Straightforward Tips About Games

Straightforward Tips About Games

Games vary widely from the gaming industry. Some games are high-quality, but other people are cheap instead of really good. The next articles will give you comprehension of the ideal games to decide on which enables your investment worthwhile.

Purchase games preowned. The fee for new games are $60 or higher according to the title. Spending a ton of money with a game you may possibly not play a good deal can be a waste. By purchasing used, you can find 25-50% off a game title you’re enthusiastic about.

When saving your game, don’t just save it in the same slot. Once in a while, input it in a fresh one. You eventually may wish so as to go back into the game. When you keep saving the overall game in the same spot whenever, you then won’t be capable of try something different.

If you achieve frustrated by using a particular game, move on from using it for somewhat. When you stay ahead of the screen, odds are your anger will receive the best people, so you won’t make any progress. However, going for a short break will assist you to clear your face, and you will return refreshed.

Patience will be your good friend in relation to buying games. Although most big-name games get released with premium costs, their costs will fall rapidly after some time. Waiting several months can score you big savings. As an extra, it is possible to grab better versions (including expansion pack content) when you hold off a little bit while.

Take care about playing video games online. Fees each month are an expense that could sneak through to you with internet games. Anytime your youngsters prefer to join an internet based site, make sure you evaluate it upfront. Discover whether you will need to invest anything and regardless of if the game is definitely worth the charge involved.

While a game’s rating might point to that it must be ideal for a middle school aged child, the quantity of violence included might not exactly sit well along. In such a circumstance, either placed the game away or limit the time period your child plays it. Whilst you can’t shield them from everything, you may control simply how much violence they see.

Sell your old gaming items. Rather than letting your gaming items you will no longer use sit around and collect dust, sell them. You may sell them online or at numerous game stores. In the majority of areas you will discover xbox game stores that buy and then sell on gaming items.

Prior to spend a ton of money on stuff like controllers or memory cards, search the web for the used version. Sometimes a shop will probably be out from used game hardware, that may be very inexpensive. Be sure to have a look at an internet based seller’s feedback prior to the buying therefore you determine you’re getting the things you given money for.

We all know, games can be expensive. You may enhance your child’s selection by organizing a relevant video game co-op with neighbors or friends. Print lists of the games each member has, and formulate a "check-out" system, allowing kids to borrow a relevant video game for the specified length of time. Make good rules and stick with them.

When you are into gaming in your computer, determine what it might handle. Computer games feature system requirements, including CPU speed to graphics card model and power. Be aware that the listed requirements about the box are minimums. Your pc should be better to perform the overall game well.

Don’t be too quick to dismiss a part-playing game when your first exposure to it can be under whelming. A large number of games provide you extensive selections for customizing your character, and you can obtain the game more pleasant by using a differently-built character. You don’t would like to neglect an incredible gaming experience because you’re playing an unacceptable class!

Check online auction marketplace websites to get deals on newer games. If you feel spent too much money buying games, use auction sites to acquire them for cheaper. Be sure to thoroughly search in order to be sure you receive the most beneficial deal possible. The bid till you win.

You will need to realize how to find the best games into the future on top. What is important you have to know as a way to enjoy your gaming experience is which games are shovelware or else bad games. Apply the information with this helpful article and you will probably be soon on your way enjoying your gaming experience on the fullest. archerepisodelist.com/

Posted by percyhopper1 on 2014-04-13 07:03:06

Tagged: , watch , TV , online , list , archer , episodes

Is the Pitato why we can’t have nice things?

Is the Pitato why we can’t have nice things?

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[Note: I originally wrote the bulk of this article as an unpublished memo about 18 months ago. I have updated it to include new information. The views and opinions expressed in this article are mine and do not necessarily reflect the views of my clients.]

The big news this past week was that Coinbase acquired Earn.com (née 21.co, née 21e6 LLC). According to Recode, the offer “was slightly more than $100 million” but also lower than Earn.com’s most recent valuation (in 2015) which was $310 million.

From the current coverage, it is unclear what the revenue for any of the products or services for Earn.com was. Instead most stories have focused on one specific aspect: the current Earn.com CEO, Balaji Srinivasan, will join Coinbase as the CTO.

There have been a lot of questions around why Coinbase would purchase a company that seemed to have poor product-market fit with unknown KPIs. This post will look into several areas for answers.

Taking a step back

Following the official acquisition announcement from Coinbase, Srinivasan published a self-congratulatory Medium post that basically paints him as the savior of 21.co: that it was the previous management that were bad and he came in and turned it all around.1

His revisionism arguably whitewashed what happened, so let’s dive into a little bit of the company’s history.

In May 2013, 21inc (formerly 21e6 LLC) was co-founded by five men including Balaji Srinivasan. According to a story from Nathaniel Popper:

The company was also structured as an limited liability company, rather than the C Corp typical of startups, so that people could invest with their own money.

Why is that important to some investors?

According to Popper:

The 21e6 investment was attractive in part because venture capital firms generally felt that they couldn’t buy Bitcoins directly. 21e6, on the other hand, offered to pay its investors back with Bitcoin dividends, allowing the firm to get Bitcoins without buying them outright.

What does this mean?

Venture funds often have clauses restricting their partners from investing in asset classes that may be seen as a conflict of interest or something that could reduce the firm’s reputation (e.g., cannabis startups). In this case, cryptocurrencies may be seen as a direct speculative bet on a commodity or foreign exchange which could be prohibited by an investment funds by-laws.2

Altogether the 21e6 team, over three separate rounds, raised approximately $116 – 125 million – which at the time was more money than any other cryptocurrency-related company.3 The sum total varied depending on news source but Srinivasan frequently made it a point to casually insert comments such as: we are the “most funded” or “best funded” company in Bitcoin into interviews and talks during 2015-2016.

In the beginning

In its early days 21e6 focused exclusively on designing custom ASIC chips for Bitcoin mining and then integrating and deploying Bitcoin mining hardware for private, non-retail usage. This included installing hundreds of hashing systems in data centers which for several reasons eventually became uncompetitive against those based in China and the Republic of Georgia.45

Based on publicly available information and allegedly leaked slides we know that:6

It closed its Series A for $5 million in May 2013.

Investors included: Peter Thiel, David Sacks, Max Levchin, Marc Andreessen, Ben Horowitz, Naval Ravikant, Winklevoss Capital, Mark Pincus

Estimated $3.8 million revenue in 2013

In June 2013, then-CEO Matthew Pauker filed a Form D, Notice of Exempt Offering of Securities, which stated that 55 investors had already invested in its offering.7 While that may sound unusual for an early stage company to have so many investors, recall what Popper pointed out above, that individual investors could invest directly into 21e6 because of its LLC status.

It closed its Series B for approximately $65 million in December 2013.

Andreessen Horowitz (the VC fund) invested $25 million as the lead investor; and $10 million came from existing investors (such as $100,000 from Pantera)

$30 million also came in the form of “venture debt”

Estimated $41 million in revenue in 2014

19 employees in November 2014

The funds from its first two rounds were used in part to design and deploy “Gandalf” (its 2nd generation ASIC chip) and “Yoda” (its 3rd generation ASIC chip) in the aforementioned data centers.

How much capital is required to build a state-of-the-art ASIC chip? Depending on how much is done in-house or out-sourced as well as the fabrication facilities, it can be upwards of $15 – $20 million.8

First major pivot

The company rebranded from 21e6 to 21.co and announced its Series C on March 10, 2015, with $56 million led by RRE Ventures.

That morning, The Wall Street Journal led with the story:

Secretive Bitcoin Startup 21 Reveals Record Funds, Hints at Mass Consumer Play

This marked the beginning of its pivot from purely building mining hardware and instead marketing itself as supposedly moving into the Internet of Things (IoT) and API marketplace. Around this time you frequently saw 21.co and its supporters publicly talk about machine-to-machine (M2M) payments as being a killer app.9 One of the 21.co engineers was even interviewed on a (now deleted) podcast where he spoke about how drone owners would pay tolls denominated in bitcoin to cut across airspace over yards in your neighborhood. You know, the usual word salad and shower thoughts on social media.

When I first drafted this memo 18 months ago, based on LinkedIn profiles, 21.co had about 25 full-time employees; as of now their page says 22 employees but most of them are just people adding 21.co in their profiles without formally being affiliated with it. Most of the current employees unsurprisingly have shifted to Earn.com’s official LinkedIn profile. Its tally is 63 people but again, some of these profiles are from people who are likely unaffiliated with the organization.

Other known investors through 2016:10

Data Collective

Khosla Ventures

Yuan Capital

Drew Houston

Dara Khosrowshahi

Avant Global

Karl Mehta

Capricorn Management / Jeff Skoll Group

Qualcomm Ventures

World Innovation Labs

Other board members/observers:

Alan Chang (Jeff Skoll’s family office via Capricorn Management) in Series B

Richard Tapalaga (Qualcomm Ventures) in Series C

Gen Isayama (World Innovation Labs) in Series C

According to Nathaniel Popper, as of March 2015 when it announced the closing of its Series C round, “the company has paid back all of its investors.” It did so partially via payouts in bitcoin.

In his self-canonization this week, Srinivasan wrote that:

And with this deal, the total value of cash, cryptocurrency, and equity returned to our shareholders is now in excess of the capital invested in the company.

How much of the cryptocurrency above is from the not-yet-released Earnable Token? Get the whitepaper while you still can.

Since March 2015, there has also been noticeable churn at the top:11

Matthew Pauker, co-founder, was replaced as CEO in spring 2015 by Balaji Srinivasan

Albert Esser was the COO from December 2013 through August 2015

Replaced by John Granata from March 2016 to the present

Nigel Drego co-founder, was chief architect from May 2013 through March 2016

Replaced by Jian Li as CTO from March 2016 through 2017

Lily Liu became CFO during summer 2015 to the present

Because of the economic incentives that tilt in favor of mining countries like China, 21.co stopped its operations in the Bitcoin mining sector and those subject-matter experts seem to have left the ranks.

Second major pivot. Or part of the first?

What has it built since the pivot after Series C?

The 21 Bitcoin Computer was their first consumer-facing product that was announced on September 21, 2015 and released with great fanfare as an exclusive to Amazon Launchpad on November 16, 2015 at a price of $400. It also picked up the “toaster” nickname from the Financial Times.12

Several enthusiasts explored the component prices via a piece-by-piece breakdown and found that it likely cost around $247 to build each 21 Computer.13 It was subsequently nicknamed the “Pitato” because the main component at its heart was basically a Raspberry Pi, a popular DIY kit that sells for less than $200.

The only other notable piece of tech was a custom built ASIC chip that could be used for mining. However, ever before it had shipped, the mining chip was already uncompetitive and obsolete. Even if you had free electricity you likely would not generate enough bitcoin in order to recoup the full cost of buying the 21 Computer, especially since the few satoshi you generated would be stuck as dust.14

What were the maths behind this?

In September 2015, after it was announced, Vitalik Buterin crunched the numbers and worked out that:

So you’re paying $399 upfront and getting $0.105 per day or $38.3 per year, and this is before taking into account network difficulty increases, the upcoming block halving (yay, your profit goes down to $0.03 per day!) and, of course, the near-100% likelihood that you won’t be able to keep that device on absolutely all of the time. I seriously hope they have multiple mining chips inside of their device and forgot to mention it; otherwise you can outcompete this offering pretty easily by just preloading a raspberry pi with $200 of your favorite cryptotokens.

Why the relatively large markup for a device? Part of it is that Amazon Launchpad gets a 25% cut.

But like just about all things Bitcoin, sales numbers were so bad that they were never disclosed and it was eventually discontinued. Prior to its discontinuation, 21.co representatives approached multiple well-known Bitcoin developers to help resell the devices. In short, these developers were offered to buy 21.co devices at wholesale prices and expected to resell them at the retail price. It is unclear how many (if any) developers did so.

