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William Shatner, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2018-11-09 20:48:51

Tagged: , William Shatner , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll

Mariette Hartley, Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2018-11-09 20:48:51

Tagged: , Leonard Nimoy , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll , Mariette Hartley , actress , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , niña bonita , hübsches Mädchen , hübsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , hair , hair style , atriz , woman , girl , schön , lady

Mariette Hartley, Leonard Nimoy, DeForest Kelley, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2018-11-09 20:48:51

Tagged: , Leonard Nimoy , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll , Mariette Hartley , actress , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , niña bonita , hübsches Mädchen , hübsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , hair , hair style , atriz , woman , girl , schön , lady , DeForest Kelley

Mariette Hartley, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2018-11-09 20:48:51

Tagged: , Mariette Hartley , Star Trek , television , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , actress , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , niña bonita , nostalgic , nostalgia , hübsches Mädchen , hübsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , celebrity , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , American , USA , añejo , época , clásico , hair , hair style , fashion , Hollywood , atriz , ephemeral , woman , girl , schön , old , lady , jahrgang , alt , oll

Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2018-11-09 20:48:52

Tagged: , Leonard Nimoy , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll

Ian Wolfe, Leonard Nimoy, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2018-11-09 20:48:53

Tagged: , Leonard Nimoy , Star Trek , Ian Wolfe , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll

Kermit Murdock, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2018-11-09 20:48:50

Tagged: , Star Trek , Kermit Murdock , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , hat , ropa , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll

William Shatner, Anna Karen, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

********
Fair Use Doctrine; if you use this photo, please provide attribution credit; not for commercial use (see Creative Commons license).

Posted by classic_film on 2018-11-09 20:48:51

Tagged: , William Shatner , Star Trek , television , actor , 1960s , sixties , 1969 , science fiction , sci-fi , TV , nostalgic , nostalgia , acteur , akteur , man , vintage , retro , classic , color , entertainment , America , United States , Hollywood , American , USA , añejo , época , aktor , celebrity , ephemeral , old , clásico , hat , kleidung , clothing , clothes , fashion , technology , jahrgang , alt , oll , Anna Karen , actress , beauty , beautiful , pretty girl , pretty , mujer bonita , niña bonita , hübsches Mädchen , hübsche Frau , sexy , sensuous , frau , Schauspielerin , actriz , mujer , Aktrice , actrice , hair , hair style , atriz , woman , girl , schön , lady

Mariette Hartley, Leonard Nimoy, The Kiss, Star Trek TOS,

Star Trek (The Original Series)
Season 3, Episode 23, "All Our Yesterdays"
Original U.S. broadcast date: March 14, 1969

Synopsis, via IMDb:
When Kirk, Spock, and McCoy investigate the disappearance of a doomed planet’s population, they find themselves trapped in different periods of that world’s past.

Guest stars in this episode included Mariette Hartley (b. June 21, 1940), Ian Wolfe (November 4, 1896 – January 23, 1992), and Kermit Murdock (March 20, 1908 – Februrary 11, 1981).

Some trivia about this episode, via IMDb:
Part of the set depicting the surface of the ice age planet where Spock & McCoy are transported was recycled from the MGM film ‘Ice Station Zebra,’ made the previous year.
 
The title is taken from "Macbeth" by William Shakespeare, Act 5, Scene 5: The title character speaks "Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow, / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day / To the last syllable of recorded time, / And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death."
 
This is the only episode of Star Trek not to feature any scenes set aboard the Enterprise. George Takei, Nichelle Nichols, and Walter Koenig do not appear in this episode. James Doohan does not appear on screen, but has several voice-over lines. In no other episode are only three regular members of the crew seen in person.
 
Mariette Hartley (Zarabeth) was not allowed to show her belly-button in this episode, despite the appearances of other navels in previous episodes. To comment on this censorship, Gene Roddenberry gave Hartley’s character two navels in his pilot, "Genesis II," stating that "the network owed me one."
 
The Atavachron computer used by Mr. Atoz is the same one as used by Gary Seven in Star Trek: Assignment: Earth (1968).
 
When Spock tries to use his phaser to warm a boulder at the base of the ice cliff, it doesn’t work – presumably because phasers didn’t exist in that time period. But, when he lays McCoy out in Zarabeth’s cave and examines him, the doctor’s medical tricorder seems to work just fine.
 
