 1,100 hp and 900 lb-ft of torque on 93 octane unleaded.

Understandably, a car like this needs some serious real estate to run. Wide open asphalt in places like Texas, Nevada or the deserts of California come to mind. But sadly, we are sitting behind the wheel of the record-breaking jet black Alpha 12 in congested Santa Monica, California. To make lemonade out of our rather sour situation, our goal is to drive the modified GT-R north, up famed Pacific Coast Highway, to escape the bulk of the stop-and-go beach traffic. While we won’t be cracking triple-digits, we should be able to get a good sense of what this thing is all about.

We met the Alpha 12 in a dimly lit concrete parking structure under a Santa Monica hotel. To its credit, and despite all of the carbon-fiber add-ons, the black Nissan GT-R appears both tasteful and clean. Even compared to the other tame passenger vehicles in the garage, it didn’t appear ostentatious. After a splash of (racing?) fuel from a handy five-gallon container, I climbed into the driver’s seat..

Sitting to my right was Ivan Phipps, Special Projects Technician at AMS. Seriously multitalented, Ivan is as skilled with a wrench as he is behind the steering wheel, which made him the ideal co-pilot (Ivan was in the driver’s seat of the Alpha 12 for its record-setting quarter-mile run, and in another video losing control – and recovering – at over 200 mph).

Everything, including the automatic climate control, still works as it did from the factory.

Following the tone set by the exterior, the cabin of the Alpha 12 will appear virtually stock unless the customer orders extras such as race bucket seats, harnesses or a roll cage. In fact, with the exception of some of the non-working telemetry on the center stack computer (some of the sensors are confused by the modified fuel injection and new engine mapping), everything, including the automatic climate control, still works as it did from the factory. Furthermore, and serving as a testament to its streetability, all functional controls work exactly as they do on a stock GT-R.

With a press of the ‘start’ button, the freely breathing 4.0-liter V6 barked to life and sent a concussion wave bouncing off the walls of the parking garage. Idle was smooth, but the raspy and aggressive exhaust note coming out of the enlarged tailpipes was delivering clues that everything wasn’t normal. The Alpha 12 will operate in full automatic mode just like any stock GT-R, but Ivan explained up front that he preferred to shift the dual-clutch gearbox manually with the steering wheel-mounted paddles. Ignoring his suggestion, I left everything in automatic mode and pulled out of the parking garage.

I had covered no more than a quarter mile when Ivan’s comment immediately made sense. The heavily modified gearbox, designed to handle upwards of 1,000 pounds-feet of torque, was brutally deliberate in its fully automatic engagement – uncomfortably so. After a few minutes of taking the abuse, I heeded my passenger’s advice and began to shift manually with the column-mounted paddles. There was more too it, though, as the manual-mode shifts still felt as if we were being rear-ended by a 40-ton anvil with each gear change. After some experimentation, I discovered the trick to driving the Alpha 12 smoothly. By lifting off the accelerator slightly between shifts (just like you would do when clutching with a manual gearbox), engagement of the next gear was smooth.

Don’t get the impression that an Alpha 12 is a docile pussycat. Its mannerisms are much harsher than a stock GT-R.

Don’t get the impression that an Alpha 12 is a docile pussycat. In fact, its mannerisms are much harsher than a stock GT-R. To handle its outrageous output, AMS has fitted some seriously heavy-duty components. Most are buried within, but some (like the high-volume free-flow exhaust and the differential oil pump with straight-cut gears) operate much louder than stock mechanicals. To a true gearhead, one who can identify the din, the sound is oddly reassuring.

As AMS has left the stock Brembo brakes and multi-mode electrically adjustable damping suspension in place (no need to add unnecessary complexity), the ride remains every bit as compliant and comfortable as a stock GT-R. For street use and occasional drag racing this is probably just fine, but I would upgrade the brake pads at minimum if road-racing track duty is on the agenda.