For real, the second major pivot

On April 1, 2016, 21.co launched an app “marketplace” and initially seeded it with 50 apps that were built in-house. At the time, the only way to externally measure usage or traction is to manually observe the amount of ratings (stars) an app had each day. Interestingly, in early July 2016 the amount of apps stood at 95 whereas six weeks later it fell to 76 and basically fluctuated for the remainder of the year.

In May 2016, Srinivasan took the stage at Consensus and announced his vision of a “machine payable web” and introduced several ideas but notably did not mention the Bitsplit which was rumored to have been in the works for over a year.15

Throughout the remainder of the year, 21.co sponsored and hosted meetups and had an active Slack room, and most of the ideas that were used or borrowed as API and app ideas, languished due to… a lack of users. If you are new to my site, one reoccurring observation is that in general: cryptocurrency owners typically are not actual users, but that’s a whole different discussion.

The 21.co Marketplace now redirects to the Earn.com homepage.

Pivot three

On October 27, 2017, 21.co emailed its users that it was ending server-side support for three things: the Bitcoin Computer, 21 command line interface (CLI), and marketplace. 16

Three days later, 21.co announced that it was rebranding as Earn.com and pivoting away from its second vision as a VC-backed quasi protocryptojacking play towards taking on Amazon Mechanical Turk, but with Bitcoin. It also announced a non-ICO ICO called Earnable Token, which as you can tell from its name: was earnable from doing the same kind of tasks as you could before like: filling out surveys or answering bots who email you.

Earn.com also migrated the unique profile pages it first introduced with 21.co, which is basically a static page that users can claim and use a bit like LinkedIn, but with more Bitcoin-related spam.17

Source: Twitter

Unregistered securities?

This last part is of particular interest in today’s regulatory climate because Earn.com, which hosts these user-controlled accounts, has accidentally assisted and enabled the promotion of alleged unregistered securities (ICOs) as a business line. Recall that Google, Facebook, Snap, Twitter, Mailchimp, and other tech companies have reduced or removed the ability for ICOs and cryptocurrency promoters to solicit retail investors, Earn.com has done the opposite and been a refuge. At what point is this an unsuitable risk profile for a “bank” like Coinbase?18

What does that mean?

In its January 2018 update, Earn.com announced that:

This week we were thrilled to announced the launch of Earn.com Airdrops — a new way for blockchain entrepreneurs to give 100,000+ Earn.com users a free trial of any new coin or token. Airdrops allows token projects to instantly bootstrap your new blockchain project with 100,000+ cryptocurrency early adopters.

We announced our first Airdrop partner, CanYa — a decentralized marketplace for services — as well as the next three upcoming Airdrops: Bloom, Bee Token, and Vezt. Sign up for an account on Earn.com, verify your account, and download the Earn.com mobile apps on iOS or Android apps to become eligible.

I am not a lawyer but in the past – like the dotcom era – companies (including startups) have attempted to give away equity in some very creative ways… and depending on the circumstances, it can be a no-no.19 That’s not to say that the tokens above are securities or that any airdrop is a violation of securities laws. But highlighting this type of feature has inadvertently led to Earn.com becoming a magnet for ICO issuance and promotion.

Where’s the beef?

What was the long term deliverable for roughly $125 million in nearly 5 years?

Throughout 2016 – including at Consensus in NYC – Srinivasan explained that they will announce a “surprise” in the coming months, maybe all of the aforementioned products and chips were the alpha phase of a much larger operation? Maybe they were, but we probably won’t find out.

Either way, it is worth keeping in mind that between 2013-2016, cryptocurrency-specific startups collectively received a little more than $1 billion in external funding, with nearly 15% of that funneled into just one startup. One who has had to pivot multiple times to find the right product-market fit and tech-market fit. Keep in mind too that other companies such as Bitfury and Bitmain were able to make superior chips and do so initially without major venture backing.20

If the most funded, best connected startup continually struggled to see consumer traction, what are the prospects for less funded and less connected cryptocurrency startups? This is worth revisiting in another long-read, especially in seeing what the $125 million was actually spent on (salaries? chips? toasters?).

How involved was he?

Source: Twitter

One of the investors in 21.co responded to Nathaniel Popper above claiming that Srinivasan wasn’t actively involved in the first two years.

Does it matter? Sure, when you are claiming successes and denying failures that should or shouldn’t be attributed to you.

Below is a quick series of interrelated anecdotes.

In December 2014, Srinivasan and I both attended and presented at what would become the second of three round table events organized by R3 (a family office then called R3 CEV). This was prior to the formal creation of the DLG consortium.21 Unfortunately I do not have his presentation, but the layout and design were nearly identical to the leaked slides that have circulated for years — just with different content. For instance, the design of his slides at a public talk in the spring of 2015 is pretty close to the other two decks.

In January 2015, I was unexpectedly shown a long set of slides for a company called 21e6, most of which look similar to what has been leaked in the past and linked to above.22

Later that same month – due to a variety of circumstances – I met up with Srinivasan in Palo Alto and he quickly paged through the leaked presentation and stated it was an older deck from October / November 2014.

While there is a little more to our subsequent interactions, I think the key part here and the only reason I brought up this personal anecdote is the fact that Srinivasan was able to dismiss the deck of having any relevance on the current fundraising 21e6 was doing (remember, this was less than two months before the round was publicly announced).23

So while he may not have been “day to day” as he disclaims in his post, he clearly was involved in the fundraising process if not more (deck creation?). He said as much in a post published in March 2015.

So what to make of all of this news?

An exit is an exit, right?

What ultimately appears to have happened is that Andreessen Horowitz took one of its floundering portfolio companies and merged it with another portfolio company… and declared it a great success.2425

Source: Twitter

There also appear to be a few parallels with Juicero.26 For those unfamiliar, Juicero is a now-defunct Silicon Valley-based startup that built and sold a custom $400 machine that would squeeze juice packets. It raised $120 million and unceremoniously shut down last year after reporters showed that the hands from mere humans were capable of squeezing the same juice packets.

In much the same way, during the second pivot of 21.co, no one really bothered to buy the “Pitato” because users could easily do the math: that it was far more effective to either buy bitcoins outright or buy and use more capable mining hardware.

Why hasn’t anyone written about this before?

Most of the knowledge above is public, or at least, pretty well known if you have spent much time in Bitcoinland. Other reasons involve some tinfoil hat theories around retaliation.27

Funnily enough, back in March 2015 I had a long email exchange with Michael Casey and Paul Vigna over at The Wall Street Journal regarding 21.co and other several other topics.

This culminated in the quote:

Tim Swanson, a consistently skeptical digital-currency consultant who makes a habit of challenging bitcoiners’ unbridled optimism, is unequivocal. 21′s plan is “a dumb idea,” he says, adding that “the investors deserve to get what’s coming to them.”

And while a few of those investors probably did, it is Coinbase share holders that likely got it on the chin this week.28 If you’re looking for more memorable gems, be sure to read this older WSJ article. It is chocked-full of hubris, kind of like Juicero.29

In closing, raise your hand if you’d like to get paid every time you respond to an email and moreso to a cold email? I know I would.

So maybe with all of the kinks, toasters, pivot denialism, and chest thumping there is still a future for a pay-to-respond model to thrive. Maybe Coinbase can turn the ICO sanctuary of Earn.com into a legitimate mainstream product that is integrated with various webmail providers and social media platforms. Or maybe this ends up like ChangeTip, whose platform was basically used to spam coin dust on Twitter… to ultimately shutting down after an acquihire from Airbnb.

Either way, there was a bit more to this story than what was let on in Srinivasan’s original Medium post on Monday.

Endnotes

Would that be a Bitcoin-powered bus that the management team was thrown under?

Over the past several years, multiple venture funds have had their by-laws amended or re-written to allow them to purchase cryptocurrencies and directly invest into ICOs.

In March 2015, 21inc announced that it had raised a total of $116 million, however according to Nathaniel Popper’s account of their history, they had raised about $125 million. For one reason or another, historically many cryptocurrency companies do not typically reveal their active user numbers or revenue figures. Instead they prefer talking about how much outside funding they have raised. And 21.co was not an exception to this.

There are several reasons why this was the case. With the right guanxi: a combination of electricity, land, and taxes could be cheaper in certain parts of China versus the US. In addition, 21e6 and other US-firms were consistently unable to manufacture mining machines and operate farms at a similar scale as their peers. Part of this was logistics as well: large portions of the supply chain were based overseas (primarily in Guangdong and Taiwan). I have written about this in multiple different posts over the past several years, such as this piece.

One of the interesting things that Srinivasan’s article confirms was a rumor I first heard two years ago from one of their mining competitors: that 21e6 had signed leases with data centers whose energy rates were so abysmal that you might as well just bought coins instead as it would basically be impossible to recoup those costs. Another unconfirmed rumor was around immersion cooling: that between 2014-2015 21e6 had experimented and burnt through a large quantity of chip inventory in a radical attempt to reduce the cooling needs and costs of mining chips.

Some of this information comes from: reddit, CoinDesk, Financial Times, and Jorge Stolfi. Googling around too.

Form D – note that the domains 21e6.com and .net and .org all registered around March/April 2013.

Why Are Computer Chips So Expensive? from Forbes. In addition to non-recoverable engineering, there are also component costs and testing thereof: PCB, SMT, power supply, fans, integration. Testing and trouble-shooting cannot be ignored. For instance, Hashfast was an example of a company who built a relatively fast chip but had problems with managing the power source and consequently went bankrupt.

Srinivasan did talk about micropayments as early as March 2014.

Sources: CrunchBase / AngelList

In May 2015 it was reported that Cisco may invest or may have invested in 21inc. Padma Warrior, former Chief Technology and Strategy Officer at Cisco, was rumored to be a key individual involved in that deal. Note: as of August 2016, a site redesign on 21.co removed investors and corporate information from the homepage.

This is mainly because an earlier 21e6 pitch stated that the company would integrate mining chips in always-on consumer electronics and appliances.

Breakdown of Hardware Costs for New 21 Inc Bitcoin Computer by Sam Patterson

One reviewer commented: “I’d say one more thing worth adding is that it’s worth critiquing not just the feasibility of the Pitato but also the ethics. Because Pitatoes are inherently less efficient than regular mining farms due to economies of scale, the only way that they could be competitive relative to just buying bitcoin is if they were using free electricity; that is, basically all profitable usage of Pitatoes would be people using other people’s electricity in workplaces, universities, Starbucks, hotels, homes if the landlord pays for it, etc. I predict that if it actually became popular, then we’d see all the places that provide free electricity today become much more cautious about it, which could greatly reduce convenience for everyone but bitcoin miners.”

In one of its incarnations, Bitsplit was basically a euphemism for socializing CPU labor and privatizing some of the gains… now commonly called cryptojacking.

Note: in between the second and third pivot, during January 2017, Srinivasan deleted his tweets and interviewed for the top job at the FDA in Washington DC.

One reviewer commented that: “My personal view is that the current Earn.com concept is fundamentally legitimate and probably will see some usage (I can totally imagine consultants charging $50 for replying to emails, as that’s a very low-transaction-cost way to get one-time advice from people), but it deserves to exist as one of the 173 configurable settings in an email provider or social media service, not an independent multi-hundred-million dollar company. Perhaps the Coinbase acquisition actually will be utility-improving, in that gives the Earn.com team an ability to try to be useful by making gadgets for an existing company that has a userbase and services, rather than trying to build their own ecosystem which never made any sense (though it’s still a pretty disappointing end relative to Balaji’s original hype and aspirations).”

Is Coinbase a bank? From the outside they seem to be a bit like a non-licensed deposit taking institution.

The line of reasoning is as follows: some startups attempted to randomly give away shares to strangers via various gimmicks but ultimately had to either take it back and/or were sued. If certain ICOs are deemed securities, you might not be able to just give them away to anonymous people. Reminder: I am not a lawyer, talk to a securities lawyer.

One competitor noted that: “21e6’s decision to go the Intel fabrication route was a non-starter.