The stock footage showing the endless snow fields on the disc McCoy watches was also used as the surface of Exo III in "What Are Little Girls Made Of?".
 
Virtuoso jazz fusion guitar legend Alan Holdsworth, a big Trek fan, has an album released in 1986 named "Atavachron." One of the tracks is called "All Our Yesterdays." The cover art features Allan in Star Trek uniform.
 
The sound effect used for the Atavachron is the experimental time code broadcast by radio stations WWV and WWVH in the 1960s. A time code seems appropriate for a time machine.
 
The name of the librarian Mr. Atoz is a play on the phrase "A to Z." Author Jean Lisette Aroeste was a UCLA librarian at the time she wrote this script.
 
According to the stardate this episode is chronologically the last of the series, even though its production number and air date are earlier than "Turnabout Intruder." This is, therefore, the last voyage of the USS Enterprise in the original series. This is also the last time travel episode of the original series.

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Posted by classic_film on 2018-11-09 20:48:49

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What You Know About Relaxing Music Scenery And What You Don’t Know About Relaxing Music Scenery | relaxing music scenery

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They say it takes a absolute of four days, eight hours and 24 account to wholly relax on anniversary but as anon as you footfall into Salobre Hotel Resort and Serenity’s light-flooded lobby, greeted with a bottle of champagne, you feel as zen as the admirable advisers who assignment there.

Gran Canaria’s Salobre Hotel and Golf Resort was re-launched this summer to become an absolute wellness retreat, accouterment new techniques of alleviation a world-class spa experience.

Structured beyond 10 floors of the island’s aerial area and with a best of seven bright clear pond pools, guests can chase the sunshine from aurora to dusk and ample their canicule with yoga, Pilates, abundance biking and, of course, golf.

The resort boasts two 18-hole golf courses as one of its capital attractions, but what’s on action aural the resort is aloof as comfortable – booty a look…

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The beauteous resort overlooks Gran Canaria’s attractive mountainside[PH]

Each allowance is busy to accommodate a faculty of tranquility[PH]

From walking to ambit training, Salobre offers an action for anniversary and everyone’s fettle goals. Wake up aboriginal to go active or balmy up in the beginning morning sun with a 9am sun salutation.

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Head to the gym for the Fettle Ball chic or Abs Exercises, or dip in the basin on the seventh attic for an in-water bike chic or aquastretch.

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Each allowance has attractive angle of the island[PH]

Salobre has a whopping seven pond pools[PH]

After authoritative the best of Salobre’s amaranthine account of activities, there are affluence of places to bang aback and about-face off.

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With seven pools – including one in a top abstruse mountainside area – you’re besmirched for choice. But no amount area you alpha your sunbathing session, you accept to end it at the appropriately called Dusk Lounge.

The Dusk Lounge sits aloft the accomplished point of Salobre’s resort and is adorned with Balinese beds on the hillside, while a blush river snakes amid the rows of sun loungers surrounding the pool. Sip on abstracted Pina Coladas as you watch the dusk over the sea.

Gran Canaria has the world’s purest aloe vera, so booking in for the Aloe Ritual Beating at Be Aloe is a must. Using dehydrated aloe and agitable stones to acclaim addict abroad asleep bark afore a abounding anatomy beating with authentic aloe vera, you’ll leave the spa with the softest bark you’ll accept anytime acquainted and not a adulteration larboard in your body.

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Salobre’s spa provides luxurious massages[PH]

Unwind in Aloe’s Wellness Centre[PH]

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You’re again accustomed a alcohol of beginning angel abstract acicular with aloe vera to re-balance your energy.

Unwind at Be Aloe for a few added hours to acquaintance the Wellness Centre – with a sauna, beef allowance and an oxygen allowance 99.9 per cent chargeless of dust, bacilli and toxins, to leave you activity thoroughly apple-pie both central and out.

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There are a cardinal of places to banquet at Salobre [PH]

Salobre’s S Club has alive music until 1am [Salobre]

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In the mornings the Sens kitchen patio bar offers the ultimate breakfast of dreams – from fry-ups and pastries to omelettes and smoothies. You can alike aces up a bottle of champagne.

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Venture bottomward to Bank Point for a change of scenery[PH]

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Prices alpha from €139 per night for a bifold allowance B&B. Salobre Hotel Resort & Serenity Urbanización Salobre, s/nº. 35100 Maspalomas (Las Palmas de Gran Canaria)

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