Posted by Mr_Pictures on 2014-09-01 20:42:35

Tagged: , 2012 , AMS , Alpha , 12 , GT-R

2012 China Will Become The World’s Largest Urban Rail Transit Market – Mass Transit, Subway,

2012 China Will Become The World’s Largest Urban Rail Transit Market – Mass Transit, Subway,
According to the Chinese national standard “terminology commonly used in urban public transport” is defined, urban rail transit is usually electric-powered, wheel-rail operation mode to the rapid and large capacity public transport in general. Common types of urban rail transit subway (Metro / Subway), light (Lightrail), Monorail (Monorail) and tram (Tram), which often appear in the single-track in southwest China, tram and more concentrated in the northern region.

Since the first subway line in London, the level of development of urban rail transit on behalf of the city to some extent the level of modernization. According to the National Bureau of Statistics, the total population of urban residents in China to grow at a rate of 3.4% per year, while civilian car ownership is the annual average growth rate reached 16.0%, which means that China’s urban transport situation is faced with severe challenges. Compared to other modes of public transport, urban rail transit has large capacity, low power, high speed, high security and other significant advantages, which has met the needs of modern urban construction, which is highly progressive urban rail transit concern.

The late 90s in the last century, a time when the Chinese government in order to prevent excessive investment, once halted a series of urban rail transit construction projects. The silent period lasted until 2005, the Government began to re-examine the need for urban rail transit construction, and introduced a “priority development of urban public transport on the views of” the relevant local governments to put in place to encourage the urban rail transit construction plan, a clear urban Rail traffic on the global impact of urban development. In response to the global financial crisis in 2008, the Chinese government implemented a package of economic stimulus, including the vigorous development of urban rail transit. In August 2009, the State Council approved the 22 approved the city’s subway construction plan, the total construction length of about 2,500 kilometers, the total investment is expected to nearly 9,000 billion yuan.

General Office of the State Council in 2003 released “on the strengthening of urban rail transit construction management notice” requirement, to declare the development of metro cities should meet the following basic conditions: the local general budget revenue of 100 billion yuan, China GDP reached 1,000 billion yuan, urban population of 300 million people. It is estimated that the country can achieve a number of requirements that are about 40 cities. Currently, 27 cities have developed a clear urban rail transit planning, and some other cities are also in the process of development.

At the end of 2009, China’s urban rail transit operators in total mileage up to 1,038.7 km, is located after the United States, ranking second in the world. According to Frost & Sullivan forecast that China in the next 5 years, each building will be more than 500 km mileage, and maintain a compound growth rate of 13.4%. This means that China will overtake the U.S. in 2012 to become the world’s largest rail market.

According to Frost & Sullivan’s calculations, China’s average per km of urban rail transit construction of about 400 million yuan of investment, so the next five years, China’s total investment in urban rail transport will reach 1.5 trillion yuan.

The cost of urban rail transit terms of the structure, engineering design consulting and management fees of approximately 8% of the total cost, land acquisition and housing demolition of about 14% of the total cost of civil works costs can account for half of the remaining part is related to equipment purchase and installation costs, of which about 6% of installation costs, equipment purchase costs account for 22%.

Urban rail transit construction is a huge project, involving many systems and equipment, in accordance with the normal budgeting can be divided into the following components: 1) vehicle, the purchase of equipment purchased about 30% to 40 %; 2) communication and signal systems, primarily by private communication, consumer communications, public security communication and signal systems constitute about 20% of equipment form; 3) power supply system, primarily by changing

Power Equipment
, Catenary, lighting and power monitoring equipment, constitute about 15% of equipment costs; 4) station auxiliary equipment, including escalators, elevators and security gates, about 11% of equipment costs; 5), ventilation and air conditioning systems, mainly chillers, fans, air conditioning units, etc., and about 6% of equipment costs; 6) ticketing system, the automatic ticketing system and fare collection system constitute about 6% of equipment costs; 7) other systems, including comprehensive monitoring system and fire protection, access control systems form.