Someone should remind me to talk about the dinner conversation that evening as well.

Coincidentally a few days prior to receiving those slides, I spoke with a NYC-based investor who was asking about the pros and cons of embedded ASICs for mining cryptocurrencies. Specifically: should the fund invest in a startup designing embedded ASICs for bitcoin mining. I provided my view point (the answer was no, still is a no). During this same time frame there was a big meme being pushed by many Bitcoin boosters: that mining would somehow become re-decentralized via some unknown magic bullet. Some of these promoters believed that 21.co would be the one to do it, without much evidence that the company could (or that anyone could). Note: there have been multiple other attempts at building and shipping embedded ASIC mining chips including from Midea and Bitfury. None have been successful by any measure.

Remind me to mention the coincidence at Chipotle.

One reviewer asked: “Is this self-dealing?”

Another reviewer said: “This is acquisition theater, everyone is just trying to save face because this wasn’t a great idea, had wasteful execution, and the hype and hoopla reflects poorly on all involved. The players fundamentally misunderstood the tech, the economics and use cases. I get that a VCs job is to make unsubstantiated bets on tech entrepreneurs they like. But here, an outright $116m investment in Bitcoin would have yielded X billions. And the “we returned all capital” probably because of BTC dividends and its price hike than cash returns.”

See Section 4 of a popular post last year.

What are the repercussions for publicly asking critical questions regarding bold claims such as those from a fireside chat with both Srinivasan and Andreessen? Being blocked on ol’ Twitter.

Since we are going into the anecdote highway: in March 2015, at the Stanford Blockchain Workshop event, I approached Adam Ludwin after his panel discussion. On the panel he had mentioned that there could be a “redecentralization” of mining through an upcoming “Silicon Valley moment.” I assume he was talking about 21e6’s plan for mining chips being integrated into always-on devices because he was affiliated with one of its investors. When I told him I had seen a 21e6 deck and that it was making some very wild, likely incorrect assumptions, he basically said: we will see about that. Well, we have seen that once again: the difficulty rating rises with prices thereby diluting existing hash generating devices making them obsolete.

Some of the comments from the 21.co spokesperson are enjoyable. These hashing devices still wouldn’t be profitable at the current prices today because the difficulty rating has increased in proportion to the price yet all of the hashing units inside phone chargers and toasters had a fixed unit of labor. It’s a no-win situation for device owners as they would still have to pay for both the depreciating capital good (the device) as well as the electricity.

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Is the Pitato why we can’t have nice things? syndicated from smartoptionio.wordpress.com/

Posted by ShawnOrcutt on 2018-04-18 20:00:52

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Coquetel do lançamento do voto popular

Coquetel do lançamento do voto popular

Coquetel do lançamento do voto popular

Popular Vote launching cocktail

FILE PRIX LUX é um prêmio internacional que será concedido a profissionais na área das linguagens eletrônico-digitais. Trata-se de um prêmio para a arte do século XXI, uma iniciativa inédita na América Latina. A premiação ocorrerá em 26 de julho de 2010, no teatro do SESI – São Paulo, juntamente com a exposição do FILE 2010.
O FILE PRIX LUX concederá sete prêmios (primeiro lugar, segundo lugar e cinco menções honrosas) para cada uma das três categorias, oferecendo assim 21 prêmios em dinheiro no valor total de 285 mil reais. Além da seleção do júri, haverá votação popular que será feita através do site do FILE PRIX LUX. As categorias são: Arte Interativa, Linguagem Digital e Sonoridade Eletrônica.
Para saber mais sobre o FILE PRIX LUX acesse: www.fileprixlux.org

FILE PRIX LUX is an international prize that will be granted to professionals in the area of electronic-digital languages. It is an award for the art of the 21st century, an unprecedented initiative in Latin America. The award ceremony will happen on July 26, 2010, in the SESI – São Paulo theater, along with the FILE 2010 exhibition.
FILE PRIX LUX will grant seven prizes (first place, second place, and five honorable mentions) to each of three categories, thus offering 21 prizes in money, in the total amount of 285,000 reals. Besides the jury’s selection, there will be a popular vote through the FILE PRIX LUX website. The categories are: Interactive Art, Digital Language, and Electronic Sonority.
More information about FILE PRIX LUX can be found at: www.fileprixlux.org

Indicados ao prêmio | Nominees

ARTE INTERATIVA | INTERACTIVE ART

As an artist, I need to rest – Sonia Cillari – Holanda | Netherlands

Building Music – Play the Magic: Julio Obelleiro, Alberto García, Jorge Cano & Pedro Enriquez – Estados Unidos | United States

Chorus – UVA: United Visual Artists – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

Compass Phone – Hayeon Yoo – Coréia do Sul | South Korea

CPU (Central Processing Unit) – 1n0ut: Robert Praxmarer & Reinhold Bidner – Áustria | Austria

CubeBrowser – Ludwig Zeller – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

CybeRITMO – Tuti Fornari – Brasil | Brazil

Digitie – Marianne Schmidt – Alemanha | Germany

Diorama Table – Keiko Takahashi & Shinji Sasada – Japão | Japan

Dune – Studio Roosegaarde: Daan Roosegaarde – Holanda | Netherlands

Ferrofluid Magnetoscope – Michael Flynn – Estados Unidos | United States

Flaneur Symphony – Keith Lam – China | China

Frame Seductions – Pierre Proske – França | France

Geogoo – Jodi: Joan Heemskerk & Dirk Paesmans – Holanda | Netherlands

Guten Touch – Multitouch Barcelona: Dani Armengol, Roger Pujol, Xavier Vilar & Pol Pla – Espanha | Spain

I wanted to see all of the news from today – Martin John Callanan – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

Light Calligraphy – Luo, He-Lin & Chen, I- Chun – Taiwan (R.O.C.) | Taiwan (R.O.C.)

Living Light – The Living: David Benjamin & Soo-in Yang – Estados Unidos | United States

Luzes relacionais (Relational Lights) – Ernesto Klar – Estados Unidos | United States
Mood Tail – Tseng,Wei-Chieh – Taiwan | Taiwan

Ocean of Light : Surface – Squidsoup: Anthony Rowe, Gareth Bushell, Christopher Bennewith, Liam Birtles & Ollie Bown – Nova Zelândia, Reino Unido e Austrália | New Zeland, United Kingdom and Australia

PISO – Rejane Cantoni & Leonardo – Brasil | Brazil

Public Epidemic Nº1 – Olle Cornéer & Martin Lübcke – Suécia | Sweden

Roy Block – Sebastian Schmieg – Alemanha | Germany

Salt Lake – Yacine Sebti & Tom Heene – Bélgica | Belgium

SARoskop – Martin Hesselmeier & Karin Lingnau – Alemanha – Germany
S-ICI/is it here? – Fred Périé – França | France

Sign after the X – David Clark, Marina Roy & Graham Meisner – Canadá | Canada

Slomo – Creative Advisor Group: John Paul Bichard & Magnus Jonsson – Suécia | Sweden

Sniff – Karolina Sobecka – Estados Unidos | United States

Space Invaders – Multitouch Barcelona: Dani Armengol, Roger Pujol, Xavier Vilar & Pol Pla – Espanha | Spain

Strings – Myrto Karanika & Jeremy Keenan – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

SuperFluidity – Electronic Shadow: Naziha Mestaoui & Yacine Aït Kaci – França | France

The Travels of Mariko Horo – Tamiko Thiel – Alemanha | Germany

The Trend Is Your Friend – Sylvia Eckermann and Gerald Nestler. Sound by Peter Szely – Áustria | Austria

V+ – Jonas Bohatsch – Áustria | Austria

Virtual Ground – Andrew Hieronymi – Estados Unidos | United States

Vitalino – Jarbas Jácome – Brasil | Brazil

SMSlingshot – VR/Urban: Patrick Tobias Fischer, Christian Zöllner, Thilo Hoffmann & Sebastian Piatza – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

Waves – Daan Brinkmann & Hugues Bruyère – Holanda | Netherlands

WAVO – Kazushi Mukaiyama & Masaki Maeda – Kazushi Mukaiyama & Masaki Maeda

SONORIDADE ELETRÔNICA | ELECTRONIC SONORITY

2x (Power of two) – Jorge Luis Crowe – Argentina | Argentina

Archetypal Sound Installation (ASI) – Sung, Heng – Taiwan | Taiwan

Camera Lucida: Sonochemical Observatory – Evelina Domnitch & Dmitry Gelfand – Holanda | Netherlands

Disc. – Muk – Áustria | Austria

Experimental Music-Instruments – Yoshi Akai – Japão | Japan

From Dust Till Dawn – Markus Decker, Dietmar Offenhuber & Ushi Reiter – Áustria | Austria

HEARTCHAMBERORCHESTRA – TERMINALBEACH: Erich Berger & Peter Votava – Finlândia | Finland

ITINERÁRIO DO SAL – MISO ENSEMBLE: Miguel Azguime, Paula Azguime, André Bartetzki & Perseu Mandillo – Portugal | Portugal

Laptork – Laptork: Esteban Insinger & Fabian Kesler –Argentina | Argentina

LEMURtron – LEMUR: League of Electronic Musical Urban Robots & Eric Singer – Estados Unidos | United States

Light Frequency Fingertips – Robert Mathy – Áustria | Austria

METROBANG – Vinil Bass Sequencer – Ricardo Brazileiro – Brasil | Brazil

netBody:“Augmented Body and Virtual Body II” – Suguru Goto – França | France

Omnibusonia Paulista – Vanderlei Lucentini – Brasil | Brazil

POWEr – Artificiel: Alexandre Burton & Julien Roy – França | France

Reflection Eternal – Matthias Kassmannhuber – Áustria | Austria

Reler – Raquel Kogan – Brasil | Brazil

RGB Music RENGA: 999 Views of Skyscrapers from Great Lawn in Central Park, New York City – Kenji Kojima – Estados Unidos | United States

Silent Percussion Project – Jaime E Oliver LR – Peru | Peru

Soundcities – stanza – United Kingdom

The Baghdad Monologue – Alejandro Viñao – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

Tongue Music: The Sound of a Kiss – Hye Yeon Nam – Estados Unidos | United States

Truce: Strategies for Post-Apocalyptic Computation – Robin Meier & Ali Momeni – França | France

Wet Sounds – Spax – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

LINGUAGEM DIGITAL | DIGITAL LANGUAGE

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz for iPhone – Joerg Piringer – Áustria | Austria

ArtFem.TV – Evelin Stermitz – Áustria | Austria

Binary Glove – Pete Hawkes – Estados Unidos | United States

BioBodyGame – Rachel Zuanon & Geraldo Lima – Brasil | Brazil

Breathing – Guto Nóbrega – Brasil | Brazil

CONNECT – Andreas Muxel – Alemanha | Germany

Death Death Death – Death Death Death – Estados Unidos | United States

Dreams in High Fidelity II – Spot – Estados Unidos | United States

GenePool – Eric Parren – Holanda | Netherlands

Hakodate Luminart – Hakodate Luminart Project – Japão | Japan

Hi! A real human interface – Multitouch Barcelona: Dani Armengol, Roger Pujol, Xavier Vilar & Pol Pla – Espanha | Spain

Marvim Gainsbug – Jeraman & Filipe Calegario – Brasil | Brazil

Mediaflow – MARS: Media Arts Research Studies: Monika Fleischmann & Wolfgang Strauss – Alemanha | Germany

Of How We Have To Leave Doubts Expectations And The Unachieved – André Gonçalves – Portugal | Portugal

RESCATE – Gabriela Golder – Argentina | Argentina

RYO 5000 – YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES: Young-hae Chang & Marc Voge – Coréia do Sul | South Korea

SOLAR – Rejane Cantoni & Leonardo Crescenti – Brasil | Brazil

Southern Ocean Study # 1.0 – Corby & Baily, Jonathan Mackenzie – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

Tardigotchi – SWAMP – Douglas Easterly, Matt Kenyon & Tiago Rorke – Nova Zelândia | New Zealand

