“Amercian Hustle” redux

American Hustle -Act 2014
-John Grant review excerpt

The political and economic climate in which American Hustle is set is the period just before Ronald Reagan strides into town as a second string actor with an agenda to save America from the sludge pit of malaise. You know how the paean goes: He rode into town on a white horse and returned America to its true glory as a “shining city on a hill.” America had picked up the baton of failing western colonialism and it was now ready to finally win the Cold War and save the world from the communist menace following that great struggle in Vietnam.

That history, of course, was never only about beating the communists. It was also about Manifest Destiny and extending the Myth of American Exceptionalism, a drive that reached back to include the genocide of Native Americans and the enslavement of Africans, two immense enterprises all good Americans now either damn (slavery) or don’t like to think about (the slaughter of all those Indians).

Americans are incapable of holding themselves accountable. We don’t have a reverse gear in our national gearbox; we always get over messes by assuming blinders and moving forward. We may slowly realize we’ve gone a bit too far and, tragically, slaughtered a bit too many people in pursuit of some self-justified crusade — or maybe we destroyed something we quite nicely demonized before we realized the demonization was a bit too heavy-handed and, well, not actually justified. Like Chris Christie actually just did, we say, “Sure, mistakes were made.” But we never dwell on the negative. It’s un-American to do so. Like the shark that must keep moving lest oxygenated water be prevented from rushing through its gills, Americans have to move forward. It’s in our DNA. America may stumble, but it gets up and brushes the dust off its immense power and sets off forward with new goals and new dragons to slay.

This is how change happens in America — on the wreckage left behind.

To address the failures of Vietnam, Iraq and Afghanistan, we have changed our doctrine of warfare significantly from massive armies to the precision of drone strikes and special ops raids. The same goes for the nation’s domestic politics. Instead of wars on poverty, which we’re told only encourage more poverty, we have the aggressive and hungry prosecutor. Instead of addressing the heart of an issue, the prosecutor criminalizes and assaults the leaders and the go-to people who symbolize a problem.

We read regularly of wrongly imprisoned inmates who gain their freedom after serving multiple years in prison. It has become a cliché story. Often a prosecutor must sign off on releasing these men and women. And too often, in order to get that prosecutor to agree, the inmate must sign away his rights to hold the prosecutor accountable for things like withholding evidence of innocence or utilizing blatantly false confessions — things that are criminal in themselves.

It’s this kind of corrupt game that American Hustle turns on its head and has fun with. It’s made clear in the film that those actually caught in the FBI scam are small fish. The really big corrupt fish are too hard to land. They’re also likely too tied in with government. What the FBI scam in the movie amounts to is a dirty little deal that winnows out a few rotten apples while it advances the career of a lean and hungry US attorney.

None of the scamming acts in the film really matter, except to the individuals involved. The money and power merry-go-round keeps on going. I won’t give the film’s ending away, except to say that love wins. Sort of. And individual human redemption is possible. Sort of. Of all the elements in play, the federal prosecution team comes out smelling the worst.

The film left me with the idea that corruption and abuse of power — not left or right ideologies — is the true enemy in American politics. Since the Reagan Revolution and the rise of today’s hi-tech, computer-based financial carnival, we’ve arrived at a moment in history where, thanks to Citizens United and the rest, bribery has essentially been made legal. Back in the late seventies, Ozzie Myers could never have imagined how right-on he was when he told the scammers on tape, “In this town, money talks and bullshit walks.”

So, no, this is not a call to eliminate prosecutors. After all, who would be around to run Brit Hume’s [1] manly tough guy Chris Christie to ground for his Soprano-land strong-arm politics.

Michelle Alexander in The New Jim Crow exposes decades of racially-focused prosecutorial abuses connected to the Drug War that have filled our jails with African Americans. New York Mayor Bill de Blasio and others may be beginning to turn some of that around.

The political spirit that imbues American Hustle is very human, pragmatic and mature. It accepts the idea that corruption is an unavoidable part of life that begins the moment the doc slaps us on the ass, and it does not end until we’re lowered into the grave. This is the fact of life that empowers the archetypal abusive prosecutor by giving him or her the power of selective enforcement. The rest is up to the brilliance of their conniving souls.

A key part of this pragmatic political spirit is forgiveness. Specifically, that includes developing workable, realistic re-entry programs for incarcerated inmates that overcomes stigmatization. We especially need to counter prosecutorial arrogance. As the nation faces rapidly increasing technological change and inevitable decline in the world, we don’t need any more vengeful prosecutors leading us anywhere.

JOHN GRANT is a member of ThisCantBeHappening!, the new independent three-time Project Censored Award-winning online alternative newspaper. His work, and that of colleagues DAVE LINDORFF, GARY LINDORFF, ALFREDO LOPEZ, LORI SPENCER, LINN WASHINGTON, JR. and CHARLES M. YOUNG, can be found at www.thiscantbehappening.net

Posted by Richard R. Thompson on 2014-02-02 20:13:05

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