I am an expert from chinadrillingequipment.com, while we provides the quality product, such as Hydraulic Piling Rig Manufacturer , CFA Equipment Manufacturer,

Related Replicant Urbanism Articles

067 of 366 rain

067 of 366 rain

What a difference a day makes, weather-wise, at least.

I was doing some quiet dyslexia work on the computer this morning, while Mike recorded some ladies from his church, reading a drama. May have to do some cleaning, now I can make a noise!

PS Later the sun came out again, and I only did a bit of light dusting (no, that doesn’t mean I dusted my lights!). Just thought you’d like to know. Actually, that’s not true 😉

Posted by Margaret Stranks on 2012-03-07 13:27:26

Tagged: , 067/366 , 365days , 2012 , rain , window

Urbanization of Africa becomes a key point in World Economic Forum on Africa 2012

Urbanization of Africa becomes a key point in World Economic Forum on Africa 2012

World Economic Forum on Africa 2012 has been ended on May 11th in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. According to the report of Muhammad Ali Pate, Minister of State for Health of Nigeria, urbanization of Africa will become a major issue because of the tremendous pressure cities face with respect to population growth.

According to a new French analysis of demographic trends, there is only one city of Africa that had 1 million residents in 1960, now, there are 40, and the rural exodus is continuing at such a pace that already strained cities are struggling to provide services, like health care, and infrastructure, like sewage treatment, enough to support the population growth.

Urbanization is a global problem, especially for Africa, with several complicated issues which is essential for further economic growth. From planning a city to caring for its inhabitants; the urban environment holds challenges and potential for economic and social positive change.

“There exists urgent need of improving the living condition and healthy, and rebuild of infrastructure is a main guarantee for this.”Zhong Jianhua, China’s special representative for African Affairs said to reporters, “China will always be a main partner of Africa, and we are planning to sign contracts about the infrastructure of Sub-Saharan Africa, which is headed for a ‘population emergency’”.

As for the cooperate companies, China government has strict demand on these , high technology, environment-protecting and working safety are the main conditions, and DSMAC ,China leading construction manufacture, has be chose as the first one for its record of zero incidents, high working efficiency and no harm for the environment.

Urban growth is a continuing problem that will affect Africa cities without proper city planning, so the construction cooperation should be paid attention, if Africa can solve the issue effectively, the economic will run at an amazing speed

“I feel very grateful for China government offering assistant projects, like the low financing or concessional loans for infrastructure projects, large economic investments, etc. Thus offer great help to the local economic development. In the future, more trade activities will be host between us and mutual development is always our goal. ”said Blade Nzimande.

Fats showed that Chinese investment can not only promoted Africa’s economic development and transformation, but also to promote social harmony and political stability.

“According to the SAIIA, China in Africa research project investigator, China has been regarded as the third largest trading partner Of Africa, after the European Union and the United States, however, it will becoming a top trading partner to Africa soon.” Lu Hong Bo, a senior engineer of DSMAC Group, vice-president of China Gravel Association and China Foundry Association said.

By 2011, Chinese investment in Africa reached 92.8 billion yuan (US$ 14.7 billion), covering mainly finance, mining, manufacturing, agriculture and construction, according to the Ministry of Commerce. Nearly 70% of PRC infrastructure financing on the continent reportedly is concentrated in Angola, Nigeria, Ethiopia, and Sudan, etc.

Zhong Jianhua, China’s special representative for African Affairs, said: “As Africa has made its effective way of developing, China will add its investment on the infrastructure of Africa and more projects will be seen on Africa land. At the meantime, government also set SMEspecial loan in Africa, many famous domestic infrastructure related companies will be listed on the plan, like Sweett, DSMAC, China Construction First Building(Group) corporation limited, Liming, etc.”

Africa is still on the way of developing, especially of its infrastructure, and there is no doubt that the world economy, a growth point in Africa, should do to prepare forAfrica’s economic development soar.
 

hydraulic cone crusher,LARGEST HAMMER CRUSHER OR IMPACT CRUSHER BY PRODUCTED stone crusher for sale in DSMAC

Find More Replicant Urbanism Articles