The First Poetry Space Shuttle Landing on Second Life – Caterina Davinio, Mirko Lalit Egger & Riccardo Preziosi – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

Tuvalu Visualization Project – Hidenori Watanave Laboratory, Tokyo Metropolitan University & NPO Tuvalu Overview – Japão | Japan

War of Internet Addiction – Corndog & Oil Tiger Machinima Team – China | China

Wizard of OS: The Fish Incident – Tom Jantol – Croácia | Croatia

Posted by FILE PRIX LUX on 2010-05-28 19:33:32

Tagged: , FILE , Festival Internacional de Linguagem Eletrônica , Electronic Language International Festival , São Paulo , Rio de Janeiro , Recife , Porto Alegre , prêmio , FILE PRIX LUX , arte e tecnologia , art and technology , prêmio de arte e tecnologia , art and technology prize , prize , opening cocktail , coquetel de abertura , file festival , Paula Perissinotto , Ricardo Barreto

Workshop do grupo Lab-oca

Workshop do grupo Lab-oca

Workshop do grupo Lab-oca

Lab-oca workshop

FILE PRIX LUX é um prêmio internacional que será concedido a profissionais na área das linguagens eletrônico-digitais. Trata-se de um prêmio para a arte do século XXI, uma iniciativa inédita na América Latina. A premiação ocorrerá em 26 de julho de 2010, no teatro do SESI – São Paulo, juntamente com a exposição do FILE 2010.
O FILE PRIX LUX concederá sete prêmios (primeiro lugar, segundo lugar e cinco menções honrosas) para cada uma das três categorias, oferecendo assim 21 prêmios em dinheiro no valor total de 285 mil reais. Além da seleção do júri, haverá votação popular que será feita através do site do FILE PRIX LUX. As categorias são: Arte Interativa, Linguagem Digital e Sonoridade Eletrônica.
Para saber mais sobre o FILE PRIX LUX acesse: www.fileprixlux.org

FILE PRIX LUX is an international prize that will be granted to professionals in the area of electronic-digital languages. It is an award for the art of the 21st century, an unprecedented initiative in Latin America. The award ceremony will happen on July 26, 2010, in the SESI – São Paulo theater, along with the FILE 2010 exhibition.
FILE PRIX LUX will grant seven prizes (first place, second place, and five honorable mentions) to each of three categories, thus offering 21 prizes in money, in the total amount of 285,000 reals. Besides the jury’s selection, there will be a popular vote through the FILE PRIX LUX website. The categories are: Interactive Art, Digital Language, and Electronic Sonority.
More information about FILE PRIX LUX can be found at: www.fileprixlux.org

FILE PRIX LUX is an international prize that will be granted to professionals in the area of electronic-digital languages. It is an award for the art of the 21st century, an unprecedented initiative in Latin America. The award ceremony will happen on July 26, 2010, in the SESI – São Paulo theater, along with the FILE 2010 exhibition.
FILE PRIX LUX will grant seven prizes (first place, second place, and five honorable mentions) to each of three categories, thus offering 21 prizes in money, in the total amount of 285,000 reals. Besides the jury’s selection, there will be a popular vote through the FILE PRIX LUX website. The categories are: Interactive Art, Digital Language, and Electronic Sonority.
More information about FILE PRIX LUX can be found at: www.fileprixlux.org

Indicados ao prêmio | Nominees

ARTE INTERATIVA | INTERACTIVE ART

As an artist, I need to rest – Sonia Cillari – Holanda | Netherlands

Building Music – Play the Magic: Julio Obelleiro, Alberto García, Jorge Cano & Pedro Enriquez – Estados Unidos | United States

Chorus – UVA: United Visual Artists – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

Compass Phone – Hayeon Yoo – Coréia do Sul | South Korea

CPU (Central Processing Unit) – 1n0ut: Robert Praxmarer & Reinhold Bidner – Áustria | Austria

CubeBrowser – Ludwig Zeller – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

CybeRITMO – Tuti Fornari – Brasil | Brazil

Digitie – Marianne Schmidt – Alemanha | Germany

Diorama Table – Keiko Takahashi & Shinji Sasada – Japão | Japan

Dune – Studio Roosegaarde: Daan Roosegaarde – Holanda | Netherlands

Ferrofluid Magnetoscope – Michael Flynn – Estados Unidos | United States

Flaneur Symphony – Keith Lam – China | China

Frame Seductions – Pierre Proske – França | France

Geogoo – Jodi: Joan Heemskerk & Dirk Paesmans – Holanda | Netherlands

Guten Touch – Multitouch Barcelona: Dani Armengol, Roger Pujol, Xavier Vilar & Pol Pla – Espanha | Spain

I wanted to see all of the news from today – Martin John Callanan – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

Light Calligraphy – Luo, He-Lin & Chen, I- Chun – Taiwan (R.O.C.) | Taiwan (R.O.C.)

Living Light – The Living: David Benjamin & Soo-in Yang – Estados Unidos | United States

Luzes relacionais (Relational Lights) – Ernesto Klar – Estados Unidos | United States
Mood Tail – Tseng,Wei-Chieh – Taiwan | Taiwan

Ocean of Light : Surface – Squidsoup: Anthony Rowe, Gareth Bushell, Christopher Bennewith, Liam Birtles & Ollie Bown – Nova Zelândia, Reino Unido e Austrália | New Zeland, United Kingdom and Australia

PISO – Rejane Cantoni & Leonardo – Brasil | Brazil

Public Epidemic Nº1 – Olle Cornéer & Martin Lübcke – Suécia | Sweden

Roy Block – Sebastian Schmieg – Alemanha | Germany

Salt Lake – Yacine Sebti & Tom Heene – Bélgica | Belgium

SARoskop – Martin Hesselmeier & Karin Lingnau – Alemanha – Germany
S-ICI/is it here? – Fred Périé – França | France

Sign after the X – David Clark, Marina Roy & Graham Meisner – Canadá | Canada

Slomo – Creative Advisor Group: John Paul Bichard & Magnus Jonsson – Suécia | Sweden

Sniff – Karolina Sobecka – Estados Unidos | United States

Space Invaders – Multitouch Barcelona: Dani Armengol, Roger Pujol, Xavier Vilar & Pol Pla – Espanha | Spain

Strings – Myrto Karanika & Jeremy Keenan – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

SuperFluidity – Electronic Shadow: Naziha Mestaoui & Yacine Aït Kaci – França | France

The Travels of Mariko Horo – Tamiko Thiel – Alemanha | Germany

The Trend Is Your Friend – Sylvia Eckermann and Gerald Nestler. Sound by Peter Szely – Áustria | Austria

V+ – Jonas Bohatsch – Áustria | Austria

Virtual Ground – Andrew Hieronymi – Estados Unidos | United States

Vitalino – Jarbas Jácome – Brasil | Brazil

SMSlingshot – VR/Urban: Patrick Tobias Fischer, Christian Zöllner, Thilo Hoffmann & Sebastian Piatza – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

Waves – Daan Brinkmann & Hugues Bruyère – Holanda | Netherlands

WAVO – Kazushi Mukaiyama & Masaki Maeda – Kazushi Mukaiyama & Masaki Maeda

SONORIDADE ELETRÔNICA | ELECTRONIC SONORITY

2x (Power of two) – Jorge Luis Crowe – Argentina | Argentina

Archetypal Sound Installation (ASI) – Sung, Heng – Taiwan | Taiwan

Camera Lucida: Sonochemical Observatory – Evelina Domnitch & Dmitry Gelfand – Holanda | Netherlands

Disc. – Muk – Áustria | Austria

Experimental Music-Instruments – Yoshi Akai – Japão | Japan

From Dust Till Dawn – Markus Decker, Dietmar Offenhuber & Ushi Reiter – Áustria | Austria

HEARTCHAMBERORCHESTRA – TERMINALBEACH: Erich Berger & Peter Votava – Finlândia | Finland

ITINERÁRIO DO SAL – MISO ENSEMBLE: Miguel Azguime, Paula Azguime, André Bartetzki & Perseu Mandillo – Portugal | Portugal

Laptork – Laptork: Esteban Insinger & Fabian Kesler –Argentina | Argentina

LEMURtron – LEMUR: League of Electronic Musical Urban Robots & Eric Singer – Estados Unidos | United States

Light Frequency Fingertips – Robert Mathy – Áustria | Austria

METROBANG – Vinil Bass Sequencer – Ricardo Brazileiro – Brasil | Brazil

netBody:“Augmented Body and Virtual Body II” – Suguru Goto – França | France

Omnibusonia Paulista – Vanderlei Lucentini – Brasil | Brazil

POWEr – Artificiel: Alexandre Burton & Julien Roy – França | France

Reflection Eternal – Matthias Kassmannhuber – Áustria | Austria

Reler – Raquel Kogan – Brasil | Brazil

RGB Music RENGA: 999 Views of Skyscrapers from Great Lawn in Central Park, New York City – Kenji Kojima – Estados Unidos | United States

Silent Percussion Project – Jaime E Oliver LR – Peru | Peru

Soundcities – stanza – United Kingdom

The Baghdad Monologue – Alejandro Viñao – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

Tongue Music: The Sound of a Kiss – Hye Yeon Nam – Estados Unidos | United States

Truce: Strategies for Post-Apocalyptic Computation – Robin Meier & Ali Momeni – França | France

Wet Sounds – Spax – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

LINGUAGEM DIGITAL | DIGITAL LANGUAGE

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz for iPhone – Joerg Piringer – Áustria | Austria

ArtFem.TV – Evelin Stermitz – Áustria | Austria

Binary Glove – Pete Hawkes – Estados Unidos | United States

BioBodyGame – Rachel Zuanon & Geraldo Lima – Brasil | Brazil

Breathing – Guto Nóbrega – Brasil | Brazil

CONNECT – Andreas Muxel – Alemanha | Germany

Death Death Death – Death Death Death – Estados Unidos | United States

Dreams in High Fidelity II – Spot – Estados Unidos | United States

GenePool – Eric Parren – Holanda | Netherlands

Hakodate Luminart – Hakodate Luminart Project – Japão | Japan

Hi! A real human interface – Multitouch Barcelona: Dani Armengol, Roger Pujol, Xavier Vilar & Pol Pla – Espanha | Spain

Marvim Gainsbug – Jeraman & Filipe Calegario – Brasil | Brazil

Mediaflow – MARS: Media Arts Research Studies: Monika Fleischmann & Wolfgang Strauss – Alemanha | Germany

Of How We Have To Leave Doubts Expectations And The Unachieved – André Gonçalves – Portugal | Portugal

RESCATE – Gabriela Golder – Argentina | Argentina

RYO 5000 – YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES: Young-hae Chang & Marc Voge – Coréia do Sul | South Korea

SOLAR – Rejane Cantoni & Leonardo Crescenti – Brasil | Brazil

Southern Ocean Study # 1.0 – Corby & Baily, Jonathan Mackenzie – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

Tardigotchi – SWAMP – Douglas Easterly, Matt Kenyon & Tiago Rorke – Nova Zelândia | New Zealand

The First Poetry Space Shuttle Landing on Second Life – Caterina Davinio, Mirko Lalit Egger & Riccardo Preziosi – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

Tuvalu Visualization Project – Hidenori Watanave Laboratory, Tokyo Metropolitan University & NPO Tuvalu Overview – Japão | Japan

War of Internet Addiction – Corndog & Oil Tiger Machinima Team – China | China

Wizard of OS: The Fish Incident – Tom Jantol – Croácia | Croatia

Posted by FILE PRIX LUX on 2010-05-28 18:55:22

Tagged: , FILE , Festival Internacional de Linguagem Eletrônica , Electronic Language International Festival , São Paulo , Rio de Janeiro , Recife , Porto Alegre , prêmio , FILE PRIX LUX , arte e tecnologia , art and technology , prêmio de arte e tecnologia , art and technology prize , prize , opening cocktail , coquetel de abertura , file festival , Paula Perissinotto , Ricardo Barreto

MSHA training (14 April 2018, Columbus, Ohio, USA)

MSHA training (14 April 2018, Columbus, Ohio, USA)

In order to gain access to most quarries to examine rocks, minerals, and fossils, geologists and collectors need to have "MSHA certification". This refers to the Mine Safety and Health Administration, which is part of the American federal government. Certification for collectors involves a half-day safety training session. The certification lasts one year, after which a new training session must be taken.

I’ve been to 3 MSHA training sessions. This is the instructor of the training session, Scott Kell of the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Oil and Gas (oilandgas.ohiodnr.gov).

I have 12.5 pages of typed-up notes from these sessions.
————————————
Collecting Safety
Hazard Training
2018
How dangerous are mines and quarries? Be aware and they’re fine, safety-wise.
Common injuries – minor cuts, bruises, sprained ankles. These are things that will happen during a home improvement project.

Misery index – injury inventory
While collecting at a mine or quarry, have you had:
– mashed thumb
– cut requiring a band air
– abrasion requiring first aid
– bruise from a slip or fall
– sprained ankle
– laceration requiring stitches
– heat exhaustion
– heat stroke
– broken bone
– dislocation
– removal by ambulance
– known a fellow-collector who died while collecting in a quarry/mine

Risk of serious injury is relatively minor.

This is not training for subsurface mines.

Emphasizing mines and quarries – not roadcuts or stream cuts, etc.
Safety training is a once-a-year thing, but it’s a mindset – a value.
We all make mistakes, but never intentionally break a host’s rule (e.g., stay 40 feet away from a highwall).
Our hosts – who are they? It’s usually quarries in Ohio, Indiana, Michigan. If granted permission to collect, host are usually owners of mines/quarries. 77 out of 88 Ohio counties have mines and quarries.
Ohio quarries/mines hire ~3500 people and it’s a 1 billion dollars a year industry.
Limestone or dolostone mines – produce materials that make roads, patios, houses, shoreline erosion control, industrial fluxes, filler products, water purification materials, medicine, cosmetics, etc. This kind of industry improves our standard of living – they command our respect, whether we get permission to collect or not. An under-recognized industry.
Coal miners have always been required to go through extensive training.
Industrial quarries have been exempt from training, until 2000.
Miner training includes driving large trucks, storing acetylene tanks – things that don’t apply to mineral collectors or geologists.
Does training make a difference? Yes it does. Does it make all the difference needed? No.
Quarry foremen get lots of calls from collectors. They’re tempted to not offer collecting at all. They prefer only those groups proven to collect safely. Some rock & mineral clubs have poor reputations.
Training helps keep doors open – maybe reopen now-closed doors.
Miner fatalities require investigations, identification of causes, etc. Nearly all fatalities and serious injuries were avoidable if they honored what was learned during training. Most injuries & deaths are new people or so-experienced people that they get blasé.
Only get one chance to make a first impression.
Need to have groups of people that do things right.
Be punctual. Be 15 to 30 minutes early before scheduled sign-in time. Keep in mind construction delays. Be punctual regardless. Have all needed protective equipment.
Be punctual, prepared, attentive, respectful, appreciative, serious. Act like this is a job interview. Try to impress the hosts.
Hosts are usually giving up a weekend day – unpaid. They don’t know you – they haven’t trained you, etc. They’re trusting that you are worthy of their good faith – that you will be responsible. Present yourselves well.
As long as we provide tangible benefits to the company, in terms of public outreach, we will be valued and provided access occasionally.
Recognize personal limitations – make an honest, annual self assessment. Limitation components: cardiorespiratory, morphologic, strength, balance. Time changes us – age matters. Not everyone belongs on a blast pile. No everyone can use specific tools.
Falling in a mine is a common experience.
75+ year old people in society have a greatly increased fall rate.
Example: at a quarry in Genoa, walking from atop a large boulder down to a lower boulder – ended up falling. The cause – stepped on a shoelace – boots had gotten untied.
Everyone will stumble.
Miners and collectors are not exposed to the exact same risks.
Ex: employee in a bucket, extracting loose rocks from a highwall; a rock fell on him – got killed.
Historically, mining has had the highest serious injury rate in any major industry group – things that would cause lost time for a particular miner.
Most sites have prominent signs with number of hours since the last lost-time injury.
With required federal training, fatalities have dropped.
Fatality trends have been declining noticeably since the mid-2000s.
684 surface mine & underground miners have been killed. 627 were surface mine fatalities.
44 miners died annually, on average, before training started.
17.5 died annually more recently, since training started.
Big equipment (“powered haulage”) is the # 1 way miners die. We don’t operate in those. Shouldn’t collect anywhere near them, or where they’re operating. High wall incidents are the # 2 way miners die. Slips/falls are the # 3 way to die for miners.
Miners do things collectors don’t do.
Fatality causes – powered haulage is # 1 cause; highwalls are # 2 cause; third is slips and falls.
While collecting, one usually isn’t around operating equipment. It’s not safe to be working around operating big equipment.
Operators have to provide on-site, site-specific hazard training for people going in – including those excluded from the definition of “miner”. We are “visitors”.
Genoa quarry – usually have a 10-15 minute overview of safety training on site.
Don’t do phone calls during this sort of thing. Never do that.
On-site training is more detailed – it includes site-specific info. – information relating to the unique conditions at any particular mine/quarry.
Training objectives – identify & discuss hazards associated with collecting & hazards associated with just being in the quarry. Learn the terminology of the mine.
Ex: “Don’t collect in the trough.” What’s a trough? Know what the restrictions mean.
Want to earn the trust & respect of the host.
Some rock & mineral clubs are not trained and don’t follow rules.
“Close calls”. We’ve all seen them. Think through any you saw or experienced.
Close call analysis is now an important part of mine safety training.
They want to hear about miners talk about close calls – focusing on prevention by doing close call training.
Unique risks as collectors, versus miners? Yes.
Miners don’t drive personal vehicles into quarries – don’t park in quarries. They are arely on foot where equipment is operating. They usually don’t walk around on blast piles. They typically don’t pick up rocks or use hand tools (chisels, pry bars, saws, etc.). There’s a different set of risks that we expose ourselves to, as collectors.
—————————
Training Topical Overview
Before you enter – prepare personal protective equipment (“PPE”). Know driving safety.
Ground control – be safe around highwalls and benches; be safe while maneuvering on a blast pile. Some quarries don’t allow walking on blast piles.
Other topics – water hazards, tool safety, . . .
Before you enter – always have express permission to enter, from the superintendent or foreman or designated representative. Other employees (like the security guard or the scale house person) can’t allow permission. The former folks know the condition of the mine as of the end of the last shift. That responsibility isn’t part of any other employee’s job. The foremen and superintendents have to know that. They have to be aware of the latest condition of the mine. It is not the law that the foreman/superintendent accompany us the entire time, although they may do that anyway.
Know what time we need to leave & whether it’s as a group or individually. You may have to wait in your vehicle until the time when the entire group leaves together.
Sign in at the office. Sign all paperwork. Don’t want to do paperwork? Then spend your Saturdays doing something else.
Ask questions if clarification is needed. Sometimes, instructions are ambiguous. Some speak in generalities. Some are very specific.
Sometimes on-site training is two parts. One at the office area. One on the quarry floor.
They often speak in generalities. “Don’t go near highwalls.” “Don’t go near haul roads.” Well, how close is “near”? Ask for specifics. Can be admonished for even being 30 feet away. Don’t argue – it’s their mine. Do what they ask.
Listen attentively to site-specific training.
Know what specific areas are permitted & which areas are prohibited.
Note recommended driving pattern – drive in right lane or left lane?
Note about proximity rules for conveyors and other equipment.
Restrictions on specific tools, like cutoff saws or drills? They expect us to go in with the basics – hammers and chisels. Ask about other types of tools.
Will there be blast during the day?
When do they want collectors out of the mine? Sometimes, they want everyone to enter together AND leave together. If need be, when done, sit in car and wait.
Some quarries allow walking atop blast piles – some don’t. Marblehead Quarry wants one foot always on quarry floor. Why’s that? It’s not necessarily unsafe. But it’s what the host is comfortable with. Honor that.
There’s a difference between compliance and true safety. But we have agreed to be compliant in order to enter.
If you arrive late – site-specific training is done, foreman has led everyone into the quarry. You just drive in & join them? No. Have to have site-specific hazard awareness training first. Don’t be late.
Clubs that enter quarries need an emergency plan – have phone number of operator.
Have first-aid kits. Keep an eye on fellow collectors that have medical conditions.
Peronal protective equipment (PPE) for: head, eyes, feet, shins, knees, hands, hearing, respiratory, back.
Some quarry hosts require certain types of protective equipment.
Abide by any conditions.
Quarries have to provide these to miners. Collectors are expected to provide their own.
Well-prepared collectors: durable, full-length pants (no shorts – one’s legs can get shrededd/cut), safety glasses, hardhat, steel-toed boots, reflective vests (commonly required nowadays; in Canada, they need an “X” on the back), belted equipment, shin guards, knee guards, gloves (advisable at some sites), weather-appropriate clothes.
Hardhats are not legally required where collectors are generally allowed. If there is no real risk of something falling on your head – not legally required. However, standard practice is to always have the hardhat on – could be walking in & out of areas where a real risk of falling objects is present.
Suitable hardhats – certified by ANSI Z89.1, with the bill-forward, or with bills all around. This info. is on a sticker within hardhat. A rare restriction is having nearly-new hardhats (less than 5 years old, for example – a Kentucky quarry demanded that). Hosts are free to require any standard above & beyond federal standards.
MSHA and OSHA do not set expiration standards for hardhats.
Hardhats should be replaced if dented or cracked – if the plastic is chalky or soft – if the suspension doesn’t work – that’s a common sign – it loosens and hardhat keeps falling off.
Eye protection – have eyeglasses with sideshields or goggles. Every once in a while, a collector while strike some sample that explodes.
Geodes sometimes explode. Story about how quartz crystals got embedded in a collector’s chest after one exploded on him. About 3 years later, a doctor found quartz crystals still in him on an X-ray. What if that had been the eyes? Probably would have lost your eyesight.
Start cracking geodes with mild taps. Whack harder from there.
Never crack a geode without eye protection.
Steel-toed boots, preferrably with ankle support. Or kevlar-toed boots.
Metatarsal protection – shield that cover the dorsal mid-foot – in case a boulder rolls over your foot – your toes are protected, but your metatarsals will suffer otherwise.
Heavy-duty gloves aren’t always mandatory. They’re recommended with sharp, siliceous rocks or any other site, really. Not really a concern with Ohio sites. Butcher gloves are cut-resistant.
Recommend belting your supplies.
Knee/shin guards recommended.
If you have lots of accessories, have a carrier on a belt. Fluorescent tape, quick-setting glue, handkerchief for cleaning glasses. Don’t want your hands tied up. Get belted carriers at Home Depot-type stores.
Driving in quarries – follow the signs. Assume you will be entering & exiting via a steep ramp – your vehicle needs to be able to handle that (no bad clutch vehicles). Conditions change from year to year. Unique road signage and driving conditions at each quarry – similar to what’s on the open road, but also some unusual signs. Don’t assume the same quarry is the same from year to year.
Example miner fatality – a truck drove into the back of a parked, 300 ton truck, at an estimated 50 mph. It’s never reasonable to be driving at 25 mph, let alone 50 mph.
Travel on grades – use gearing and brakes to control speed. Gear down prior to grade.
On quarry floor – most are nearly horizontal & nearly flat. Law requires tires chocked and turned. Use a rock from site. This is not a safety issue on flat quarry floors – a car in neutral on a flat quarry floor will not move. Federal inspectors interpret the law such that turned & chocked tires are necessary even on flat floors. It’s easy to forget this. Not a true safety standard. Most places are satisfied with chocking one wheel. Put a rock in front of & behind your tires – that should be fine.
There’s a big difference between compliance and genuine safety. There is absolutely nothing unsafe about not chocking tires on flat floors. Remember this if you move from one parking site in the quarry to another one. Chock again. Not truly a safety risk. Definitely do this on a ramp or incline, however.
Only use haul roads authorized by foreman. Know traffic patterns. Yield to moving equipment.
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Think of ways to give back to your hosts.
LaFarge has a public outreach day. Some have donated fossils to this company for their public outreach activities.
Lafarge has a large mine – the Marblehead Quarry – a substantial operation.
The Ohio governor once visited the Lafarge quarry at Marblehead (largest quarry in Ohio) and witnessed a blast – the quarry people appreciated that.
Offer them a “Minerals of Ohio” book or something.
Superintendents & other staff volunteer their time on weekends when they meet & lead groups into quarries for collecting.
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Ground Control – highwall and bench safety.
Ground control is a political term for the condition of the mine, the highwall, the floor, all parts of the mining environment.
Assess hazards from below and above.
Terminology – highwall, trough, blast pile, bench, floor
Highwall is the face created by blasting. Will have one or more highwalls.
Some quarries have a series of benches.
Blast piles may slope from wall to floor. Some have a crest, with a trough (low area) closer to the wall.
“Surface industrial mineral mine”.
Never trust a highwall. Never turn your back to a highwall.
1995-2016 – highwall failures were the # 2 cause of all miner deaths.
Highwall can collapse or can have rocks falling.
Geologists like to collect in-situ samples from specific horizons.
We are not company geologists – we are not authorized to collect samples from highwalls. They can authorize their own geologists – we visitors cannot do that, unless specifically allowed (unlikely, though).
Example: a company geologist fatality – a small rock (a pound or two) fell from upper highwall. Hardhat didn’t save his life.
Catastrophic failures of highwalls can cause deaths.
This is not common. If you’re there when it happens, it won’t bode well..
Risk factors – rock composition, discontinuities within the rock, highwall geometry, weather (highwalls can be riskier than normal under certain weather conditions).
Rock is solid. But rock in highwalls may have discontinuities along which failure can occur. Highwalls can collapse without a sound – no warning.
Highwalls are composed of rock that is anything but solid.
Rock has discontinuities – it is rarely solid.
Bedding planes – a common type of discontinuity here in Ohio. Bedding planes are depositional surfaces are where environments changed over the course of time. In Ohio, they’re usually horizontal.
Can also have joints or fracture planes – usually perpendicular patterns – formed from ancient tectonic events with stresses. Get uniform, consistently-directed fractures in the rock. They’re not there due to quarrying – have been there for a long time. They form trends and often occur at regular angles.
Faults – not many in Ohio quarries. But they are possible.
A few quarries in northwestern Ohio have faults. Some in Michigan. Elsewhere, be aware of faults.
Fractures – basic, generic term for discontinuities (breaks in rock) formed by blasting, pressure release, subsequent weathering from freeze-thaw cycles. Over time, highwalls becoming increasingly fractured and increasingly dangerous.
Constantly reassess the situation while you’re in a quarry or mine.
What conditions (geologic or otherwise) create hazardous highwall conditions?
Highly fractured rocks.
Wall-parallel joints.
Thin-bedded limestone versus massive-bedded dolostone (like Lockport Dolomite). Massive-bedded walls are less dangerous than walls of thin-bedded rocks. The latter are like a stack of bricks.
Overhangs – created where a more stable caprock is underlain by weak, soft, more fissile material, like shale – it weathers away more easily. Caprocks are a serious safety risk.
Once, a fossil collector in a quarry that had Silica Shale went under an overhang – purposefully – for the shade. After moving on, it collapsed 15 to 20 feet. He would have been a grease smear if still hanging out there. Can never tell when something will collapse. The presence of drops – material at the base of a highwall indicates wall is not stable. What makes you think it won’t drop when you’re there? Thawing highwalls will make spitting sounds – warning sign that the highwall is not stable.
Fracturing is often a function of the bedding nature (Ex: thin-bedded limestone versus massive dolostone).
South Rockwood – high-angle joints and faults are present in quarry face.
Most Midwestern quarries have horizontal bedding.
Some do have dipping beds – reef flank deposits. Ex: Swayze, Indiana – also had Pleistocene mammal bones in a karst void. Can’t do collecting there anymore.
Elsewhere, can have steeply angled bedding or foliation.
Look for unstable dipping beds.
Experienced collectors often take greater risks – they’ve gotten away with more and think they’ll be OK. Avoid overhangs.
Some sites – with limestones, in particular, but also dolomite – can partly dissolve away from slightly acidic rainwater and groundwater. Can get clay-filled joints in limestone or dolostone that were enlarged by dissolution (rainfall is slightly acidic – carbonic acid) and filled with material. Rocks in front of such features aren’t really attached to highwall behind – the highwall is a façade at such areas – not stable features. Solution-expanded joints in limestone & dolostone rocks. Over time, joints expand and pieces detach/collapse because they’re no longer supported by the matrix.
Quarries may place barricades of rock next to high-risk sections of highwalls.
Destabilizing fractures often occur at intersections of highwalls of different orientations – “corners” – two highwalls intersect. Compression release coming from both faces result in highly fractured corners.
Some collectors have been observed adjacent to unstable corners – that’s very unsafe and defiant of quarry rules. Respectfully remind people that they may be in unsafe areas. Or are parked in an unsafe area. Don’t need to yell or humiliate, however. Unless it’s over pure defiance.
Most joints are vertical. Some joints & many faults are steeply angled.
Wall-parallel joint surfaces are relatively smooth and iron oxide-stained (brownish-colored).
Back-break – refers to fractures that extend downward from the bench behind the face of the highwall. Often can’t discern how poorly attached segments of highwall are to more stable rock behind them. Easily recognized from above – from a bench. Not so easily observed from the quarry floor. Don’t ever trust a highwall. Don’t necessarily know where back-break fractures are. Usually don’t get a chance to view highwalls from all vantage points.
Example miner death – from highwall collapse along a back-break – a wall-parallel fracture.
Highwalls can be bedrock with unconsolidated glacial deposits above. Ex: boulder-rich glacial till atop limestone. Don’t just look at rockface. Look at what overlies it. Boulders frequently erode down. Evaluate unstable overburden.
Highwall geometry – height and slope of highwall; presence or absence of benches. Rocks falling along a vertical face will drop vertically. Steep, non-vertical walls will have rocks bouncing or rolling downslope. Falling if the wall is vertical. Bouncing if the highwall slope is 60 degrees. Rolling if the highwall slope is 45 degrees.
Benching is used to prevent highwall failures & to capture detaching/collapsing material. Rather than have one big 300’ tall highwall, have a series of benches – rocks get caught on bench surfaces. As benches age, they can get cluttered & covered with material over time. Newer falling material may bounce down along lower walls. Loaded benches – falling rocks will bounce and fly downward. Loaded benches no longer provide an impediment to falling material.
Don’t collect piles below large loaded benches. Don’t collect piles close to highwalls.
Observe loaded benches for frequency of falls/slides. Don’t risk.
Unstable “shot-rock” occurs on loaded benches.
Loaded benches result in “ski jumps”.
Material can cascade over a series of narrow benches.
Things do come flying laterally after falling down slopes. Miner deaths have occurred in trucks from rocks flying sideways, far away from highwalls.
You may want to be 150 feet away from a highwall. The default standard is be 40 feet away from a highwall.
Mines are starting to use computer models to simulate how materials might wall along benches they’re considering building.
Don’t need a computer. Intuitively, can reasonably assess risks & nature of falling rocks.
Highwall vugs are wonderful places to collect crystals. Quarry owners generally don’t allow that. Don’t enter a vug without explicit permission. It’s rare to get that nowadays. Collecting these was done in the days before MSHA rules.
Weather – spring and winter are the most dangerous seasons, in terms of highwall stability. Those are the wet seasons. Dark rocks – are wet – notice dark, water-saturated highwall faces. Water has weight. Water helps to destabilize rocks – it adds weight to highwalls, which further destabilizes the area.
Also consider expanding clays.
Also consider the freeze to thaw period.
Recognize unstable highwall hazards – highly fractured strata, overhangs, back break, high angle joints & faults, cross-bedded or dipping start, solution-enhanced joints, vugs filled with loose debris, unconsolidated material on the bench, highwall geometry, weather factors, etc.
Silica Shale – has specific horizons with extra-good fossil – unit 9.
A Silica Shale quarry visit long ago – a small bench with unit 9 was present – a five foot tall bench – not really a highwall. Chiseled in – rock was fractured. Rock was wet & weather was cold. Pried back several feet into five foot bench. Collected fossils. One geologist moved on eventually. At the end of day, another geologist reported that three foot worth of rock had toppled over – several tons collapsed. Chiseling had undermined the toe of the highwall under cold and wet conditions.
Don’t allow rulebreakers to keep breaking rules.
Quarry hosts may prevent collecting in the trough. At Paulding, a trough is present (“power trough”) between highwall and crest of blast pile.
Barricades – quarry owner may make an arc of stone along part of highwall. Don’t enter the area. May have “Keep Out” signs as well – not all barricades are accompanied by signs. Some barricades are hummocky piles of material. If you see an anomalous pile of rocks – think through – what’s it for? Barricades don’t have to be large, but they can be.
Barricades are made to keep miners out. They certainly don’t want collectors in there.
Allowed to collect the outside of a barricade.
South Rockwood – berms are used, instead of barricades. Berms are linear rock piles perpendicular to the highwall – they don’t connect with the highwall. May be allowed to collect from berms, but don’t be on the inside of the berm. That issue wasn’t brought up during site-specific collecting. Piles of rock that parallel the highwall? Ask about them. Not a barricade – a long, linear berm. Barricades are arcs that connect to the highwall.
If there’s a row of rocks parallel to the highwall, ask about it.
Highwall issues are the most important part of this safety training.
Collectors, while looking downward, can walk into trouble. Constantly look around and assess your position and situation.
Ground control – bench safety. Hazards from above – don’t want to go over the edge Look for unstable fractures in the bench itself. Slips, trips, falls – trip hazards are present on benches as they prepare for the next blast. Unstable ground. . . .
Stay 8 feet from stable edge of bench. Are back-breaks present? 8 feet begins behind them. Miners closer than that have to wear safety belts with lines.
We are not miners – we are not allowed closer than 8 feet to the bench edge
Example miner death – an experienced drill operator was walking along a bench edge on 13 August 2002 in foggy conditions and fell to his death – fell only 23 feet.
Don’t stand on rocks below the edge to collect. People who do are called “organ donors”.
Ground control – spoils piles. These are commercially non-viable material piled up. Can have wonderful fossils. Be cognizant of slope. Watch collectors below you. Don’t work directly upslope or downslope from others.
Shale spoil piles can be rich in fossils – sometimes collecting them is allowed, sometimes not. Spoil piles can be safe to collect. Footing is better when moist. Trickier when dry.
Crushed stone piles – not specimen-rich. Never climb them. They have steep, unstable slopes. Never been invited to collect these.
Blast piles. Some quarries allow you on them – some don’t.
After blasting, material is put onto trucks and shipped away. Toes of blast piles get removed first. Avoid removed toes of blast piles.
Collect in areas where toe is still intact – enter blast piles (if allowed on them) from the toe (enter at an area with a low angle of repose). Avoid truncated toe areas.
When atop a blast pile, keep knees bent. Remember to engage in three point contact (two feet and one hand) – don’t burden your arms and hands with stuff – need to be free. Have to have at least one hand free. Test the stability of next rock before transferring your weight. Move slowly. Don’t always be crouched, but always have one hand free for the 3rd contact. Can use prybars as a cane or walking stick. Getting back down is trickier than climbing up.
For carrying large/heavy specimens across wet/slick blast piles – use a log carrier. If you are carrying a large, heavy specimen in front of you, you’re walking blind – can’t see your next step – easy to slip and fall. If you do fall, abandon the specimen.
It allows a clear line of sight, lowers your center of gravity, and allows one to lower the sample without damage if you begin to lose balance. Does put torque on your back, however. Maybe use a back brace. Some collectors use a log carrier to carry larger rock specimens.
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Story about the eight foot rule from the edge of a bench.
In the 1990s, a collector entered an Indiana quarry, alone, without telling anyone. Was prying pieces of rock away from a bench, facing toward a highwall. A piece popped up – lost balance – went face first over a ~30 feet tall highwall, down to the floor below. Passed out. Woke up later. Collected gear. Crawled out of quarry. Took 12 hours of crawling to reach the road – carried his equipment with him. Broke both legs. Shattered left knee and left elbow. Knee & elbow were compound fractures. Had to reattach muscles to knee & elbow. Leg had a vertical break through bone. Whatever it takes to live up to the collectors’ code to retrieve tools. 3 major surgeries in 4 days. He should’ve been dead.
He had been pushing on a crowbar when it slipped – he went forward & over & down.
This person committed numerous mistakes – they should have cost him his life.
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Working near moving equipment.
Host will inform about the presence (or not) of moving equipment while collecting.
Most of the time, heavy equipment will not be moving.
Power haulage accidents (big trucks & front-end loaders) are # 1 cause of miner deaths in the last 22 years.
Big haul trucks – views from the cab have enormous blind spots. Be respectful of the size of the equipment and the visual disadvantages the drivers have. Big haul trucks have blind spots: within 24 feet of tires, with 50 feet in front, 100 feet to the opposite side, and 100 to 150 feet behind.
Front-end loaders have less, but still substantial, blind spots, up to 29 feet.
When they come over the crest of a road, they have short sight distances. May not easily see you or your vehicle. They can’t stop on a dime.
Example fatal mine accident – a foreman’s truck got run over by an employee.
Example: a car got run over & caught on fire.
This is what happens when heavy meets light.
Don’t want to be around moving heavy equipment.
Example fatality: a truck was going up a 26% grade – driven by a new, inexperienced miner. The brakes and the back-up brake system were poorly maintained. Traveling up a steep ramp – nearly at the top. Truck stalled. Without brake system working & not aware of how to use back-up brakes, the truck free-wheeling down the ramp. Hit a berm – truck went over a highwall – killed him. Lesson – don’t follow a truck up a ramp.
Trucks stalling out are not uncommon, according to quarry foremen. Wait for truck to reach the top before you begin your trip out.
Moving equipment always have the right-of-way. Always face & acknowledge the driver. Maintain eye contact. Never park near or behind such vehicles.
Always ask where to park. And walk. And be. Never follow vehicles up a ramp.
Tool safety.
Not all tools are intended to be used with stone.
Don’t overstress tools. Use well-maintained tools.
Hammer & chisel – most common tools.
Flying metal chips may result from worn/mushroomed tools.
Beware flying rock pieces.
Watch smashed thumbs (chisel hand).
Watch detached hammer heads – they become airborne.
Glancing blows on chisel – it may fly away. This has been observed during collecting trips.
Chisels with hand guards are advised. They aren’t mandatory. Get them at Lowe’s.
Some chisels have wrenches or vice grips attached – can hold the chisel that way. Reducing risk of hitting your own hand.
Use chisels specifically for stone or masonry. Not for-metal or for-wood chisels.
Watch out for mushroomed chisel heads – get them ground/dressed. Otherwise will have flying metal bits.
A collector using a mushroomed chisel sent a piece of jagged metal flying and hit a nearby collector in the arm.
Hammer selection – mason’s hammer (chisel end, but not really – for soft materials), pick hammer (not designed for chiseling), drilling hammer (have broad faces – ideal for striking chisels). The former two aren’t good for striking a chisel head. Need a larger-faced hammer.
Longer-handled hammers saves wear & tear on your arm.
Estwing offers multiple-length hammers.
Some hammers have two-part construction. Heads are usually loose after one day of intense usage in a quarry, however. Go for single-piece constructed hammers (Estwing).
The width of the hammer’s striking face should be a least 3/8 inches wider than the width of the chisel head.
Keep one hand grasping the chisel at all times, even if you think the chisel is securely embedded in the matrix. Glancing blows do send chisels flying – this has been observed.
Ludlow Falls – has trilobites in dolomite. Collecting with a short-arm drilling hammer is tought. With a long-arm drilling hammer, collecting is so much easier.
Ludlow Falls is a non-stop hammering site.
One a hammer head begins to loosen – it’s a hazard.
Wooden-handle hammers don’t last one day at Ludlow Falls Quarry.
Always have eye protection.
Cutoff saws – not all places allow cutoff saws.
Watch burns from a hot manifold. Watch back strain, silica dust, flying debris, cutting disc explosion from excessive RPMs, kickback. Metal discs can disintegrate. Saws are noisy – do ear protection.
Lots of different types of blades. Segmented blades are effective for rough-cut work, for removing a delicate specimen with lots of matrix around it. Inspect cutting blades for cracks, warping, excessive wear. Never move guard. All have a trigger release mechanism – once your finger is off, it starts slowing down.
Blade RPM must be greater than the saw RPM. Keep dust filter cleaned.
Use gloves, dust masks, steel-toed boots, hardhat, eye protection, dust mask.
Need a respirator. Some rocks have low silica content, but no dust is free of hazard, in terms of silicosis. It’s a nasty disease. Don’t be cutting near other collectors, or only with their permission.
Fuel up saws when cold.
Support back by bracing elbow against knee while sawing.
Don’t forcefully push blade into rock. Pull blade back across the stone.
Never hand off a saw to someone else while blade is rotating.
Avoid touching the hot muffler.
Clean dust regularly.
Watch shifting winds from dusty saw use.
Rock drills. A popular tool. They create fewer vibrations – good for extracting delicate crystal vugs. Not much dust, compared with saws. Can chew up a lot of rock per unit time. Relatively dust-free. Wear a respirator anyway.
Hammering set pins. Can go flying with glancing blows from a sledge hammer.
Rock drilling is not a spectator sport. Give ‘em room. Always a risk of metal failure.
No such thing as an unbreakable hammer.
Stupid activity – striking a chisel on the cutting edge.
Stupid activity – a Ph.D. student was once allowed access to a quarry, and was discovered by foreman hanging from a rope along the highwall, sampling beds – the rope was tied to the vehicle’s bumper, while parked on a ramp. Lots of mistakes there.
Lifting safety.
Back pain risk factors – lifting heavy loads, . . .
Know personal limits. Wear a back brace. Bend at knees close to the load. Place hands on opposite corners of object – one hand pulls toward you & other lifts. Bring load close to body. Keep back vertical. Use legs to push yourself into a standing position. Change direction using feet – don’t twist your back.
Blasting. Quarry will inform you if this is planned.
Few have witnessed actual blasts. Flyrock can travel far. Can get miner deaths from that, including a miner a quarter-mile away.
Avoid intact, undetonated explosive charges. Report them to field trip leaders and foreman.
Know blasting schedules before entering. Clubs hardly ever do a field trip when blasting is occurring anyway.
Loud horns are sounded right before blasting – the horns are very distinct.
Water hazards – sumps and conveyance channels.
Most mines extend below the water table. They continually pump groundwater out.
Sumps are where all water collects at low areas. Water is cold, year-round. 55 degrees Fahrenheit temperature. We are never authorized to enter a lake, sump, or conveyance channel in a quarry. Abandoned mine drownings – Ohio leads the country in deaths from that (these deaths are not collectors, however).
Quarries that have been abandoned are generally not safe places to swim. Tell your kids.
Water is stratified – the cold water is below the warmer upper layer.
Weather conditions – heat can be troublesome.
Heat exhaustion can occur. Multiple symptoms. Risk factors – heat index, standing in full sunshine, lack of breeze, insulated clothing, physical exertion, being old, heat-reflecting surfaces, hat/helmet. Make provisions. Bring cooler with ice and towels. Be hydrated before & during visit.
A collector at an Aurora, North Carolina phosphate mine forgot to eat or drink, due to collecting enthusiasm. When it was time to haul fossils out, he took one step & froze up – body cramped up. Had to have others help him out & bring his stuff out.
First aid. Drink lots of fluid. Coffee doesn’t count. Remove unnecessary clothing. Iced towels. Fanning. Lie down with feet elevated, if dizzy. Turn on side, if nauseous.
Heat stroke requires immediate attention. Go to hospital. Are specific symptoms.
Lightning. While at Cardon, a collector on a blast pile had a storm move in. Moved off blast pile. Lightning started striking.
A strike can occur up to 15 miles away from a storm.
If you can hear it – it’s too close.
Direct strikes are not the most frequent cause of lightning deaths (only 3 to 4% of deaths are direct strikes). Most deaths are from ground current within 100 feet of a strike.
Can get horizontal arcing 60 feet away.
If trapped outside in a thunderstorm – don’t lie flat – it increases your chance of electrocution by ground current. Lightning gets conveyed through the metal of a car – that’s what protects you – not the rubber tires.
Don’t start collecting again until 30 minutes after the storm passes (after the last lightning/after the last thunder).
During storms, avoid open areas (floor or bench), avoid water (sumps), avoid metal objects, avoid crawling under big equipment. Crouch down against a rock with feet close together (not far apart), rather than lying down.
Most accidents occur when one is rushed or tired.
Realistically allocate time for trimming, carrying, packing, loading samples.
Don’t keep host waiting past the end time.
Collecting is a privilege. Behave in a way that earns the respect of your host, and an invitation to return.

Posted by James St. John on 2018-04-18 16:14:45

Tagged:

Stella Tedesco, da equipe do FILE, apresentando o Voto Popular

Stella Tedesco, da equipe do FILE, apresentando o Voto Popular

Stella Tedesco, da equipe do FILE, apresentando o Voto Popular

FILE PRIX LUX é um prêmio internacional que será concedido a profissionais na área das linguagens eletrônico-digitais. Trata-se de um prêmio para a arte do século XXI, uma iniciativa inédita na América Latina. A premiação ocorrerá em 26 de julho de 2010, no teatro do SESI – São Paulo, juntamente com a exposição do FILE 2010.
O FILE PRIX LUX concederá sete prêmios (primeiro lugar, segundo lugar e cinco menções honrosas) para cada uma das três categorias, oferecendo assim 21 prêmios em dinheiro no valor total de 285 mil reais. Além da seleção do júri, haverá votação popular que será feita através do site do FILE PRIX LUX. As categorias são: Arte Interativa, Linguagem Digital e Sonoridade Eletrônica.
Para saber mais sobre o FILE PRIX LUX acesse: www.fileprixlux.org

FILE PRIX LUX is an international prize that will be granted to professionals in the area of electronic-digital languages. It is an award for the art of the 21st century, an unprecedented initiative in Latin America. The award ceremony will happen on July 26, 2010, in the SESI – São Paulo theater, along with the FILE 2010 exhibition.
FILE PRIX LUX will grant seven prizes (first place, second place, and five honorable mentions) to each of three categories, thus offering 21 prizes in money, in the total amount of 285,000 reals. Besides the jury’s selection, there will be a popular vote through the FILE PRIX LUX website. The categories are: Interactive Art, Digital Language, and Electronic Sonority.
More information about FILE PRIX LUX can be found at: www.fileprixlux.org

FILE PRIX LUX is an international prize that will be granted to professionals in the area of electronic-digital languages. It is an award for the art of the 21st century, an unprecedented initiative in Latin America. The award ceremony will happen on July 26, 2010, in the SESI – São Paulo theater, along with the FILE 2010 exhibition.
FILE PRIX LUX will grant seven prizes (first place, second place, and five honorable mentions) to each of three categories, thus offering 21 prizes in money, in the total amount of 285,000 reals. Besides the jury’s selection, there will be a popular vote through the FILE PRIX LUX website. The categories are: Interactive Art, Digital Language, and Electronic Sonority.
More information about FILE PRIX LUX can be found at: www.fileprixlux.org

Indicados ao prêmio | Nominees

ARTE INTERATIVA | INTERACTIVE ART

As an artist, I need to rest – Sonia Cillari – Holanda | Netherlands

Building Music – Play the Magic: Julio Obelleiro, Alberto García, Jorge Cano & Pedro Enriquez – Estados Unidos | United States

Chorus – UVA: United Visual Artists – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

Compass Phone – Hayeon Yoo – Coréia do Sul | South Korea

CPU (Central Processing Unit) – 1n0ut: Robert Praxmarer & Reinhold Bidner – Áustria | Austria

CubeBrowser – Ludwig Zeller – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

CybeRITMO – Tuti Fornari – Brasil | Brazil

Digitie – Marianne Schmidt – Alemanha | Germany

Diorama Table – Keiko Takahashi & Shinji Sasada – Japão | Japan

Dune – Studio Roosegaarde: Daan Roosegaarde – Holanda | Netherlands

Ferrofluid Magnetoscope – Michael Flynn – Estados Unidos | United States

Flaneur Symphony – Keith Lam – China | China

Frame Seductions – Pierre Proske – França | France

Geogoo – Jodi: Joan Heemskerk & Dirk Paesmans – Holanda | Netherlands

Guten Touch – Multitouch Barcelona: Dani Armengol, Roger Pujol, Xavier Vilar & Pol Pla – Espanha | Spain

I wanted to see all of the news from today – Martin John Callanan – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

Light Calligraphy – Luo, He-Lin & Chen, I- Chun – Taiwan (R.O.C.) | Taiwan (R.O.C.)

Living Light – The Living: David Benjamin & Soo-in Yang – Estados Unidos | United States

Luzes relacionais (Relational Lights) – Ernesto Klar – Estados Unidos | United States
Mood Tail – Tseng,Wei-Chieh – Taiwan | Taiwan

Ocean of Light : Surface – Squidsoup: Anthony Rowe, Gareth Bushell, Christopher Bennewith, Liam Birtles & Ollie Bown – Nova Zelândia, Reino Unido e Austrália | New Zeland, United Kingdom and Australia

PISO – Rejane Cantoni & Leonardo – Brasil | Brazil

Public Epidemic Nº1 – Olle Cornéer & Martin Lübcke – Suécia | Sweden

Roy Block – Sebastian Schmieg – Alemanha | Germany

Salt Lake – Yacine Sebti & Tom Heene – Bélgica | Belgium

SARoskop – Martin Hesselmeier & Karin Lingnau – Alemanha – Germany
S-ICI/is it here? – Fred Périé – França | France

Sign after the X – David Clark, Marina Roy & Graham Meisner – Canadá | Canada

Slomo – Creative Advisor Group: John Paul Bichard & Magnus Jonsson – Suécia | Sweden

Sniff – Karolina Sobecka – Estados Unidos | United States

Space Invaders – Multitouch Barcelona: Dani Armengol, Roger Pujol, Xavier Vilar & Pol Pla – Espanha | Spain

Strings – Myrto Karanika & Jeremy Keenan – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

SuperFluidity – Electronic Shadow: Naziha Mestaoui & Yacine Aït Kaci – França | France

The Travels of Mariko Horo – Tamiko Thiel – Alemanha | Germany

The Trend Is Your Friend – Sylvia Eckermann and Gerald Nestler. Sound by Peter Szely – Áustria | Austria

V+ – Jonas Bohatsch – Áustria | Austria

Virtual Ground – Andrew Hieronymi – Estados Unidos | United States

Vitalino – Jarbas Jácome – Brasil | Brazil

SMSlingshot – VR/Urban: Patrick Tobias Fischer, Christian Zöllner, Thilo Hoffmann & Sebastian Piatza – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

Waves – Daan Brinkmann & Hugues Bruyère – Holanda | Netherlands

WAVO – Kazushi Mukaiyama & Masaki Maeda – Kazushi Mukaiyama & Masaki Maeda

SONORIDADE ELETRÔNICA | ELECTRONIC SONORITY

2x (Power of two) – Jorge Luis Crowe – Argentina | Argentina

Archetypal Sound Installation (ASI) – Sung, Heng – Taiwan | Taiwan

Camera Lucida: Sonochemical Observatory – Evelina Domnitch & Dmitry Gelfand – Holanda | Netherlands

Disc. – Muk – Áustria | Austria

Experimental Music-Instruments – Yoshi Akai – Japão | Japan

From Dust Till Dawn – Markus Decker, Dietmar Offenhuber & Ushi Reiter – Áustria | Austria

HEARTCHAMBERORCHESTRA – TERMINALBEACH: Erich Berger & Peter Votava – Finlândia | Finland

ITINERÁRIO DO SAL – MISO ENSEMBLE: Miguel Azguime, Paula Azguime, André Bartetzki & Perseu Mandillo – Portugal | Portugal

Laptork – Laptork: Esteban Insinger & Fabian Kesler –Argentina | Argentina

LEMURtron – LEMUR: League of Electronic Musical Urban Robots & Eric Singer – Estados Unidos | United States

Light Frequency Fingertips – Robert Mathy – Áustria | Austria

METROBANG – Vinil Bass Sequencer – Ricardo Brazileiro – Brasil | Brazil

netBody:“Augmented Body and Virtual Body II” – Suguru Goto – França | France

Omnibusonia Paulista – Vanderlei Lucentini – Brasil | Brazil

POWEr – Artificiel: Alexandre Burton & Julien Roy – França | France

Reflection Eternal – Matthias Kassmannhuber – Áustria | Austria

Reler – Raquel Kogan – Brasil | Brazil

RGB Music RENGA: 999 Views of Skyscrapers from Great Lawn in Central Park, New York City – Kenji Kojima – Estados Unidos | United States

Silent Percussion Project – Jaime E Oliver LR – Peru | Peru

Soundcities – stanza – United Kingdom

The Baghdad Monologue – Alejandro Viñao – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

Tongue Music: The Sound of a Kiss – Hye Yeon Nam – Estados Unidos | United States

Truce: Strategies for Post-Apocalyptic Computation – Robin Meier & Ali Momeni – França | France

Wet Sounds – Spax – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

LINGUAGEM DIGITAL | DIGITAL LANGUAGE

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz for iPhone – Joerg Piringer – Áustria | Austria

ArtFem.TV – Evelin Stermitz – Áustria | Austria

Binary Glove – Pete Hawkes – Estados Unidos | United States

BioBodyGame – Rachel Zuanon & Geraldo Lima – Brasil | Brazil

Breathing – Guto Nóbrega – Brasil | Brazil

CONNECT – Andreas Muxel – Alemanha | Germany

Death Death Death – Death Death Death – Estados Unidos | United States

Dreams in High Fidelity II – Spot – Estados Unidos | United States

GenePool – Eric Parren – Holanda | Netherlands

Hakodate Luminart – Hakodate Luminart Project – Japão | Japan

Hi! A real human interface – Multitouch Barcelona: Dani Armengol, Roger Pujol, Xavier Vilar & Pol Pla – Espanha | Spain

Marvim Gainsbug – Jeraman & Filipe Calegario – Brasil | Brazil

Mediaflow – MARS: Media Arts Research Studies: Monika Fleischmann & Wolfgang Strauss – Alemanha | Germany

Of How We Have To Leave Doubts Expectations And The Unachieved – André Gonçalves – Portugal | Portugal

RESCATE – Gabriela Golder – Argentina | Argentina

RYO 5000 – YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES: Young-hae Chang & Marc Voge – Coréia do Sul | South Korea

SOLAR – Rejane Cantoni & Leonardo Crescenti – Brasil | Brazil

Southern Ocean Study # 1.0 – Corby & Baily, Jonathan Mackenzie – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

Tardigotchi – SWAMP – Douglas Easterly, Matt Kenyon & Tiago Rorke – Nova Zelândia | New Zealand

The First Poetry Space Shuttle Landing on Second Life – Caterina Davinio, Mirko Lalit Egger & Riccardo Preziosi – Reino Unido | United Kingdom

Tuvalu Visualization Project – Hidenori Watanave Laboratory, Tokyo Metropolitan University & NPO Tuvalu Overview – Japão | Japan

War of Internet Addiction – Corndog & Oil Tiger Machinima Team – China | China

Wizard of OS: The Fish Incident – Tom Jantol – Croácia | Croatia

Posted by FILE PRIX LUX on 2010-05-28 18:17:15

Tagged: , FILE , Festival Internacional de Linguagem Eletrônica , Electronic Language International Festival , São Paulo , Rio de Janeiro , Recife , Porto Alegre , prêmio , FILE PRIX LUX , arte e tecnologia , art and technology , prêmio de arte e tecnologia , art and technology prize , prize , opening cocktail , coquetel de abertura , file festival , Paula Perissinotto , Ricardo Barreto

. technics

. technics

Posted by Ruinenstaat on 2018-04-16 06:12:13

Tagged: , Tumra Needi , Ruinenstaat , In Ruins , Platz der alten Steine , Lost , Lost Place , Leerstand , Oblivion , Old , Alt , Abandoned , Derelict , Decay , Dust , Staub , Forgotten , Forlaten , Verlassen , Verfallen , Verfall , vergessen , verlaten , PC , Personal Computer , Neglected , Nikon D750 , Urbex , Urban Exploring , Urban Exploration , Usine , Fabrik , Factory

CO2 and dust sensor dashboard on Raspberry pi

CO2 and dust sensor dashboard on Raspberry pi

ThingsBoard is a great open source program to visualize sensor data without programming.
thingsboard.io/
I have downloaded it into Raspberry pi and running as a MQTT server. then sensors attached to ESP32 CPU can send the data a, visualize like this.

Posted by coniferconifer on 2018-04-14 13:52:34

Tagged: , CO2 , dust , thingsboard , ESP32

[PC] CSGO v1.36.3.0 [Action/ISO/2018]

[PC] CSGO v1.36.3.0 [Action/ISO/2018]

CSGO v1.36.3.0

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Year: 2018 Genre: Action Developer: Valve Corporation and Hidden Path Entertainment Publisher : Valve

System requirements: Operating system: Windows XP SP3 / Vista / 7 SP1 / 8.1 / 10 Processor: Pentium 4 3 GHz or dual core from Intel 2 GHz / AMD64X2 Memory: 1 GB (XP) / 2 GB (Vista / 7 / 8.1 / 10) Video Card: 128 MB VRAM compatible with DirectX 9.0 and the technology to support Pixel Shader 2.0b Sound card: compatible with DirectX 9.0c Free space on hard drive: 15 GB

Publication Type: Informal Language: Multilingual Sound language: English

Description: Counter-Strike: Global Offensive – the new multiplayer first-person shooter, designed to deepen and refine the very command game mechanics "five by five," for which all come to love and Counter-Strike.

The program includes entertainment Global Offensive as all-new maps, characters and weapons, and the mountain of "classic" things like de_dust and other religious levels, a small post-restructuring. A pile of original game modes, board leaders and indispensable lobby for the soldiers – all of this is also included.

Features of distribution: – Based on license; – Game Version: 1.36.3.0 – Installation time: 12 minutes.

Installation: 1. Run setup.exe 2. Install the game in any convenient place

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System requirements

MINIMUM:CPU: Intel Core 2 Duo E6600 or AMD Phenom X3 8750 processor or betterCPU SPEED: InfoRAM: 2 GBOS: Windows 7/Vista/XPVIDEO CARD: Video card must be 256 MB or more and should be a DirectX 9-compatible with support for Pixel Shader 3.0SOUND CARD: YesFREE DISK SPACE: 8 GB

Click to expand…

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Nguồn: ift.tt/2JywgGt

Posted by CongTruongIT.Com on 2018-04-10 14:02:35

Tagged: , [PC] , CSGO , v1.36.3.0 , [Action/ISO/2018]